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March 21, 1971 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-21

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 21, 1971

Poge Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, March 21, '1971

NEWTON, CLEAVER SPLIT

BlueC
(Continued from Page 1)
of being in what they called "ene-
my territory.'
Even before the dispute vwas
aired on television, the serious-
ness of it had been indicated in
underground newspapers read by
white radical groups which, from
time to time, have formed alli-
ances with the Panthers.
One of the first, signs was an
apen letter" to the white radi-
cal Weathermen from the "Pan-
ther 21." Printed early in Feb-
ruary, it was signed by the 21
New York Panthers facing char-
ges of conspiring to blow up
buildings.
The letter accuses the Oakland
leadership of failing to support
the Weathermen, and added
"They must have all but ignored
us also-so in that respect we
are in similar waters."
"We also very keenly feel the
loss of direction, the confusion
and chaos that is running ram-
pant out there," the letter said.
The direction sought by the
Panther 21 was made clear a few
paragraphs later:
". ..We have had too many
martyrs. We desperately need
more revolutionists who are com-
pletely willing and ready at all
time to KILL to change condi-
tions. Just to be ready to die
does not make a revolutionist-it
just makes a martyr . . Do you
'recall the old 'Ask what you can
do for your country?' Destroy it
-mentally, morally, psychologic-
ally, and physically-destroy it,
and whatever you do-do it good!"
Such a program might once'
have been the first priority of
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official -publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
3 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday ',and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student brganiza-
tion notes are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
Day Calendar
Black Liberation Week: "Black P e r -
spectives on the Media," Aud. A, Angell
Hall, 1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Family Recreation Program: Facul-
ty, staff and married students,, Intra-
mural Sports Bldg., 1:30 p.m. -
.Prof Theatre Prog.: "Siamese Con-
nections," Mendelssohn Theatre, 2:30
p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: Student poetry
readilg, E. Quad, Rm 126, 2 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 22
Senate Assembly Meeting. (contin-
ued): Rackham Amph., 3:15 p.m.
Poll. -Sci. and Ctr for Coord. of An-
cient & 14od. Studies: E. Voegelin,
Stanford U., "The Ecumenic Age," Aud.
A, Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
School of Music: F. Koizumi, Tokyo
U. of Fine Arts, "A Study in Japanese
UIusic," Rackham Amph., 8 p.m.
Prof. Theatre Prog.: "Hadrian VII,"
Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: Silkscreening,
lshbowl (through Mar. 24).
Foreign Visitors
Following Individuals can be reached
through the Foreign Visitor Div., Mi.
PREGNANT?
NEED HELP?
YOUR QUESTIONS ON

ABORTION
CAN ONLY BE FULLY
ANSWERED BY
PROFESSIONALS
CALL (215) 878-5800
24 hours 7 days
FOR TOTALLY
CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION
Legal Abortions Without Delay

Panthers

face

party dissension

-Associated Press
BOBBY SEALE, Black Panther party chairman, leaves a jail for
the opening of his trial for murder in New Haven, Conn. Seale

are more women in this chapter
than men."
The Chicago chapter was ac-
tively developing new programs
and forging coalitions with Puer-
to Rican, other poor white and
radical white groups until its
chairman, Fred Hampton, was
killed by police in December
1969. Since then, the programs
seem to have come to a halt.
- In Los Angeles, three Panther
offices were abandoned after
clashes with police, and head-
quarters have been reported
moved to nearby Compton.
"The police actions have
stifled the Panthers in terms of
their being an active force in the
community," said Los Angeles
Panther attorney Luke McKis-
sack. "So much of their leader-
ship is in jail. It's cut down on
their recruiting. But it's helped
more black people come to see
the problems with police."
In New Haven, Conn., where
Bobby Seale faces charges of
aiding and abetting the murder
of a New York Panther, a raid
and a series of arrests in the
case all but decimated the local
chapter two years ago. But the
party's activities took on new
life there when members-in-
cluding national Panther leaders
-began organizing demonstra-
tions and collecting money to
support Seale and the others.
Similar reports of Panther dif-
ficulties have come from New
Orleans, Houston, Indianapolis,
Winston - Salem, N.C., Des
Moines, Iowa, and several other
cities.
Membership is also a problem,

partly because police have man-
aged to infiltrate panther ranks.
In addition to clashes with po-
lice, a series of purges begun in
1969 has removed both rank-and-
file party members and some
leaders.
Earl Anthony, once deputy
minister of education, was ex-
pelled in 1969 after he contended
that racism, and not class strug-
gle as the party maintained, was
the basic problem in America.
The Panthers don't talk about
their membership. The Justice
Department has estimated cur-
rent membership at under 1,000,
down from a peak strength 18
months ago of 1,500 to 2,000.
Almost from the party's be-
ginning, there has been a con-
flict between military and politi-
cal actions. Many members pre-
ferred to emphasize guns, rather
than political coalitions with
white organizations.
Both Newton and Cleaver have
repeatedly said the party must
not be racist, that it must work
with whites. But they have dif-
fered on how and for what ends.
During a series of campus
tours this year, Newton stressed
what he called "revolutionary in-
tercommunalism," saying the
party believes national bounda-
ries must be abolished in favor of
world government within a so-
cialist framework free of racism
and the exploitation of capitalis-
tic competition.
But, he told the Panthers' revo-
lutionary peoples constitutional
convention, that goal may have
to be passed from generation to
generation as long as the "ruling

and other Panther leaders have
jail in recent months.
the Oakland leadership as well,,
but apparently it isn't now. "We
are special," Hilliard said in
December 1969. "We advocate
the very direct overthrow of the
government by way of force and
violence. By picking up guns and
moving against it . .."
Now, says Elaine Brown, a
deputy minister from Los An-
geles, "The main thing is that
the chairman of our party (Bob-
by Seale) is on trial, "and they
(Cleaver's faction) are attempt-
' ing to push that issue out of the
foreground."
Even before the latest crisis
emerged, a series of raids by law
enforcement agencies across the
Union, Rms 22-24, phone 4-2148: Dr. G.{
Sjoblom, U. of Lund, Sweden, Mar. 21-'
25; Mr. V. Yevdokimenko, Inst. of
Philosophy, Kiev, USSR, Mar, 21-23.
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B.
Tuesday, March 23:
Camp Missaukee, Mi. girls. 1:30 - 5,
waterfront dir. (21) and asst. (18 or
up), spec, in crafts, archery, also cooks
and assts.
Vita Craft Corp., Detroit, 9 - 10 and
1 - 5, excellent summer program, job
withchallengetand wide open oppor-
tunities.
Thursday, March 25:
Classic Crafts, Berrien Springs, Mi.,
10 - 5, applications being accepted for
summer college prog., positions avail,
as company reps., challenging oppor-
tunity for ambitious indiv. who enjoys1
travel; must have car.
Camp Ma-Hi-Ya, Toledo Jewish com-
munity camp in M., 10 - 3, waterfront
dir., cooks, and sr. couns., 18 or over.
Friday, March 26:
Camp Tamarack, Fresh Air Soc., De-
troit, 9. - 5, cabin couns., specialists in
waterfront, arts, crafts, nature camp-
craft, tripping, dramatics, dance, pup-'
petry, unit and asst. unit supvr., case-
worker, nurses, truck-bus driver, cooks
assts.
PLACEMENT SERVICES
INTERVIEW SCHEDULE
Appointments can be made for the

spent large amounts of time in
country had kept the Panthers
off-balance.
All their key leaders have spent
time in jail-an Associated Press
study in 1970 showed that more
than 230 party members had
been arrested in the previous 12
months on charges ranging from
jaywalking to murder.
Visitors a year ago to the two-
story brownstone that the Pan-
thers occupied in Berkeley,
Calif., found no men-only wom-
en-busy at the filing cabinets
and electric typewriters and
duplicating machines.
"That's because the men are in
jails," said Hilliard. "In jails or
graveyards . . . right now there
following schools startrng Mon., March
22, 8 a.m., call 764-7459 or stop in.
MARCH 29, Ypsilanti, Mi.
M.RCH 30, Ypsilanti, Mi., Southgate,
Mi., Racine, Wis. (Prairie View Schs.).
MARCH 31, Lorain, Ohio, Mason, Mi.,'
Mt. Vernon, Ohio, Rochester, N.Y.
(Grece Central Sch. District), Garden
City, Mi., Romulus, Mi.
APRIL 1, Davison, Mi., Battle Creek
(Lakeview Schs.), St. James, . N.Y.
(Smithtown Central Sch. Dist.); APRIL
2, Hillsdale, Mi., St. Clair Shores, Mi.,
Taylor, Mi., New Boston, Mi., Virgin
Islands (Charlotte Amalie, St. Thom-
as)
WATERBEDS
$39.95 Twins, Doubles
$44.95 Queens, Kings
with 10 year guarantee at
'ALBATROSS
524 E. William at Maynard
MON.-THURS. 10-6
FRI. 10-8:30 SAT. 10-7

circle" of the United States re-
mains powerful.
Those close to the party say
it is too early to say whether the
Panthers can weather the cur-
rent crisis.
Dr. Charles Hamilton, a black
Columbia University political
science professor who speaks fre-
quently on college campuses,
said the Panthers are no longer
the hot topics of conversation
among black students that they
were a year ago.
Much of the interest this year,
he said, has switched to Pan
Africanism - the feeling that
black people, wherever they are,
need to bunch together and look
toward Africa as the "mother
country." Carmichael was em-
phasizing this when he broke with
the Panthers.
However, a Louis Harris Poll
last year found that 64 per cent
of the blacks questioned said the
Panthers had given them "a
sense of pride," and 80 per cent
said the shootings of the Pan-
thers made them feel that
"blacks have to stand together."
For the student body:
FLARES,
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
* Tads
SSebring
a CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty.

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HE'S ALSO EXPERT IN OTHER
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and SHADES

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