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March 20, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 20, 1,971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Saturday, March 20, 1971

Protester!-
beaten for
pmphlets
By JONATHAN MILLER
Donald Wirtanen, '72, was
beaten up after distributing
leaflets at Hill Tuesday night
protesting featured s p e a k e r
of Black Liberation W e e k,
Immamu Amiri Baraka (Le-
roi Jones.)
Wirtanen was distributing a leaf-
let, published by International
Socialists, critical of Baraka's al-
leged role in breaking the Newark
teachers' strike, outside the audi-
torium with two friends.
Wirtanen says twomen c a m e
out of Hill and told him and his
friends to stop distributing t h e
leaflet.
They confiscated leaflets held'
by Alan Kristal, Wirtanen says.
"We continued to hand out leaf-
lets until 8:30 or 8:45 when the
number of people going into Hill
decreased and we decided to go
over to the classiifed research de-
bate at Rackham.
"I went to get 'ycle when
the two guys cam r and beat
me up, the next thing I re-
member I was in Health Service,"
Wirtanen says.
Wirtanen was driven, to Health
Service by an engineer for a local
company who says he witnessed
the beating. He has asked that his
name not be disclosed.
The witness says, "I saw a gen-
tleman riding a bicycle north on
North University. As he passed
Hill Auditorium two Negro males
ran alongside the bicycle, the tall-
erand heavier ofkthe two on the
street side knocked the man and
his bicycle to the ground. T h e
victim offered no resistance but
the same Negro male kicked him
in the face very hard. It (the
kick) was aimd and delivered as
hard as he could make it."
"By that time I had stopped my
car and parked. By the time I got
out of the car, they both ran into
Hill," the witness adds.
However, Wirtanen says he does
not intend to sign a complaint at
this time and the witness is pre-
pared to testify, awaiting action
by Wirtanen.
FC N-FM
approved
(Continued from Page 1)
rest with the University Broad-
casting Committee, appointed by
the Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs, according to
WCBN-FM executive committee
member Robert Grimshaw, '71.
WCBN, a commercially financed
student run AM station, present-
ly broadcasts "closed circuit" to
the University dormitory buildings
and certain apartments. However,
it cannot be picked upmore than
a few feet away from these spe-
cially "wired" buildings. WCBN-
FM could broadcast, in the usual
manner, to the Ann Arbor area.
If the license application, which
will be sent to Washington next
week, is successful WCBN-FM will
begin broadcasting operations by
January 1972, station officials es-
timate.

COUNCIL RACE:
Three candidates vie
for 2nd ward seat

(Continued from Page 1)
ing the election of police yields
police leaders like Sheriff Doug-
las Harvey. He says, however, he
hopes to improve police proced-
ures and training to enhance po-
lice work and local attitudes
about the police.
De Grieck, on the other hand,
advocates community control of
police, saying "I consider the
police in much the same way as
I view the military: you must
have civilian control." He re-
commends election of this civil-
ian control on the local precinct
level, and says "We are willing
to take a chance on such an
election."
Although Robinson is concern-
Regents meet
on housing,
(Continued from Page 1)
Fleming said that if assurances
were not provided that the Uni-
versity would remain free of any
support for the project, he would
oppose it.
"We simply cannot take addi-
tional obligations when we're des-
perately trying to balance our
budget," he said.
Supporters of the project term-
ed this objection "phony" in view
of the increased costs for bus
service as a result of the comple-
tion of the new Northwood V
housing on North Campus.
Committee member David Chris-
teller said "if we solve the trans-
portation thing with Fleming,
everything will be settled."

ed about the crime rate in Ann
Arbor, he has not formulated
specific proposals to curb it nor
does he have any position about
the general area of police-com-
munity relations. However, he
has said he would recommend
cooperation among various lev-
els of government such as city,
county and state on many is-
sues including police-work.
" The question of student
voting rights in Ann Arbor:
De Grieck and RIP have
suggested that the city clerk
(who registers voters) is a tool
of the Democrats who are try-
ing to discourage student regis-
tration. On the contrary,"
says Faber, "the clerk exercises
a certain amount of leeway but
he cannot vary a great deal
from the letter of the law."
However, De Grieck says it is
the very law, which dictates that
a person shall neither gain nor
lose residency by virtue of his
being a student, that is part of
the problem. "The city charter
should be changed so that the
qualifications for voting in city
elections will be the same as
federal rather than state stand-
ards. This would allow 18-year-
olds to vote."
Furthermore, says De Grieck,
"the City Clerk under existing
law is given much discretion. If
he wished, the Mayor could thus
appoint a clerk who would re-
gister most students, as is the
case in Detroit."
Robinson says simply, "I do
not support all students voting
in their college town" because a
student's primary ties and re-
sponsibilities may be with ano-
ther community.

Rowry hits
fraud eharg
(Continued from Page 1)
on the Ann Arbor News charges
next week.
Albert Wheeler, a member of the
board, replied that "Council is
asking you to comment on a news-
paper story, and if they want to
know more about it they should go
to the newspaper."
Wheeler then charged that Coun-
cil was only "aggravating the situ-
ation" and that he would circulate
a statement in a few days in sup-
port of Rowry and his actions as
Model Cities Policy Board Chair-
man.
The Model Cities Program, de-
signed to improve deteriorating
neighborhoods, has been thrown
into internal turmoil lately with
the firing of a number cf staff
members, and persons have also
expressed concern that the pro-
gram is moving too slowly, with
little of over $1 million in funds
spent in the last two years. The
accusations against Rowry have
further increased the tension with-
in the program.
Rowry claims that "the Univer-
sity of Michigan has retracted most
of the accusations" made in the
Ann Arbor News story.
The University, however, has
made no public statement on the
issues raised by the News story.

Conductron talks to end
(Continued from Page 1) coordinates much of the Univer-
Conductron Corp., a division of Mc- sity's scientific research.
Donnell Douglas Corp., moved to The transfer, if completed, would
St. Louis. 150,000 feet of building have brought the laboratories do-
floor space is included on the prop- ing practically all of the Univer-
erty. sity's $5.6 million in classified re-
Besides the Willow Run Labora- search to a single location closer
tories with its 367 employes, Uni- to campus.
versity officials had reportedly con- iuPedpnt said in January the
sidered transferring elements of buildings at Conductron were much
the electrical engineering depart- better than the facilities at Willow
ment including the Radiation Lab- Run, and as a result, highly desir-
oratory and Cooley Electronics Lab able from the university's view-
to the site, as well as the Institute point. The land and buildings are
for Science and Technology, which valued at $2-3 million.

SHALOM HOUSE presents
THE AWARD-WINNING FILM
"THE FIXER"*
ON: SUNDAY, MARCH 21, 7 & 9 P.M.

AT: 1429 H ILL ST.

25c

,'
t

'HONORING UJA WEEK, MARCH 18-23

I____
w

3
i
t

Trial goes on
(Continued fromPage 1)
tained to the conspiracy charges.
The judge, however, denied Gar-
ry's request that the jury be in-
structed on the basis of that ruling
to disregard hearsay testimony in
regard to the murder and kidnap-
ing.
Mulvey said he would do this "at
the proper time," possibly mean-
ing his final instructions to the
jury at the conclusion of the trial.
The jury was dismissed for the
day as Roraback and Garry filed
separate written motions on be-
half of their clients to force Sams
to undergo a psychiatric examina-
tion before he testifies.

Conductron was founded in 1960
by former University electrical en-
gineering Prof. Keeve Siegel. It
was one of the most successful
''spinoff" corporations ever formed
by University faculty members.
Since University research labora-
tories are not in the production
business, the opportunity arises for
professors to profit from their re-
search by setting up private cor-
porations.

Learn Russian in Ill-B
The Department of Slavic Languages may offer
intensive first-year Russian during -"the summer
half-term (June 30 to August 19th) if there is
sufficient interest. Classes will meet 10-12, 1-3
five days a week. Eight hours credit. Material cov-
ered is equivalent to Russian 101 and 102. Call the
department (764-5355) and provide name and
phone before March 30 if interested.
4
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Liberty Inn Lounge
PIANO BAR
112 W. Liberty-Ann Arbor
FEATURING THE INCREDIBLE
Dave Alexander
Blues Pianist

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For the student body:
FLARES
by
A Levi
Farah
* Wright
Tads
SSebring
CHIECKMATE

Creath
r
i^Student
and MASS
SUNS
Eastt
......:vx r.,"ix;..r::x :.K .'?5k:;{::4V"::''

a;..

ve Arts Festival

presents

Poetry Reading
MEDIA DEMONSTRATION

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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Day Calendar
Afro-American & African Studies:
"what Are You Doing The Rest of
Your Life?" symposium, M. Hadden,
moderator, "What's It All About Alfie?
or Brothers and Sisters," Aud. A, Angell
Hall, 9:30 a.m.
Education Lecture: M. Esch, congress-
man, "Educational Implications of
Comprehensive Manpower Proposals:
Implications on Federal Level," Assem-
bly Hall, Rackham, 9:30 a.m.
Prof. Theatre Prog.: "Siamese Con-
nections," Mendelssohn Theatre, 2:30
p.m.
International Students Assoc.: Japan-
ese Night, Rive Gauche, 8 p.m.
School of Music:uContemporary Di-
rections, Electronic Music and Mixed
Media, Rackham Lect. Hail, 8 p.m.
University Players: "The Refusal,"
Trueblood, 8 p.m.
Black Liberation Week: National
Black Theatre of Harlem, "Regain our
Strength & Reclaim our Power," plus
Diane Vlorgus, Mi. Union Ballroom,
8 p.m.
Men's Glee Club: Spring Concert, Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: Vietnam photo
display, UGLI main lobby (through
April 1).
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B.
Tuesday, March 23
Camp Missaukee, Mi. girls, 1:30 - 5;
waterfront dir. (21) and asst. (18 or
up), spec. in crafts, archery, a 1 s o
cooks and assts.

Vita Craft Corp., Detroit, 9 - 10 and
1 - 5, excellent summer program, job
with challenge and wide open oppor-
tunities.
Thursday, March 25
Classic Crafts, Berrien Springs, Mi.
10 - 5, applications being accepted for
summer college prog.; positions avail. as
company reps.; opportunity for ambi-
tious indiv. who enjoys travel, m u s t
have car.
Camp Ma-Hi-Ya, Toledo Jewish com-
munity camp located in Mi. 10 - 3, wat-
erfront dir., cooks, and couns. 18 or
over.
Friday, March 26
Camp Tamarack, Fresh Air Soc., De-
troit, 9 - 5, cabin couns., specialists
in waterfront, arts, crafts, nature
campcraft, tripping, dramatics, dance,
puppetry, unit and asst. unit supvr.,
caseworker, nurses, truck-bus driver,
cooks assts.

State Street at Liberty

DAY, MARCH 21
Quad, Room 126
2:00 P.M.

FRI. AND SAT. NIGHTS

Join
The Daily

I

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. HURON
10:30 a.m.-"Who's Running Me, Jesus?"
REV. PAUL SWETS
6:30 p.m.-"Vocational Styles"-Panel
TIME TO MOVE?

Summer and Fall Leases now available at
UNIVERITY . AIR CONDITIONING
UNIVERSIGY
- SWIMMING POOL

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