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March 24, 1971 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-24

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 24, 197 1

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 24, 1971

State

Democrats

ask

earlier income

ax hike
LANSING (M - Michigan
Democratic leadership yester-
day recommended that the
state income tax be increased
Oct. 1, rather than Jan. 1 as
suggested by Gov. William
Milliken.
In addition to this recommenda-
tion, the Michigan Democrats
charged that Gov. William Milli-
ken used "arithmetic misleadingI
in the extreme" and "gross ex-
aggeration" of the .General Mo-
tors strike in writing a $1.97 bil-
lion budget proposal for next year.
In a report prepared by Univer-
sity economics Prof. Harvey Braz-
er for the Democratic State Cen-
tral Committee, the Democrats
said the state might realize $85
million by advancing the tax boost
to this fall. Brazer frequently an-
analyzes fiscal affairs for the state
party.
Milliken has called for hikingj
the personal income tax rate from
2.6 per cent to 3.6 per cent next
year.
An earlier increase, the report
said, "would permit the accumula-
tion of a surplus that would, at
least for the immediate future,
help avoid the necessity of the
painful and disruptive mid-year
budgetary shenanigans required
as a consequence of Gov. Milli-
ken's fiscal misadventures this
year."
The 4,000-word study, in charg-
ing Milliken with "gross exagger-
ation" by blaming the 69-day
UAW strike against GM for the
state's estimated deficit, said:.
"At least two thirds ofsthe$158
million anticipated deficit in the
general fund budget is attribut-
able not to the GM strike but to
miscalculations, myopia and the
unanticipated depth and duration
of the recent economic recession."
"Despite the sharp drop in pro-
fits experienced by the auto in-
dustry, we find it impossible to
justify a figure as low as $151
million" for estimated corporate
income returns in fiscal year
1970-71, the report continued.
"Our estimate, which we believe
to be conservative, is $171 million
for the corporate income tax."
But while branding Milliken
"excessivelyepessimistic" in plan-
ning revenue collections, the re-
port accused him of planning
harshly "unrealistic" restraints on
essential services.
"The governor's attitude seems
to be one that might be appro-
priate to an automobile factory,
but it simply cannot be made to
work in state and local govern-
ment."

Hunter files
suit for job
} (Continued rrom Page 1)
the month of January. It c it e d
several days when Hunter had
called in sick and had also alleg-
edly been seen eating lunch at a
local restaurant, driving his car,
and attending a school board
meeting.
In testimony, however, Hunter
said that during January an ulcer
had been bothering him, and his
doctor had suggested that he take
time off.
"Slaughter told me that if I was
not telling the truth that he would
demand my resignation," Hunter
said. "I said he had no reason not
to believe that I wasn't telling the
truth about my illness and my en-
rollment in the University."
Hunter later told of a confronta-
tion he had had with Donald
Borut, assistant city administra-
tor. Hunter claimed their discus-
sion terminated with Borut say-
ing "boy, get out of this office."
"I told him no white man can
call me a boy," Hunter continued
in testimony.
The city, however, in concluding
their case, denied Hunter's con-
tantions that racial incidents had
occurred and had led to Hunter's
firing, reasserting their position
that Hunter's "inconsistencies"
forced the city to dismiss him.
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 7)
Tickets: Maximum of four to each
prospective graduate, to be distributed
from Mon., Apri1 12, to 5 p.m., April
30, at Diploma Office, 1518 LSA.
Academic Costume: May be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. University Ave.
Orders must be placed between March
I15 and April 15.
Assembly for Graduates: At 9:30 a.m.
in area east of Stadium. Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations. In
case of inclement weather, graduates
will go directly to the building where
they will be seated by marshals.
Spectators: All spectators should be
seated in the building by 10:30 a.m.
when procession is concluded.
Graduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, etc.: Inquire at desk in first
floor lobby of LSA Building.
Commencement Programs: Will be
distributed at exercises.
Distribution of Diplomas: Diplomas
conferred as of May 1, 1971, may be
called for at 514 LSA Bldg., June 1
through June 7. Medical School diplo-
mas will be distributed at Senior Class
Night exercises June 4.
Doctoral degree candidates who qual-
ify for the Ph.D., A.Mus.D., or Ed.D.
degree and who attend the commence-
ment exercises will be given a hood by
the University as part of the ceremony.
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B.
Thursday, March 25:
Classic Crafts,Berrien Springs, Mi.
10-5. Appis. being accepted for summer
college prog. Positions avail, as com-
pany rep. Challenging opportunity for
ambitious indiv. who enjoys travel.
Must have car.
Camp Ma-Hi-Ya, Toledo Jewish
Comm. Camp in Mich., 10-3 openings.
for waterfront dir., cooks and senior
couns. 18 or over.

PANTHER TRIAL:
Judge denies motion
in New Haven case

FOLLET T'
MICHIGAN :iOOK -TR
WILL BE CLOSED FOR INVENTORY
Thursday, March 25
through Saturday, March 27

4i

I _,_________________

-Daily-Jim Judkis
MAYORAL CANDIDATES debate problems of Ann Arbor's en-
vironment yesterday under the sponsorship of Environmental
Action for Survival. From left to right are Jack Garris, Re-
publican, Doug Cornell, Radical Independent Party, and incum-
bent Mayor Robert Harris, Democrat.
Dems, GOP, RIP
clash in ENACT talk

(Continued from Page 1)
Concluding her testimony yes-
terday, Hudgins described seeing
Sams beat Panther Lonnie McLuc-
as' wife Loretta.
"He told her to play some re-
cords, then he slapped her if she
played a record he didn't like ...
Then he asked her to recite the
(Black Panther Party) ten-point
program, but she didn't know it
too good - so he made her do
sit-ups for a real long time."
Hudgins explained that Mc-
Lucas pleaded with Sams to let
her go, telling him that she once
had polio and her legs could
not withstand the abuse. Sams
forced her to continue, however.
Under cross-examination by the
defense, Hudgins said she never
saw Seale at the New Haven Pan-
ther headquarters, nor had she
ever seen Seale and Sams to-
gether.
This was directed toward the
state's allegation that Seale h a d
given Sams orders to kill Rack-
ley.
Under questioning by Garry,
Hudgins told of a Black Panther
meeting several days prior to the
Hamburg Recreation League, Ham-
burg, Mi., opening for Prog. supr. De-
tails at SPS.
RCA Corp., N.J. SummerIntern posi-
tions avail. In Camden, Hightstown,
and Burlington.
Equitable Life Assurance Co., N.Y.
announces summer Actuarial Training
Program for undergrads having com-
pleted at least two years in math, or
econ. or stat.
Penn. Dept. of Trans., Harrisburg,
Pa., civil engr. trainee prog. open. to
students who have completed their
soph. year.
Ram Island Yacht Club, Conn. Open-
ings for steward and sailing instructor.
Must be 21.
Tennessee Valley Auth., Knoxville.
Opening for biol. aide - must have
knowledge of forest bot. and freshwater
aquatic biol.
Community Psych. Clinic, Bethesda,
Md., Day camp for emotionally dist.
kids. Details at SPS.
_ --CLIP AND SAVE....
LOW COST, SAFE, LEGAL
SABORTION',
IN NEW YORK
SCHEDULED IMMEDIATELY
t (212) 490.3600
1 PROFESSIONAL SCHEDULING SERVICE, Inc.I
545 Fifth Ave., New York City 10017
There is a fee for our service.
Summer Employment
Classic Crafts Corporation
is presently interviewing for
summer program
MUST BE ABLE TO TRAVEL
AND WORK 13 WEEKS
Starting April 30 thr.u July 31
Guaranteed Salary $2,000
Interviews
March 25, March 31, April 8
Phone 764-7460-Summer
Placement Office-212 SAB

alleged murder at which the Par-
ty's 10-point platform and the
code of conduct for members were
discussed. Garry then directed
Hudgins to read both documents
to the court.
Upon re-direct examination of
the witness, state attorney Arn-
old Markle mentioned a provision
in the Panther rules which says
"No party member will commit
any crime against other p a r t y
members or black people at all."
He asked Hudgins whether she
had reported Sams' misconduct in
daily reports she wrote concern-
ing Panther activities.
"No" came the muffled response
from the witness.
*"" CLIP AND SAVE ..."""".
!YOUR ABORTION!
" *s
:IS NO LOTTERYII
* Cal the people who'vetaken the chance:
" ~out of abortion.s
:C212)490-3600:
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0 e There is a fee for our service00sI

At

(Continued from Page 1)
vironment could be taken under
the present system dominated the
debate.
Cornell said Mayor.Harris willI
do "everything against pollution
short of challenging the system
which caused it", and said t h e
Democrats are only using "stop-
gap" measures against pollution.
Cornell called free enterprise the
freedom "to do anything to the
ecology in order to forward your
enterprise."
He accused the Democrats of
protecting the interests of the
Spurr post to,
stay empty
(Continued from Page 1)
cellors-"Things fortunately just
happened to coincide," he said.
Smith said Monday that Hays'
duties "will be at least in part con-
cerning academic development.
Whether he will be a part of the
reorganization of academic serv-
ices, I don't know yet."
"But," Smith added, "My guess
is he will, because to the extent that
some of Spurr's duties are reas-
signed back to academic affairs
where they came from, I will give
some of them to Hays."
Although Smith did not stipulate
exactly what would come under his
office due to Spurr's departure, one'
source has indicated Hays will take
over such areas as admissions, fi-
nancial aids and orientation.
Vice President for Student Serv-
ices Robert Knauss said last night
it would also be feasible to move
counseling serviceseandorientation
under the auspices of his office
"because there is a strong relation-
ship there in respect to what we
are already doing in this office."
Meanwhile, a search committee
is being organized within the grad-
uate school to find a new dean.
Spurr was out of town last night!
and could not be reached fbr com-
ment.
ABORTIONS
Arrangements are made within
24 hrs. with board certified
gynecologists in accredited New
York hospitals near airport.
Low cost-Strictly confidential
-Special consideration for stu-

business community and said
"only when control of industry is
in the hands of the people can
environmental problems be solv-I
Faber countered by saying "Ann
Arbor is not an abstraction" and
the environmental problem in the
city is not a matter of ideals or
problems of two-party politics but
a matter of practical day to dayI
decisions.
Although the attacks of the RIP
candidates were aimed at the
traditional practices of both the
Republicans and the Democrats,
Garris refrained , from debating
with the Radicals over ideological
questions and concentrated rather
on attacking Mayor Harris' polic-
ies.
On the matter of the proposed
Briarwoodmshopping center Garris
said the most important consid-
erations were "the impact on the
central business district and on
the environment."
He charged the Democrats with
suppressing information on the
matter and said they had decided
in closed caucus to "kill" the pro-
posal.
Harris said he felt certain there
would be such a center in Washte-
new county whether or not it was
built in Ann Arbor. He said the
question therefore was to what ex-
tent the city could deal with the
development which would mini-
mize environmental damage. f
Challenging both the Republican
and Democratic positions, Cornell
announced the "100per cent" op-
position of RIP to the building of
Briarwood in Ann Arbor, citing the
report of the ecology center which
is critical of the development.
For the student body:
FLARES

TWO THINGS ARE BETTER ON A WATER BED
ONE OF THEM IS SLEEPING
HARVEY'S WATER BEDS
For apartment, home, or pool
Water Beds, standard bed sizes
King Size.................................$44.95
Queen Size ...................39.95
Double or Twin ............................. . 34.95
Safety Liners, all sizes ........................... 1 0.95
Water Couch 38"x75" ................39.95
Water Pillows,3for bath or bed.6.50
10 Year Guarantee-Free step by step instructions for building
your own frame, We pay shipping-Easy filling directions included
-Send checks payable to: HARVEY'S WATER BEDS, Dept. 14,
1219 7th Ave., San Francisco, California 94122.
Interested in selling water beds? Write to us for further infor-
motion.
How Good Can
A Compromise Get?
The BOSE people believe as good as it takes to satisfy all true
stereo speaker fans. So here's the Bose 501, a direct/reflecting
speaker system with the best of both worlds-the innovative
design of the Bose 901 PLUS a price tag for the budget mind-
ed. The major compromise in design was the use of a woofer
in the 501 instead of nine drivers as in the 901. But still the
clarity and realism of the 501, though exceeded by the 901,
should be superior to that of all speakers costing less than the
901. Using the wall of your home to reflect sound the 501
eliminates the undesirable point source effect of conventional
speakers. "Alive" Stereo can be enjoyed from almost any posi-
tion in your home. So how good can a compromise get?-As
good as the Bose 501 sounds, an ultramodern looking speakerr
system for less than $250. So Step Inside HI-FI BUYS and
sound test them yourself.

University Activities Center
presents
Creative Arts Festival 1971
VIETNAM PHOTO DISPLAY
Ugh
Mar. 15-Mar. 31-UNDERGRADUATE ART SHOW
Rackham Gallery, 3rd floor
Mar. 22-Mar. 24- SILKSCREENING in the Fishbowl
Mar.25-=Entirely student-produced musical
"SID SHRYCOCK GOES TO AFRICA"
East Quad Auditorium, 8:00
tickets at the door
STUDENT PLAY
27:00and 10:00
tickets at the door
STUDENT CRAFTS FAIR
Union Ballroom 10:00-10:00
"TO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK'
Mar. 28- Hill Auditorium, 3:00
Tickets at PTP Box Office
co-sponsored with PTP
Apr. 2-Apr. 3 GENESIS III FILM FESTIVAL
Natural Science Auditorium
7:00 and 9:30
$1.50 at door

I

I

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits.....$6.98
(All Colors)
Bells ......... $8.50
DENIM

Bush Jeans
Bells ......
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims.

..$10.00
... $8.00
... $7.50
... $7.00

by
*'Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
Sebring

HEK MATE
Stte Street atLity

I

r---

i

!1rW -

dents.

516 62-8000
Open 24 hrs. 7 days
Medical Referral Service
142 Mineola Ave.
Roslyn Hts., N. Y. 11 577

II!

CHECKMATE

State Street at Liberty

Tomorrow at 4:00 p.m.
A lecture on
"A Sociological Look at the Future of Religion"
Professor Anton C. Zijderveld
-author of The Abstract Society: a cultural analysis of our times
"Pluralistic Society is an abstract society with an atrophied experience of mean-
ing and reality. Such a society might, admittedly, leave much room for individual
choices, but it is questionable if such liberty constitutes human freedom."

The r
ear Russian In Il-B
The Department of Slavic Languages may offer

$124.80

You ea #r t. f r nc* new

II I

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