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March 25, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PRESENTS
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
REPRISE RECORDING ARTISTS
come and hear swinehorns blow
again!-or maybe a clavinette
THE MUSIC OF ROCKET MEN AND SATYRS
MARCH 26-29 330 MAYNARD ST.
FRI.-MON. 2-0 8 P.M.-Doors Open

p.age three

SI P

Sf11 rign

Baitt

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, March 25, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

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tn e wsbrie fs
By The Associated Press
ISRAELI TROOPS killed four Arab guerrillas and captured four
more in a fight on the occupied Golan Heights of Syria, the military
announced yesterday.
It was the largest guerrilla infiltration from Syria in several
months. The incident occurred near Guneitra on Monday, a spokesman
said.
ARGENTINA'S MILITARY JUNTA yesterday bid for labor
support by taking the lid off current nation-wide wage talks.
The government of President Roberto Levingston, ousted Monday,
had set a 19 per cent ceiling on wage increases for the nation's 9 mil-
lion workers, but the junta removed the limit and withdrew from the
wage talks altogether.j
Still problematic, however, was the cattlemen's boycott, now in its
ninth day. The boycott may necessitate a ban on local beef sale and
alienate Argentina's powerful cattle ranchers.

Panther rnd iets
nat'l leadership
NEW HAVEN, Conn. G4 - A Black Panther official ar-
rived in New Haven with a pistol several days before the death
of Alex Rackley "to help straighten things out," a key pros-
ecution witness at the trial of Bobby Seale and Ericka Hug-
gins testified yesterday.
Warren Kimbro, a Black Panther who has pleaded guilty
to second degree murder in the slaying of Rackley, said a
party officer told him that Rory Hithe "had come down from
national to straighten out the East Coast."
The party's National headquarters is in Oaklnd, Calif.
Kimbro, a gaunt, former anti-
poverty worker who testified at
an earlier trialthat he shot Rack-
ley in the head on May 21, 1969,
in a swampy riverbed 20 miles
north of here, said he and Mrs.
Huggins drove to New York six
days before Rackley's death to
pik up Hithe.

*

" HIGHEST"$
DOORS OPEN 12:45RATING
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7,:45P.M. "Wanda Hae. New YorkDayNs M
NEXT: "GOING DOWN THE ROAD"
University of Michigan Film Society (ARM)
presents
Marcel Carne's
Les enfanis duparadis
(Children of Paradise)
written by JACQUES PREVERT

PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday sent to Congress his plans for
* the Action Corps, a new federal agency combining most of the gov-
ernment's volunteer service programs.
The combination would involve seven programs, including VISTA,
the Teachei;'s Corps and the Peace Corps and require a budget of over
$176 million.
Joseph Blatchford, the Peace Corps Director whom Nixon named
to head Action Corps, said Americans would now have a central agency
to apply to for volunteer work, instead of having to "chase all over
Washington."

* 4 *
MEYER LANSKY, reputed financial wizard of the underworld,
was indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury on a charge of con-
tempt.
Lansky had refused to testify about the operations of a Las Vegas
casino at a hearing in Miami Beach. He is presently living with his wife
in Tel Aviv, Israel.
E. David Rosen, Lansky's attorney,, said in Miami the subpoena
should be quashed because Lansky suffers from ulcers and a bad heart'
and cannot travel.
* * *
ECOLOGIST BARRY COMMONER said yesterday the nation'sj
environmental crisis is the result of faulty technologies used to re-
build industrial and agricultural production since World War II.
He said the introduction of most technological advances, such as
the synthetic chemicals or nuclear power took into account "the laws
of physics and chemistry without taking into account the laws of
ecology."
Commoner said that many of the new products of technology were
more damaging to the environment than the things that they replaced,
such as synthetic fibers for wool and cotton and detergents for soaps.

with Arletty, Jean-Louis Barrault,
Pierre Brasseur, Pierre Renoir
FRI DAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY
March 26, 27, 28
Natural Science Auditorium
ON THE DIAG
7:00 and 10:15 p.m.
contribution $1.00
761-9751

1
E
i
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I

~]!I4rm

603 E. Liberty
DIAL Shows at
5-6290 7 and
9 P.M.
Ali Maclraw -Ryan' ONeal
#1

DOORS
OPEN
6:45

A

I

TOMOR ROW NIG HT
ONCE ONLY AT 9:05 P.M.
A
VERY
ESPECIAL
PREVIEW
OF A VERY
,SPECIAL
FEATURE
IN COLOR
PLUS OUR
REGULAR
FEATURE
LATE!
AT THE
DON'T MISS IT!! !
* Eimmaummmmmma

FREE LIST Beselif
SUSPENDED
Nominated for
7 Academy n MalRa MinE
Awards Jh aly a iln
GP &Vc~ IN COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

-Associated Press
Looting in Opa Locka
Flames and smoke billow from a bar and restaurant in suburban
Opa Locka, Fla. yesterday where roving bands of young blacks
have been looting and burning small businesses. It is the second day
of violence in the predominately black area.
UNILATERAL GESTURE':
Borman asks U.S. to
releas 1,600 POW's
WASHINGTON () - Former as- Paul Findleyn (R-Ill) a member of
tronaut Frank Borman recom- the subcommittee.
mended yesterday that the United A unilateral prisoner release
States and South Vietnam release would involve some risKs with no
hundreds of prisoners of war in an guarantee of returns, Bormian said,
effort to prod Hanoi into freeing or "but I do thing it is an acceptable
easingrthe lot of American POW'sIrisk at any rate. It would empha-
in North Vietnam. size this country's concern and
Borman, testifying before a willingness to approach this issue."
House Foreign Affairs subcommit- Borman said the communists
tee, suggested also that if negotia- consider the prisoners as hostages
tions in Paris remain deadlocked, and "trump cards" and that the
contacts elsewhere be pursued. United States should not yield to
A number of North Vietnamese demands made by North Vietnam
captured in the South equal to the on this basis.
number of Americans missing or "We cannot modify our foreign
captured in the North, about 1,600, policy with a gun at our head, so
should be released with "no strings to speak," he said.
attached," Borman said. Borman also said visits abroad
The retired Air Force colonel, by American officials and private
who traveled around the world as citizens on the prisoner issue
President Nixon's emissary on should be pursued, observing that
POW matters last fall, urged quick they have had some impact on the
action on such a release proposal treatment of POWs in North Viet-
introduced in Congress by Rep.' nam.
U of M Romance Languages Dept.
presents
:w"La Celestina"
by Fernando de Rojas
Trueblood Auditorium-Frieze Building
March 25
2:30 p.mn.-$l.5O $1.00<.r
8:30 p.m.-$2.00 $1.50
BOX OFFICE OPEN FROM 1 P.M.-8:30 P.M.
\ .
CINEMA II
"La Grande Illusion"
FRENCH, 1937
with ERIC VON STROHEIM
directed by JEAN RENOIR
"I made 'La Grande Illusion' because I am a pacifist."
-Renoir, 1938
Friday and Saturday 7:00, 9:00 p.m
-PLUS-
"A View From the Bridge"
with Carol Lawrence, Raf Vallone, Maureen Stapleton
screenplay by ARTHUR MILLER
directed by SIDNEY LUMET
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 11:00 p.m.
SUNDAY 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
MARCH 26, 27, 28 AUD. A., ANGELL HALL
75c (separate admission for ea'ch show)
NEXT WEEK
MARLON BRANDO'S
"ONE-EYED JACKS"

Desadopt peace plank

"Rory had just come in from
the Coast and he had brought his
piece with him," the witness said.
He added that the "'piece"~ was "a
.45." Hithe, who also is charged
in the Rackley slaying, is fighting
extradition in Colorado.
Seale, 34 - year - old national
chairman of the Black Panthers,
and Mrs. Huggins, 23-year-o 1 d
former official of the party's lo-
cal chapter, face capital charges
of kidnaping resulting in death
and aiding and abetting murder in
Rackley's slaying.
They are also accused of con-
spiring to murder and kidnap the
victim.
Kimbro's testimony was inter-
rupted by frequent defense ob-
jections that incidents and con-
versations he was describing did
not pertain to either Seale or Mrs.
Huggins. Judge Harold M. Mul-
vey of Superior Court admitted
most of the testimony subject to a
showing that it supported t h e
conspiracy charges.
Late in the morning, the jury
was dismissed until Tuesday to al-
low the defense to argue against
admission of evidence seized at an
apartment serving as t h e local
party headquarters.

WASHINGTON (iP) - T he
Democratic party's top policy-
making group .yesterday voted
unanimously to call' for total U.S.-
withdrawal from Indochina by the
end of 1971.
The Democratic Policy Council's
action goes beyond that taken by
Senate Democrats recently in call-
ing for total withdrawal by a fix-
ed date before the current Con-
gress ends in January 1973. In
addition, it sharpens political lines
b dI

between Democrats and the Nixon
administration.
The resolution calls on the ad-
ministration to announce that all
American forces will be withdrawn
by the end of 1971 and urges Con-
gress to enact legislation barring
U.S. funds for the war after Dec.
31.
It thus puts the council on re-
cord in favor of the proposal re-
jected 55 to 39 by the Senate last
August, whose chief sponsors are
Sens. Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.)
and Georg e S. McGovern (D-
S.D.).
McGovern, a council member, is
the only announced candidate so
far for the 1972 Democratic Pres-
idential nomination.
Some 68 of t h e 100 Council
members attended the all d ay'
meeting. They adopted a women's
rights amendment introduced by
author Gloria Steinem but defer-
red action on the economy and
other issues.

program
WASHINGTON (P) - Fr ank
Carlucci, the new director of the
Office of Economic Opportunity
(OEO) said yesterday he person-
ally favors giving poverty lawyers
unlimited freedom in defending
clients, even if they bring class
action suits.
Carlucci, whose nomination to
the OEO post was approved by the
Senate yesterday, defended the
frequently criticized Legal Services
program as "one of OEO's bright-
est achievements," before a Sen-
ate subcommittee.
"There are certain limits in the
statute such as not taking any
criminal cases and staying with-
in certain income guidelines," Car-
lucci said, testifying at a Senate
subcommittee hearing.
Beyond that, he said, he be-
lieves Legal Service attorneys
should be as free to help their
clients as any other lawyer might
be.
Carlucci said he endorsed class
action cases, referring to suits
brought by one person on behalf
of many others who feel they may
have been similarly wronged.

WELCOME TO U-M
BARBERS
next to South U. Dank
MEET STYLISTS:
BOB DASCOLA
JERRY ERICKSON
(formerly of Maple
Village-Arborland)
Open Mon.-Sat.

BACH CLUB
CONTEMPORARY REACTIONS CONCERT
A 1-hour program of works by Bach Club
composers writing in the styles of Bach, Mo-
zart, and Brahms
-featuring-
Concert Overture .........Joseph Marcus
for piano, 4 hands
Concert Movement .......Randolph Smith

I

F

for piano and string orchestra
Variations and Fugue on
"Jingle Bells" ....... .
for string quartet

AAFC Presents 75c
-TONIGHT-U
BOGART and HEPBURN

=r:;:;::;s.
", " ',
: '
fit " }::
1 . t.

Michael Pilojian

I I

aind1 more!

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