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March 24, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tues., Wed.-Mar. 23, 24
AMERICAN FILM STUDIES PROGRAM
FANTASTIC VOYAGE
A skin flick from the inside starring RAQUEL
WELCH as a brainy laser-beam technician.
Watch Raquel attacked by a mob of corpulent white
blood cells.
"A REAL BODY TRI P"

1

ayethree
Wed nesday, March 24, 1971

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lfixli an

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NEW S PHONE: 764-0554
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

nye TwhsAbriefs
By The Associated Press

N. Ireland p
Faulkner as

parliament elects

prime

7 & 9:05
662-8871

75c

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

Thurs., Mar. 25-"Brewster's Millions"
Fri., Mar. 26-"Hail the Conquering Hero"

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE Alan A. Lindsay of Oakland
was named yesterday to hear the Angela Davis case.
Lindsay replaces retired Superior Court Judge John H. Mc.-
Murray of Inyo County, who disqualified himself last Wednesday
on a motion of prejudice by the black militant's co-defendant.
Lindsay, 54, will preside at San Rafael, where Miss Davis
- andRuchell Magee are charged with murder, kidnap and con-
I spiracy in a shootout last Aug. 7 that killed four persons at the
Marin County Civic Center.

I

* * *
SIERRA LEONE'S army commander, Brig. John Bangurah,
was arrested last night by his own senior officers only hours af-I
ter he announced he had taken over the government from Prime
Minister Siaka P. Stevens.
The takeover was led by Lt. Col. Sam King, who announced that'
Stevens would be restored to office. Stevens was ousted after a dawn
gun-battle in front of his home which brought about the West-Afri-
can country's second coup in four years.
The coup followed several months of simmering political unrest
after Stevens imposed a strict state of emergency last Sept. 1, giving
his regime wide powers.
Steven's whereabouts were not known for certain, but reliable
army sources reported he was being held in protective custody.I
* * *
FOUR SENATORS joined yesterday in describing Secretary
of State William P. Roger's Middle East settlement suggestions
as "dangerous, befuddled, unfair and folly."
Sen. Javits (R-N.Y.) and Sen. Jackson (D-Wash.) assailed the
suggestion that Israel agree in principle to withdraw from occupied
Arab territory, claiming that Israel is entitled to secure and recognizedj
borders as part of any settlement.
The senators were joined in their statement by two colleagues,
Sens. Abraham Ribicoff (D-Conn.) and Hubert H. Humphrey (D-:
Minn.).
A SENATE COMMITTEE yesterday charged that campus dis-
orders have been stirred up by groups seeking to create "rebellion,
revolution and eventual destruction of the 'system'."
The report of the Committee on Government Operations statedj
that failure of campus administrators to deal with legitimate griev-
ances "often has led students to question the effectiveness of using
appropriate channels and legitimate effort."

minister
BELFAST, Northern I r e-
land U) - Businessman Brian
Faulkner took the oath as
' Prime Minister of Northern
Ireland yesterday summoning
h i s countrymen to "unite
against the terror" that has
stalked the province for al-
most three years.
He made clear that if his ad-
ministration fails to pacify the
riot-torn streets and crush urban
"~~'~"' guerrilla gunmen "utter disaster"
- direct rule from London -- lies
ahead.
Faulkner, 50, beat off a chal-
lenge by William Craig, champion
of Protestant ascendency and op-
ponent of far reaching civil rights
reforms demanded by the British
government to pacify the 500,000
Catholics among Ulster's 1% mil-
lion people.
The showdown in the fight for
a successor to Maj. James Chi-
chester-Clark came yesterday in
acaucus ofht h e parliamentary
group of the Protestant-based
Unionist party.
From the 31 Unionist members
of the 52-seat Northern Ireland
parliament, the Stormont, Faulk-
ner won 26 votes and Craig four.
Faulkner, who did not vote, thus
became leader of the Unionists in
parliament, and as it is the big-
'gest political party in the legis-
lature, automatically prime minis-
ter.
ciated Press It was a decisive victory. Craig,
[constitu- 46-year-old lawyer, counts his
a coun- main support among the party
grass roots, not in parliament cir-
cles. And it is from there that his
second, and major, challenge will
come next week.
On Monday, 900 top Unionists
from throughout the province
meet to choose the leader of their
movement. Traditionally, t h e y
have swung behind the p r i m e
minister as head of the parlia-
ment party. The odds a r e that
they will do so again.
vent is rati- But t h e verdict on Faulkner
have to es- will not be in the fact of his beat-
lectoral ma- ing Craig - but by how many
ral elections votes. If Craig can muster a large
d local elec- body of support it will pose a
clear warning to Faulkner: If he
elming sup- strays too far along the path of
the amend- moderation he c a n be brought
attacked by down by forces outside parliament.
nters. Rep. If Faulkner loses Monday he
Z-Calif.) said will stay prime minister but with-
strating the out a popular base.
in o d e r n Faulkner pledged he will not
approving it. lead a "punitive, jackboot" re-
because the gime. But it will be swift and de-
* demand it cisive in dealing with troublemak-
to say no," ers, he said.
ncern that m
ents will be
-cal ouegovern-

-Asso
REP. EMANUEL CELLER (D-N.Y.), right, on his way to the Capitol to vote on a proposed
tional amendment that would lower the voting age to 18. With him is Benjamin Zelenko
sellor for the House Judiciary Committee.
House passes vote at i
proposal to go to sta,

UGANDA'S MILITARY GOVERNMENT published a decree
yesterday suspending all political activity for two years.
The decree bars gatherings, processions, flags, documents and
uniforms that could be connected with political organizations.

a

I.

U
TWO CHABROL MASTERPIECES
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST !"
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. an exquisitely detailed, impeccably
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a perfect movie."
-The New Yorker
Emanuelt LWo presents
AN AWED ARTISTS FILM
Caude Chobrots
COLOR
BY DELUXE
with
STEPHANE AUDRAN- MICHEL BOUQUET- MICHEL DUCHAUSSOY. MAURICE RONET
Produced by ANDRE GENOVES -Wrtten and Directed by CLAUDE CHABRO.
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Penalties for violating the decree are 18 months in jail, a $1,400 WASHINGTON ( P) - A proposed,
fine or both. constitutional a m e n d m e n t that l
, * would lower the voting age in all
THOUSANDS OF TOURISTS AND SKIERS stranded in Alpine eltions to 18 won final Congres-
sional approval yesterday as it
resorts since Saturday by heavy snow and avalanches were brought passed the House.
food and medicine yesterday by helicopters. It must now win the approval of
Macugnaga, in the western Alps, was isolated after a huge ava- at least 28 state legislatures before1
lanche blocked the road, trapping nearly 4,000 persons. it can be incorporated into the Con-
The death toll has risen to seven since the avalanches struck Sun- stitution as the 26th Amendment.(
day. Scientists say that the avalanches were due to snow melting be- Minnesota and Delaware legisla
cause of warm winds from Africa. tures, acting within an hour after
- t 'the House vote, both lodged claim1
to the distinction of being the first i

states to ratify. They were fol-
lowed closely by Tennessee, Con-'
necticut and Washington.
Backers of the amendment hope
the ratification process can be
completed in time for the newly
enfranchised young voters to par-
ticipate in the 1972 elections. The'
process normally takes about 15
months.
Congress passed a law last year
lowering the voting age to 18 but
the Supreme Court held it valid
only for federal elections. Unless

THE WHITE HOUSE received a telephoned bomb threat yes- 4
terday afternoon but a careful search which followed proved futile.
The Secret Service reported "a young male voice" telephoned thel
White House switchboard at about 1:10 P.M. to say that a bomb had
been placed in the executive mansion.
PRESENTS
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
REPRISE RECORDING ARTISTS
Medieval Rock, Head Folk, Loments from Space
FRI.-MON. $2.00 330 Maynard St.
MARCH 26-29 8 P.M. 665-0606

tlv L11G Ulat'lllt~trltlll tll UU1116 tJLIU lllatt

Senate-to vote on SST,
Mansfield sees defeat

WASHINGTON (/P) - Senate
Majority Leader Mike M a n s -
field predicts defeat for the sup-
ersonic transport (SST) which
comes up for senate vote today.
Mansfield commented yester-
day as the final debate began.
with SST opponents summing
up their arguments, that the
1,800-mile an hour plane will
pollute the atmosphere, dam-
age fish and wildlife, cause un-
bearable noise and even bring on
an increase in skin cancer.
Backers of the plane count-
tered with arguments that na-
tional prestige is at stake, along
with a favorable balance of pay-
ments, the future of the U.S.
aerospace industry and thous-
ands of jobs.
At least one of the less than
one dozen undecided members
who apparenty hod the key -
Sen. James Buckley (Conserva-
tive - R., N.Y.) - had a late
afternoon meeting with the
President.

Nixon also issued an appeal
through Senate Republican
Leader Hugh Scott after a two
hour meeting with GOP c o n -
gressional leaders and other top
administration officials at the
White House.
The Pennsylvania senator said
the President showed "g r e a t
emphasis and great determina-
tion" in stating his support for a
continued federal role in SST
development and for overturn-
ing a House vote against t h e
project.
An Associated Press survey
showed 48 senators opposed out-
right or.leaning that way; 41 for
the SST or leaning, and nine
uncommitted. Two ailing senat-
ors are not expected to vote.
Nixon's new science advisor
said that if Congress denies
more funds for the supersonic
jetliner, "we may have to g e t
foreign capital and private cap-
ital" to put a prototype in the
air.

the proposed amendm
fied many states will
tablish two sets of e:
chinery, one for fede
and one for state and
tions.
Despite the overwh
port in the House for
ment it was bitterly
some of the dissei
Charles E. Wiggins (R
Congress was demon
"permissiveness" of
American society by a
"It will pass solely
young people affected
and we lack the will
said Wiggins.
Others expressed con
college towns the stud
able to take over the l
ment because they wil
the regular residents.
The supporters of t.
confident they had the
content to leave the
the opponents and fe
floor during the brie
luster debate.
Nine states now have
under 21, but only thri
ered it to 18-Georgia
and Alaska. In Hawaii
Nebraska it is 20, and i
setts, Minnesota, and
is 19.
There are an estim
lion -young Americans
and 21 who would be
vote under the new ag
The Michigan Daily, edi
aged by students at the
Michigan. News phone: 76
Class postage paid at Ann
igan, 420 Maynard St.,
Michigan 48104. Publishes
day through Sunday mox
city year. Subscriptionx
carrier, $10 by ,mail.
Summer Session publi
through Saturday morni
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $

1 outnumber
he resolution
votes, were
rhetoric to
w took the
f and lack-
voting ages
ee have low-
i, Kentucky,
, Maine and
n Massachu-
Montana it
ated 11 mil-
between 18
eligible to
e limit.
ted and man-
University of
4-0552. Second
Arbor, Mich-
Ann Arbor,
d daily Tues-
rrnlng Ujniver-
rates: $10 by
shed Tuesday.
ng. Subscrip-
5 by mail.

pollution suit,
SRI
WASHINGTON (M)-A suit by
the state of Ohio seeking to pro-
tect Lake Erie from mercury pol-
lution- was thrown out of the Su-
preme Court yesterday in a ruling
that indicated the justices 'ere
narrowing their own jurisdiction.
Justice John M. Harlan said that
while'the Constitution plainly gives
Ohio the right to have the Supreme
Court judge the dispute, the Court's
role has been changing to the point
where justices cannot "devote
truly enormous portions of our
energy to such matters."
The suit called for a permanent
injunction against the discharge of
mercury compounds into Lake
Erie tributaries.
Harlan noted that justices are
not science experts. He suggested
Ohio take its suit against the Dow
Chemical Co. of Canada and Wy-
andotte Chemicals Corp. of Wyan-
dotte, Mich. to an Ohio State court
under the common law of nuisance.

RADICAL FILM SERIES

Alan Bates

Hayley Mills

in

WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND
Wednesday Only!

75c

Canterbury House

7-9-11 p.m.

Battle of Algiers
Saturday and Sunday
331 Thompson, 7-9:15 p.m.
(A Newsreel-Magic House Benefit-$1)
NEXT WEDNESDAY
Vilgot ("I Am Curious-Yellow") SJOMAN'S "491"

i
,::
i2I
t .

THE ECOLOGY CENTER'S
SEMINAR SERIES:
"Living With the Earth"
PRESENTS:
"The Religious Aspects & Political Implications
of the Environmental Movement"
7:30 p.m. UGLI Multipurpose Room
WED., MARCH 24 Dr. Roy Rappaport

0

410

I

.... . . {. t.-::2- .r xiY3t?: .Y::.... :4::"!.}.. }.:..::" '
.. . . .... ... .:t. .. .. .... ...v.. . .{. .... . ...v.. :. .. " ... .. rW }.}::... .... .'..
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
4 SCHOOL OF MUSIC and DEPARTMENT OF ART
present KURT WEILL'S OPERA
THE THREE PENNY OPERA
}i~f Y ...fIii~

"

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