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March 23, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-23

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*sday, March 23, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

F ~sday, March 23, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Sout to lunch
mort noveik
A win, but
it could have been bigger
NEW YORK
MICHIGAN SHOULD HAVE blown Syracuse right out of Madi-
son 'Square Garden in last Sunday's N.I.T. opening round
game. The final score showed only a six-point difference between
the teams and it shouldn't have. The Wolverines had several op-
portunities to end the game long before the final buzzer, but they
just couldn't take advantage of them.
As coach Johnny Orr told the mob of reporters outside the
Michigan lockerroom, "We had a chance to blow them out
but we got fancy and blew it." Inside the lockerroom Ernie
Johnson added that, "Sure we tried to blow them out. We
could .have done it in the first half and skipped the rest but
they got a little spark and wouldn't die.
The Wolverine's first big chance to squash the Orange came
with about twelve minutes left in the first half. With the score
tied at 15 apiece Michigan ran off 13 straight points before Syra-
cuse scored again. With the score 28-15 Dan Fife fouled Tom
Green while going in for a fast break basket and that destroyed
the Michigan momentum. Syracuse closed to within eight before
the half ended with the Wolverines up by 10, 43-33.
Within two minutes of the start of the second half Ken Brady
picked up his fourth foul, and went to' the bench to watch the
Michigan lead evaporate. Johnson did a good job of keeping
Syracuse's center, Bill Smith, away from his offensive board,
but couldn't rebound with him on the other one.
The lead shrank to four before the Wolverines got rolling
again. They increased the lead back to 11, 60-49, but then
blew four chances to make it even bigger. Henry Wilmore
missed a jump shot, Fife threw the ball away, Ford missed a
free throw and Wilmore missed another shot in quick succes-
sion.
At that point their sloppyness only cost Michigan a chance
C for a 19 point lead, but it shdrtly allowed to Orange to get back in
the game. Wilmore and Fife both got caught walking with the
ball, and Ernie Johnson blew a layup and suddenly the match
became a real contest.
The Wolverine's also lost points at the free throw line in the
second period. After making 7 of 7 in the first half they couldn't
sink them when they needed them in the second. It hurt espe-
cially because they missed several times in bonus situations when
40they could have used the extra points to crush the Orange.
In addition to the Wolverines' failure to keep their game
together, the Orange also received help from the officials. The
New York referees were definitely not hospitable in the open-
ing minutes of the game.
At the end of the contest Syracuse had 22 personals to Michi-
gan's 21, but the totals are not an accurate reading of the fouls
called. Many of the Orangemen's 16 personals in the second half
were offensive fouls, which meant that the Wolverines didn't get
a chance at the line. Only one of the 22 fouls called on Michigan
was offensive, Syracuse went to the line for the other 21.
When the game began it appeared that the local refs were pre-
tared to do a New York hose Job on the Wolverines. Michigan
picked up five fouls, including two each on Ken Brady and Rod
Ford, before Syracuse picked up its first. The officials put the
Orange in the bonus situation with nine minutes left in the half
and when the horn sounded Michigan had 11 personals to Syra-
cuse's five.
The fouls were especially painful as two key players, Brady
and Fife, each had three by the end of the period. Brady picked
up his fourth at the beginning of the second half. With him on the
Pbench Smith, who hit for only eight in the opening 20 minutes, be-
gan hitting from inside and finished with 27.
Syracuse also began sweeping the boards, preventing the
second Michigan shot while ensuring their own. It wasn't that
Johnson played poorly because he didn't. He just didn't have the
size to fight with the bigger Smith.
Michigan also hurt themselves from the floor. They shot
well below their normal 45 per cent. Wilmore was only 9 for
25. As he said,. "I was missing shots that I usually don't miss."
Ford was only three for nine and Fife five for 12.
Wayne Grabiec was the only player whose shot was really
on. He hit 8 of 16 on the court and 5 for 5 at the line and 21 points.
His outside shooting saved Michigan from the Orange zone.
However, despite all the chances the Wolverines blew to
squeeze the Orange out into Seventh Avenue, they can't take all
the credit for not winning by a bigger margin. Syracuse, at times,
played very effectively, especially on defense.
Though Orr denied it, Syracuse's full court press gave the
Wolverines trouble. They lost the ball once when Wayne Grabiec
couldn't get the ball in bounds within five seconds and again when
they couldn't get it past half court in ten ticks. Syracuse also
picked off several passes and in general made nuisances of them-
selves.

According to Grabiec, "they pressed the ball real well. We
usually don't have problems with a press. Maybe we were
scared to make bad passes or something."
Fife conjectured that, "maybe it was just carelessness. We
made some sloppy, careless mistakes."

Hawaii edges Sooners in NIT,

Duke,
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Big Bob Nash
rifled in a field goal and little Tom
Newell threw in two killing free
throws in the second overtime to
pace scrappy Hawaii to an 88-87
victory over Oklahoma in the first
round of the National Invitation
Basketball Tournament last night.
The Rainbows, playing for the
first time in this tournament, rub-
bed out a 14-point Oklahoma lead
with a second-half charge led by
Nash, who scored 11 points in the
second 20 minutes as Hawaii
stormed back to tie the score 73-all
at the end of regulation time.
Neither team was able to pene-

Iarheels reach semis

fense in the first overtime, which 3
ended 77-all. But. John Peneback-
er's hot hand at the start of the i
second extra session helped Hawaii.
The sharpshooting guard contribu-
ted five points to give the Rainbows
an 84-77 lead.
The Sooners pulled within 84-83
but Nash hit his field goal and
Newell's two free throws with 10
second sealed the verdict.1
* * *
Tarheels trample

NEW YORK -
became the first
Conference teamE
semifinal berth in

North Carolina
Atlantic Coast
ever to land a
the National In-

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN PAPANEK
vidence 86-79 last night behind
Dave Chadwick's 22 points.
The Tar Heel s' victory at Madi-
son Square Garden earned them a
berth Thursday night against the
winner of tonight's third game be-
tween Tennessee and Duke.
With Chadwick and Bill Cham-
berlain leading the charge, the Tar
Heels broke away from a 37-34
halftime lead to open a 59-49 spread
midway through the second half.
But Ernie DiGregorio, who
scored 18 of his 23 points in the
second half, led a Providence rally
that brought the Friars to within
five at 84-79 with less than 30 sec-
onds to play. But North Carolina's
slowdown tactics kept the ball
away from Providence for the most
part in the waning minutes.
Chamberlain added 19 points for
the Tar Heels, now 24-6, and Vic

Collucci had 17 for Providence. The
Friars finished 20-8.
Blue Devils blaze
NEW YORK -Brutish R a n d y
Denton bedeviled Tennessee with
32 points and 17 rebounds to lead
the Duke Blue Devils to a 78-64
victory last night and into the
semi-finals of the National Invita-
tion Basketball Tournament.
Duke's rebound power propelled
the Blue Devils into a 41-34 lead
late in the first half, but Tennes-
see's deliberate offense wiped that
out and the Volunteers closed the
gap to 41-40 on Dick Johnston's
layup at the buzzer.
The 6-fot-10, 240-pound Denton
then took command in the second
half, scoring 14 points, blocking
numerous Tennessee shots and
picking off nine rebounds a n d
Duke joined Carolina as the first
ACC teams ever to reach the semi-
finals.
Denton triggered the Blue Dev-
ils to a 10-point lead before Ten-
nessee made things interesting
with an 11-5 spurt that brought
the Vols within 64-60.
Duke's big center then cashed
inn a three-point play with 11/2
minutes left to give the winners
a safe 70-62 lead.

trate the other's tough zone de- i vitation Tournament, beating Pro-
I I

-Associated Press
SYRACUSE ORANGEMAN Tom Green tries to get around Wol-
verine Wayne Grabiec in the first half of Sunday's first-round
game in the National Invitation Tournament in New York. Mich-
igan squeezed past Syracuse, 82-76, to win a semi-final berth
Wednesday night against Georgia Tech.
Burton KOs twelve,
Is N Colorado, -

Special To The Daily
TUCSON-Buoyed by a superb
12 strikeout pitching performance
from Jim Burton, the Michigan
baseball team bounced back from
a weekend doubleheader loss at
the hands of Adams State' College
to defeat Northern Colorado, 1-0.
Burton also pitched a three hitl
shutout on Friday, while striking'
out 13 batters. He has now pitch-
ed 14 scoreless innings and has
fanned 25 opponents.
Besides his 12 strikeouts in yes-i
terday's contest, Burton threw out'
three other men so that he had a
hand in 15 of the 21tputouts.
The Wolverines scored what
proved to be the winning run in
the third inning when Mark Car-
row doubled to left center with
one out. Mike Bowen then singled
to right scoring Carrow.

MICHIGAN

Carrow 3b
Bowen cf
Kettinger If
Lonchar c
Rafferty ss
Sullivan lb
DeCou rf
Ball Zb
Burton p
T

ab
3
3
f3
3
3
1
1
2
2
Totals 21

r
i l
i 4
0
0
0
1

h
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Q
a
z

NORTHERN
Grantz ss
Cooper f
Buchfield cf
Scavardalf If
Hamilton c
England c
Haskett lb
Mizner 3b
Nicks 2b
Harper p
Totals
Northern
Colorado
Michigan

COLORADO
1 0 1
3 0 0
3 0 0
2 0 9
2 0 0
1 0 9
3 0 0
3 0 0
3 0 1
2 0s0 0
23 0 2

bi
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
0
0

Ali drugged, doctor charges;
Bears' stadium bid doomed
By The Associated Press
0 CHERRY HILL, N.J. - Muhammad Ali termed as "silly"
and "ridiculous" yesterday a report by a British doctor that Ali
may have been doped in losing his heavyweight title fight to
Joe Frazier.
"I am not saying Clay doped himself," the doctor wrote, re-
ferring to Ali by his Christian and not his Muslim name. "He
could have been doped without knowing anything about it ...
In all the major fights I have seen Clay I have never seen him
move soslowly."
* * *
* CHICAGO - The Big Ten has rejected for a second
time Northwestern University's proposal to play in Dyche Sta-
dium.
The action Sunday doomed for the foreseeable future the
Bears' hopes of moving their National League home games to
Dyche Stadium and did nothing to lessen the financial plight of
Northwestern.
* * *
1 REVERE, Mass.- Wayne Cashman of the Boston Bruins
suffered minor injuries yesterday in an automobile accident on
the Revere Beach Parkway.
THE ECOLOGY CENTER'S
SEMINAR SERIES:
"Living With the Earth"
PRESENTS:
"The Religious Aspects & Political Implications
of the Environmental Movement"
7:30 p.m. UGLI Multipurpose Room
WED., MARCH 24 Dr. Roy Rappoport

HEAR
PROF. ABRAHAM KAPLAN
Dept. of Philosophy
-ON-
"My Experience at the World Conference
on Soviet Jewry in Brussels"
This Thurs., March 25, 8 P.M.
at: SHALOM HOUSE
1429 H ILL ST. 663-4129
'i'-
- - ~ mwt

E

V|

000 000 0-0 2 1
001 000 x-1 2 1

Learn ussialnn IB
The Department of Slavic Languages may offer
intensive first-year Russian during the sumnmer
half-term (June 30 to August 19th) if there is
sufficient interest. Classes will meet 10-12, 1-3
five days a week. Eight hours credit. Material cov-
ered is equivalent to Russian 101 and 102. Call the I
department (764-5355) and provide name and
phone before March 30 if interested.
.4. ... .. .. .. ... ....... ..,.,..... .x.;iS : ?:;y2,. . :... ....v .. .. ..'ak". .* . :. ' y +={,.;*....+&... . .. .
University Activities Center.
presents
SCreative, Arts Festival 17
j Vietnam Photo Display
Undergraduate Library Lobby
March 20-April 1
SUndergraduate Art Show
Rackham Gallery-3rd floor
March 15-March 31
J . . . . .

SCOTTY'S HAMBURGER
20c
sizzling & satisfying
S6cotts
3362 Washtenaw St. (Just up from Arborlanid),

Announcing the opening of a new store
ALBATROSS

I

Home Furnishings-
Beanbag Chairs
Candles
Tapestries

Lamps
Pillows
Rugs

Waterbeds

I

524 E. William at Maynard
MON.-THURS. 10-6
FRI. 10-8:30
SAT. 10-7

I

Sony Model 20
Makes Driving a Pleasure

Easy to Operate-
Easy on Your Purse
u N SPERSCOPEs

gerstop
Yanks with
Collins' HR
LAKELAND, Fla. (R) - Kevin
Collins cracked a pinch two-run
homer in the bottom of the, 11th
inning to give the Detroit Tigers
a 5-4 exhibition victory over the
New York Yankees yesterday.
ANew York had carried a 2-1
lead into the Tiger ninth, but
Gates Brown singled, took third on
another Stanley single and then
scored on a fielder's choice.
The Yankees got a run in the
tenth on a double steal, but Bill
Fv eehan doubled home Willie Hor-
t mn in the Tiger half of the inning
to once again tie the score.

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
T h e Guadalajara S u m m e r
School, a fully accredited Uni-
versity of Arizona program, will
offer, July 5 to August 14, art,
folklore, geography, history, po-
litical science, language and lit-
erature courses. Tuition, $160;
boarduand room, $155.Write
Dr. Juan B. Rael, Office of
Summer Session, University of
Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 85721.

HI-Ft BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
618 S. MAIN 769-4700
"Quality Sound Through Quality Equipment"

N

.. ................ - - -- .........................

/
I'

Era fsmnel '3n Lealher
343 MAYNARC ST. ANN ARBOR
FIRE CROIFTSBORN

onitat 7:30 pm
A LECTURE ON
syceec Dru gs and the Future of Rel igion"
Professor Walter H. Clark
-author of CHEMICAL ECSTASY
an early colleague of Timothy Leary
-consultant to the continuing medical research

ULRICH'S
BOOKSTORE
NOW UNDER NEW
Ownership

m

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