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March 20, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-20

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 20, 1977 i ,

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 20, 1971

':" . t

Advent-Now Only
$219.00
(was $260.00)

It's a
By RANDY PHILLIPS
"It was really far out." That
w a s Ramone Almonte's reac-
tion to being named captain of
the 1971 tennis squad. But his
response was not due primarily
to a feeling of honor or person-
al pride; it was more a result of
an underlying feeling of respect
for the general attitude of peo-
ple at Michigan towards athlet-
ics.
It may be somewhat of an
over-used idea, but Almonte be-
lieves that you "don't have to be
mister jock" to make it in ath-
letics anymore.
Tennis has generally been able
to avoid the stereotype of the
jock image in the past, however
the senior from San Juan sees
a change in even th e major
sports. In his own sport, Almon-
te notes a significant change.
Players would generally asso-
ciate together socially off the
courts, but according to Aimon-
te, "It used to be like that when
I was freshman, but not any
more."
When asked what he believes
has caused this change, Almon-
te hypothesized that the general
attitude of the student body to-
wards athletics has been a ma-
jor influence. B u t he added,
"There is much more space for
the individual to create and to
worry about his own individual
facet of the sport, and in the
long run this puts the team to-
gether."
If one tried to conjure up an
image of the typical big uni-
versity athletic team captain, he
surely would not come up with

gone man trip

Tape Transport: Electronics speed regulation.
Automatic shut-off at end of tape.
Tape Speed: 1.875 i.p.s. plus -1%
Wow and Flutter: Less than 0.15%1/, DIN weighted.

anything t h a t resembled Ra-
mone Almonte. Most likely such
an image would be in part due
to prejudices built up by some
of us over the years, but the
Michigan netter supplies us
with more than our prejudices
can account for. Almonte is in-
termittently flamboyant a n d
aloof, and he often gives one
the initial impression that he
cares little about anything he is
doing. However, as one talks to
this flashy Puerto Rican, an
outspoken c o n c e r n emerges
rather bluntly.
Almonte is definitely not gung
ho with spirit, at least not with
school spirit. He remarked, "I've
got spirit as far as going out and
winning, and that's what it is
all about."
His bluntness surfaces when
he discusses his peeves with the
Michigan tennis program. "I
should have gone to Australia or
maybe California if I wanted to
be number one." When ques-
tioned whether he meant num-
ber one as a team or as an in-
dividual, Almonte responded,
"Tennis is a one man trip. You
can make it a team thing (with
spirit) ."
Almonte is particularly upset
with the facilities and competi-
tion at Michigan. "There's little
incentive as far as playing Big
Ten schools. Those sports with
good facilities and funding are
growing." Michigan has domi-
nated the Big T e n in recent
years nearly as much as Indi-
ana has in swimming with three
straight conference crowns, and

12 championships in the last 16
years.
Apparently, Almonte doesn't
think the athletic department is
giving as much attention to ten-
nis as the sport deserves. He
contrasts Michigan's program
with the one at UCLA. "UCLA
is a great power in all athletic
areas."
But the problems are more
immediately seen if one takes
the time to watch a practice on
any weekday between 1 and 3
p.m.
The Wolverine netmen play
on the intramural building bas-
ketball courts which are super-
fast. The nets h a v e holes in
them which makes it difficult to
distinguish between a fault and
a let ball, and the ceiling gird-
ers and baskets often pick off
lobs in mid-air.
Almonte proposed three steps
that he would like to see taken
which would alleviate both of
the above mentioned problems.
-"We (the tennis team) have
to move to the club (Huron Val-
ley Tennis Club) on Plymout
Rd."
-"We have to get the courts
at the Plymouth Club atbette
times."
-"Team members have to be
given some kind of outside com-
petition like sending the bestin-
dividuals to national events."
Almonte expects things tc
change and believes Wolverine
Coach Brian Eisner will play ar
instrumental r o 1 e in these
changes. The Michigan captair
feels that Eisner has been work-
ing well under the restriction
of the university's athletic de-
partment (funds and facilities)
and the conference (stricter
regulations than any other con-
ference). But Almonte says
"He's (Eisner) going to do it
and surprise a lot of people."
The number four singles play-
er has high respect for Eisner.
Eisner has given spine of the
team members hassles with their
hair, but according to Almonte,

or net star Almonte
"He's getting it together, now."
He added, "It was good when "b'
Eisner came in; (former) Coach
Brian Murphy was a good in.
structor, but not a good coach.
Eisner's a great coach, has a lot
of creativity, and is really dy-}
namic."
Almonte was eight years old
when he first took up the rack-
et. "I was just hanging around
the club (Caribbean Hilton Ten-
nis Club), and started playing.
My instructor (Welby V a n
Horn) was out of sight." Van
Horn began training Almonte
early and by the age of nine he
was already entering Ramone
in tournaments.
The flashy ground stroker has
won several Junior Orange Bowl
doubles titles and once, at the
age of 16, advanced to the semi-
finals of the Orange Bowl sing-
les competition. This Miami
tourney is generally considered
the most competitive one of the
year.
° Since he's been at Michigan,
Almonte hasn't participated in :{y-:..
many non-school tennis events.".:,.$.::.?:.}:::{::r:
But says, "As far as Big Ten nd
tennis, I've done well." Almonte'':--"..-:A:o}:..:.,-:{s :;'s
9 was the conference runner-up :.i}'.~p.".i:$j': ::::::-::$:>-+$
at number five singles last sea- -::
son.
Almonto is taking a BGS de . p_.."'' "
gree program , and has develop- ;:-..:.:::::<.>,::.}:}};.........:.:.. .... .. - '; .;.
ed an interest in psychology. He "*.'s
plans to attend either Law. : :s:.... :<- ~::,}: .}: :-. .:
a School or graduate :school in <:; :,;; } ;.} :,
busintess.takeda whethre wll and_____
thnntigBn o. a oeA m necntm ltshs g m

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gEe WINDSOR TODAY
'IRuggers chase Big 10 title

New From Levi !

HI-F HEADQUARTERS
In Ann Arbor for 23 Years

For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans

By CHUCK DRUKIS
"We have an excellent chance
to win the Big Ten." Jacques Pas-
sino said confidently.
Passino is the president of Mich-
igan's rugby club this spring. The
season was launched last Satur-
day, putting the ruggers in the
right orbit as both the blue and
gold squads overwhelmingly rock-
ed Cleveland.
Hindered by inclement weather,
the blue team performed raggedly
the first half despite a 5-0 lead,
however, the first half "practice
session" served as just a tune-up
for the ruggers as they rolled on
to a 14-0 victory.
Cleveland, a traditionally out-
standing team, had been expected
to be Michigan's roughest compe-
tition of the season. Overall, the
team was "very satisfied" with the
win.
Physically, the players are in
better shape than last fall. Quin-
ton Lawson, a remarkable ath-
lete who broke his arm early in

308 S. State

665-8607

liFe music center, Inc.

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the fall season, is ready to go.
Moreover, the Cleveland game re-
sulted in no serious injuries.
Most of the members of t h e
squad that rolled up an 8-3 re-
cord last fall have returned. The
scrum will be much stronger, thus
allowing the team better control
of the ball offensively.
Tom Webster, absent last fall,
but having several seasons' exper-
ience, will be playing this springt.
Many of the players are grad stu-
dents also having several seasons'
experience. One of them is Terry
Larrimer.
Larrimer has played for f i v e
years and is this year's captain.
Admidst the joking and the snow-
balls, he runs an organized prac-
tice. His experience and leader-
ship are a great asset to the team.
The ruggers are a cohesive unit.
"In rugby you have to play hard,
needing as much intestinal forti-
tude, stamina, and ability as any
sport," said Larrimer. "There is a
healthy, competitive a t t i t u d e
throughout the game, between
team members and opponents.
There are no set plays or patterns,
but each player has a sense of the
open field. We play for fun."
Rugby, not being a varsity
sport, is a club sport, bound by a
lot of tradition. "Traditionally

there are three halves," said Pas-
sino, "two on the field and one
off. After the game, the host team
throws a party. All the players-
are united in beer and song."
Unlike many other sports, rug-
by is not played professionally in
North America. Most teams are
college teams or city clubs such
as Cleveland. The players enjoy v
the game, but are also represent-
ing their schools.
The spring season is a short one
for the ruggers, scheduled for four
games and t h e n the Big Ten
tournament. The ruggers travel to
Windsor today. Windsor plays a
very intelligent game, being up on
the rules and technicalities.
The only home game this spring
will be next Saturday against Uni-
versity of Detroit. The following
week they play in Chicago.
The Big Ten tournament is in
Columbus, Ohio, April 11-12. Ohio
State, Purdue, and Wisconsin willM
participate, w it h Wisconsin ex-
pected to be the hardest to han-
dle. Confidence, a major attribute
of the team, could be the major
factor that brings the champion-
ship to Michigan.
Usually with numerous foreign
students skilled in the finer points.*
of the game, Chicago nevertheless
lost to Michigan last fall 18-13.

$1.50

11 Ili

I

PRE-SH RUN K

FOUR LECTURES ON

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

C( s_:::LE .**: _______"

,'"

GEiT YOUR MANWITRHA
Want A

The
East

Futur
and

of

Religion:.

I

I

West

4

WORSHIP,

TUESDAY-MARCH 23 at 7:30 p.m.
"Psychedelic Drugs and the Future of Religion"
Professor Walter H. Clark
THURSDAY-MARCH 25 at 4:00 p.m.
"A Sociological Look at the Future of Religion"
Professor Anton D. Zijderveld
TUESDAY---MARCH 30 at 7:30 p.m.
"The Future of Japanese Religions"
Professor Joseph M. Kitagawa

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Matins.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
1 :00 p.m.-Free-form Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
Wednesday, 7:15 p.m.-Lenten Worship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.

FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND'
FOUNDATION

METHODIST
WESLEY

State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m.-Family Worship Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover Rupert:
"Be Faithful."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 a.m. to noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
7:00 p.m.-Program-Dow Chemical repre-
Sunday, March 21:
5:30 p.m.-Celebration.
6:15 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-Program-Dow Chemical repre-
sentative discussing industry and pollution
Friday, March 26:.
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, PineRoom.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Preaching:
Mr. Sanders.

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St.
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11 :00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held
at YM-YWCA, 350 South Fifth Ave.-Ron
Johnson.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study and Prover Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prayer
and Counseling, also, 19 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
Daily Word, published at Unity Village, is
available.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, "More or less
lurching bodily toward Bethlehem, or per-
haps Calvary."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheins, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Supper at 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Vesper Service at 1 0:00 p.m.

Its

i

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I

THURSDAY-APRIL 1

at 7:30 p.m.

"A Hindu Perspective on the Future of Religion"
Professor Shivaraman
The Multi-purpose Room
SECOND FLOOR IN THE UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Camus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.

I

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister

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