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January 12, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

* Tuesday, January 12, 197T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Seven

pt""1v.rc~ak

11

the r
upper deck

! I

Soul searching

in the cellar

By RICK CORNFELD
"It is time to sit back and look at the individuals on the
team," Bernie Gagnon said of his fellow Wolverine icers, "and
see where we're missing the boat."
Gagnon refused to criticize his mates, but it is clear some-
thing is wrong. The hockey team just dropped a weekend set to
Michigan State, 6-5 and 5-4, and sunk to the cellar in the
Western Collegiate Hockey Association.
On the surface, the major problems with the team are the
depressing number of penalties and the defensive lapses.
Saturday, the Wolverines received 14 penalties, including
two each to Punch Cartier and Mike Jarry in the last six
minutes of play.
Accordingto coach Al Renfrew, the penalties are a result
of the team's eagerness to win. "They're over-anxious, and when
you're losing you start pressing," said Renfrew, who added that
many of the infractions are marginal calls.
Cartier's penalties, one for tripping and one for roughing,
were particularly a result of being too eager to win. The tripping
penalty saved a' Spartan goal. Then, said Cartier, "this guy
(M8's Jerry DeMarco) started mocking me. I was mad at the
way things were going and kind of depressed. I just felt like
kicking shit out of him."
Two minutes later Jarry was sent off with one penalty each
for cross-checking and roughing. After the first penalty, Jarry
started fighting with Bob Boyd and both were thrown off the
ice. It was a smart move because instead of being short two men,
' the Wolverines were down three skaters to four. "I was trying to
get somebody else," Jarry said. "I got in the fight for the team."
The Wolverines not only received more penalties in the
two games than the Spartans, but they were outshot by 27.
"That's just one of those deals," said captain Paul Gamsby,
who explained that MSU dumps the puck into the opposing
zone and receives credit for many shots that don't mean
anything.
Still, the defense has been a problem, as the Wolverines'
offensive minded defensemen have moved up the ice to try and
score and the forwards have failed to come back and cover for
them by back-checking. "We're making big, mistakes coming out
of our own zone," one player said.
But the problems with penalties and defense may just be
symptoms of a more serious disease. "These things are all inside
the team," one member said.
Several players feel there is a problem with lack of team
play on the ice. "We're not playing together," is one common
sentiment among team members. "Guys are working," said a
player, "but they're not working together."
Many players feel that the team is not passing the puck
around, but according to Renfrew "the judge is not passing, but
passing quickly enough."
Renfrew said some players may want to win so much that
they don't pass or pass too late because they are trying to do
everything themselves. Many members of the team support this
view. "Some guys are so wrapied up in the game," said a player,
"that they want to do it all themselves, instead of looking
around. The guys gotta settle down more and they have to think
more, instead of getting too wrapped up."
Another player said, "We do not relax enough on the ice.
You catch five guys all going after the puck at the same time."
Some players also feel that the team spirit could be
better. "That's what the guys are saying," one member
remarked, "that our spirit is not what it used to be."
The team is not a rah-rah squad. Gagnon explained, "Some
people have to express themselves and some don't. Some are
not made like that."
If anything is the matter with the spirit, it is not that the
team cares too little, however, but the opposite. "You want to
win so much," said one player, "that you make bad plays."
"Our guys are so dispirited," said another, "they don't
know what to do. They try so much to win they miss plays."
"The team couldn't get much better as far as attitude
is concerned," Renfrew said. "They may not have as much
ability as some of the stars we've had in the past, but you
couldn't ask for more desire."
The players have as much respect for Renfrew as he does
for them. When a team is going bad, many fans cry for the
coach's scalp, but almost to a man the team members have
nothing but praise for their mentor. "The coach is a very fine
person," is a common statement of the players.
An incident in practice last week is a good illustration
of the feeling the team has for Renfrew. Renfrew was
chewing out one of the players, and the individual involved
wanted to argue and started to answer back. But just as
he began to retaliate, the rest of the team jumped on him
and silenced him. "He's the coach," some of the players said.
Like their coach, most of the team thinks it will improve
quickly. The squad is not missing by much-it has lost three
straight games by one goal each. "This is not a last place
team," several players said. Whether the team can prove that
statement is another matter.
* WCHA Standings

Courts
Baseballs
exenmption
sustained
WASHINGTON OP) - The Su-
preme Court refused 8 to 1 yes-!
terday to take a new look at its
nearly half-century-old doctrine
that baseball, unlike other big-
business team sports-is not sub-
ject to federal antitrust laws.
By declining to take the case
the high court virtually killed the -
suit of two former American
League umpires, Alexander J. Sa-
lerno and William Valentine, who
contend they were fired for trying
to organize a union.
Manhattan U.S. District Court

investigate

Grand jury probes pro football;
ex-stars give blacklist testimony

pro

sports

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
TERRI FOUCHEY'
Judge Thomas F. Croake threw
out the case Dec. 10, 1969 and was
upheld by they Circuit Court last
July 13.
Since the 1953 decision, which
left to Congress whether to extend,
anti-trust laws to baseball, the
Supreme Court has rendered de-
cisions putting professional box-
ing, football and basketball under
the laws.
"This court is now presented
with the anomalous situation of
organized baseball's being granted
an exemption from antitrust laws
despite its admitted interstate ac-
tivities and revenues mounting at
an astounding annual rate," the
umpires' lawyers said in their
brief.
Lawyers for Kuhn and Cronin
said Congress on past occasions
had passed bills to exempt base-
ball-but not other sports-from
antitrust laws, although such a
bill never passed both houses in
the same session and so failed to
become law. They said this was
evidence of Congress' intent to
leave baseball outside the laws.4

CLEVELAND (P) - William A.
"Dub" Jones, former Cleveland
Browns' star, said yesterday he
told a federal grand jury he didn't
think there was blacklisting or
racial discrimination in the Na-
tional Football League.
Jones, 46, was the leadoff wit-
ness yesterday before the anti-
trust jury, which resumed sessions
after a holiday recess called Dec.
18.
Jones told newsmen he did not
think his testimony was very help-
ful to the jury. "I probably j u s t
reaffirmed some positions t h e y
already had."
Jones, now a building materials
dealer and general contractor in
Ruston, La., said blacklisting of
players was "basically what they
are (the jury) investigating."
Jones said that players who have
contended they were blacklisted
might be "players along the end of
the line in their playing careers
and history followed with them."
Earlier witnesses since the jury
sessions began in November have
included several former players
who contended they were black-
listed and kept from playing pro
ball in the NFL.
Witnesses have indicated t h e
jury is concentrating on player-
owner relations in a search for
possible illegal restraints of trade,
which could bringcriminal indict-
ments.
Former pro star Claude "Buddy"

Young. now handling player rela-
tions work for the National Foot-
ball League, was also called to tes-
tify before the grand jury yester-
day.
Young, the first NFL staff mem-
ber to appear before the jury, was
escorted to the Federal building
by Cleveland Browns' attorney
Thomas Meany and Paul Tagla-
gue, an attorney for the NFL.
Young, who played for the old

Coaches kill one-platoon;
keep 25-second play limit

New York Yankees and D a l1 a s
Texans before joining Baltimore
of the NFL in 1953, had no im-
mediate comment on his appear-
ance before the jury.
Young told newsmen after tes-
tifying that he answered all ques-
tions but he wouldn't elaborate on
the nature of the jury's questions.
"The league has asked me not
to comment on what was said,"
Young said.

-Associated Press
You're the wrestling coach?

HOUSTON {P) - The R ule s
Recommendations Committee of
the American Football Coaches
Association, voted down yesterday
a proposal for a limited substitu-
tion rule that would bring back
one platoon football.
The coaches also rejected a
change in the time permitted to
put the ball in play from 25 to 30
seconds.
They approved changes that
would :
--make a kickoff, punt or field
goal attempt that bounces in the
end zone before being touched by
a member of the receiving team
a touchback.
-make offensive pass interfer-
ence in the end zone a 15-yard
penalty rather than an automatic
touchdown which gives the ball to1

the defensive team. Such is the
case now, even on first down. The
penalty also would apply to the
touching of a pass in the end zone
by an ineligible receiver.
-make the requirements for
possession of a live ball after a
fumble the same as those for a
pass reception. In other words, the
player recovering the ball must
return to the ground in bounds to
establish possession.
"The coaches are very much
satisfied with the rules in gen-
eral." said Jack Curtuce, chair-
man of the AFCA's Rules Recom-
mendations Committee.
Yesterday's proposals will be
sent to the Football Rules Coni-
mittee of the NCAA for further
action.

Wrestling Coach Mrs. Clara Shub instructs Dale Eisman and
Monte Sheets in some of the finer points of the sport. Mrs.
Shub, who also teaches vocal and instrumental music at the 90
student Linwood High School in Linwood, Kansas, accepted the
position when several of the boys wanted to compete and none
of the male staff members felt able to handle the job.
ON CO STATUS:

Court grants Ai appeal

By The Associated Press
The Supreme Court granted a
hearing yesterday to heavyweight
fighter Muhammed Ali on his
claim that he was entitled to ex-
emption from the draft as a reli-
gious conscientious objector.
The court'sdaction, announced
in a brief order, clears the way,
for Ali's fight in March with Joe
Frazier for the heavyweight box-
ing championship.

Professional League Standings

Ali, also known as Cassius Clay,
was convicted 3% years ago for
refusing induction into the Army.
He claimed he was entitled to an
exemption as a Muslim minister.
His conviction carried a five-
year sentence, and boxing officials
stripped him of the title he had
won from Sonny Liston.
Had the court turned down Ali's
appeal it would have been highly
unlikely that the fight with Fra-
zier would have been held.
The bout, scheduled for New
York City on March 8, will be the
richest in history. Ali made a fight
comeback last October, scoring
a technical knockout over Jerry
Quarry and continued with a
knockout victory in December
over Oscar Bonavena.
In the appeal, Ali's lawyers
claimed government wire-tappers
listened in on his private tele-
phone conversations. The appeal
also challenged the validity of or-
ders from what All called a "lily-
white" Selective Service System.
But, in granting review, the
court limited its consideration to'

the single point whether the gov-
ernment was wrong in character-
izing Ali's objections to Army duty
as "political and racial" rather
than "religious."
Ali, contacted in Philadelphia,
stated, "I'm relieved, now I can
concentrate on the fight," upon
learning that the U.S. Supreme
Court had given him a chance to
upset his conviction for refusing
induction.
"I am happy, very happy that
the Supreme Court has agreed to
hear the case and eliminate any
problem with the fight," he said.
"Now I am going to show who
the real champion of the world
is."
A Supreme Court ruling, most
likey in June, that he was wrong-
fully denied reclassification as a
conscientious objector and Black
Muslim minister would send the'
case back to Ali's draft board
where is would die.

P PHYSICS 400
"ENERGY and MAN"
A student-faculty seminar to survey problems associated with
energy consumption, such as reserves of energy resources, various
means of power production, projecting energy needs, and environ-
mental consequences of energy consumption. Prerequisites: senior
class standing and permission of the instructor. Course open to
students in social sciences, engineering, and physical sciences.
CLASSES: M-W, 12-1 in Room 413 of the
Physics and Astronomy Bldg.
Instructor: Robert Williams, office 1065 Randall, 764-3426
Sea rain
AND
DAVID BROMBERG
in concert this Saturday, Jan. 16
8:30 p.m. Hill Auditorium
TICKETS ON SALE BEGINNING TODAY
$2.50, $3.00, and $3.50 UNION LOBBY
DISCOUNT RECORDS
PRESENTED BY
I e

NBA
Eastern Conference.
Atlantic Division
W L Pct.
New York 32 14 .696
Boston 26 19 .578
Philadelphia 27 20 .574
Buffalo 12 35 .255
Central Division
Baltimore 26 17 .605
Cincinnati 19 23 .452
Atlanta 14 32 .304
Cleveland 6 44 .120
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 35 7 .833
Detroit 30 16 .652
Chicago 26 18 .591
Phoenix 26 21 .553
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 24 19 .558
San Francisco 25 23 .521
San Diego 23 24 .489
Seattle 21 25 .457
Portland 15 31 .326
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Game

Vancouver
Detroit
'Buffalo

14 23 4
13 23 4
8 24 7
West Division

33
30
23

GB
51:,
20y,
14
24
7
10
1'%
3
4t
10%

Chicago 27 8 5 59
St. Louis 18 10 12 48
Minnesota 14 19 8 36
Philadelphia 15 19 6 34
Pittsburgh 10 20 11 31
Los Angeles 11 20 8 30
California 12 26 2 26
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
New York at Vancouver
California at St. Louis
Only games scheduled.

114 148
115 164
85 151
155 90
106 100
88 113
99 114
112 121
115 142
101 142

For Lunch or Dinner-STEAKS
at
BEST STEAK HOUSE
SIRLOIN-1 53*
FILET-1.59*

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits......$6.98
(All Colors)
Bells ....$8.50
DENIM

East-West All-Star game at San Diego.

NHL
East Division
W L T
Boston 29 7 5
New York 28 7 6
Montreal 19 13 8
Toronto 20 19 2

Pts. GF GA
63 195 108
62 138 86
46 139 110
42 144 117

TV RENTALS

1

PORK CHOP-1.39"
with Baked Potato, Salad, & Texas Toast
STEAKBURGER-.79
with Baked Potato & Texas Toast
217 S. STATE ST.
(NEXT TO STATE THEATRE)

Bush Jeans
Bells.....
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims

$10.00
$8.00
$7.50
.. $7.00

Michigan Tech
Duluth
Michigan State
North Dakota

Wi L
8 1
7 5
4 4
6 6

T
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.889
.583
.500
.500

Wisconsin
Colorado
Denver
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

5
4
4
3
2

5
5
6
5
6

0
0
0
0
0

.500
.444
.400
.375
.250

$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL.
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

..i

I

11

State Street at Liberty

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY,
Phone 764-0558
Open Only to U of M Students, Faculty, Staff, & immediate families

J'
1'

COMMUNITY SABBATH
FRIDAY, JAN. 15-5 o'clock
THEME: THE SABBATH
AS REVOLUTION

11

COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT

Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open-
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon. -Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 a.m.--Fri.-Sat.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Catering
769-2330

RSVP: Wed., Jan.

13, 4 p.m.

SHALOM HOUSE

IlajV

NASSAU
SPRING VACATION

1429 Hill
Cost of dinner: $1.50

663-4129

VIETNA PEACETREATY
The American government acts to prolong the war so the
American people must take the initiative to end it. The
Vietnamese people have asked us to support them by
making a peace treaty with them.
Bring your imagination, interest, and ideas about what
to do to a meeting and find out what people in Ann Arbor
have begun to do.

$9900

Jet Transportation
from Detroit Metro
(including transfers and taxes)

I

FEB. 26-MAR. 5
0 rA vc . Li n1 f ,u

Administrative Vice-Presidents

.

II

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