100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 12, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


page three

ZtiI P

BiitCt

34 A 4tin

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, January 12, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page TI

"AS DAZZLING A CALVACADE AS HAS
EVER BEEN PUT ON A SCREEN!"
-Newsweek Magazine

SHOWS AT
1 :00
3:30
6:05
8:40 .

0brat

------ ----

t1AAidNURA

37N MAPLE RD
MON.-FRI. 7:05-9:15
StPisanis d
Panavision Color

SAT. SUN.
2:00-3:45-6:30
a :159:1

r0

nws briefs
By The Associated Press
THE UNITED AUTO WORKERS has set a strike deadline of
10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19 at Chrysler Corp.
UAW President Leonard Woodcock said yesterday the union's
120,000 members at Chrysler would strike then if agreement is not
reached on a new contract.
PAUL MEADLO, a former soldier under the command of, Lt.
William Calley, testified yesterday he helped Calley kill Vietna-
mese civilians with automatic rifle fire.
Meadlo, testifying under a grant of immunity, said, "Calley or-
dered me to help him kill the people, so I started shooting them too."
THE SUPREME COURT agreed to hear boxer Muhammad
Ali's appeal on his draft conviction yesterday and refused the
case of James Hoffa, Jailed president of the Teamsters Union.
All's decision meant he will have his chance to fight Joe Fraz-
ier for the heavyweight title this March in what is expected to be the
richest title bout in ring history.
For Hoffa, the court's action means he will continue to serve a
remaining five year prison term and will be unable to keep his office
unless his parole board gives his leave.
* * *
U.S. DEFENSE SECRETARY Melvin Laird said yesterday he
"will meet or beat" his announced withdrawal target in the gov-
ernment's program to reduce U.S. troop strength in South Viet-
nam.
Laird said it would amount to "additional thousands" of troops
withdrawn this year.
PRESIDENT ANWAR SADAT told a massive rally of cheer-
ing Egyptians yesterday that Israel will be punished for "her ag-
gression," but insisted Cairo seeks peace.
While attacking the United States for allegedly urging the Egyp-
tians to "concede to Israeli demands," Sadat said his nation was!
"eager to reach peace but we will accept no compromise:"
THE UNITED STATES delivered a stern oral protest to the
Soviet Union yesterday against the harassment of Americans in
Moscow.
According to a .U.S. Embassy spokesman, the Soviet Foreign Min-
istry replied that Americans would not be suffering such harassment
if Soviet citizens would be left in peace in the United States.
The harassment has been' in retaliation for activities of Jewish
militants against Soviet diplomats and performing artists in the U.S.
* * *
THE DEFENSE DEPARTMENT'S draft call for February
will be 17,000 men, the same number called in January, a Depart-
ment spokesman said yesterday.
The Pentagon will continue inducting men into the service but
their numbers are expected to decline gradually as the administra-
tion's termination date of July 1, 1973 for draft calls approaches.
* * *
BETHLEHEM STEEL CO., the nation's No. 2 producer,
started a new round of price increases yesterday that may possi-
bly be passed on to the consumer.
The, new boosts in heavy construction steel products comprise
about 15 per cent of the entire industry's shipments. Bethlehem de- I
clined to say how much it alone produces.
F ______ ___--___ ____

THE BEATLES.
"Ag N9din
RE-RELEASED THR6 UNIEARST

-Associated Press
B~olivian revolt
Bolivia's military patrols the streets of La Paz, the nation's
capital, yesterday after an attempted coup by a right wing army
clique. President Juan Jose Torres termed the situation, "under
control.
COMMON CAUSE:
Group fights phony
car aitgn poicies

Nixon signs. cul
in business tax
SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (A- - President Nixon, see
to create jobs and promote economic growth, annoui
yesterday complex rule changes reducing the short-I
tax load on business but designed to cause no long-term
loss.
The move will cut $2.6 billion from tax collections
year and the reductions will reach a peak of about
billion in 1976, the President said. This will have the effec
channeling billions into the sagging economy.
The new formula will provide a faster tax write-of:
funds plowed into new plants and equipment purchases.

TUESDAY
Let It Be-6:30
Yellow Sub-8:00
Hard Day's
Night-9 30
Help--1 :00
WEDNESDAY,
Yellow
Submarine-6:30
Let It Be-8:00
Sneak Preview-9:30
Hard Day's'
Night-I 1:00

WASHINGTON (P) - Calling
campaign spending a national
scandal, John W. Gardner, head
of a public interest lobby,
brought s u i t in federal court
yesterday to bar the use of dum-
my fund-raising committees.
Gardner's class action suit
named the Republican and Dem-
ocratic national committees and
the Conservative party as de-
fendants but he said:
"This is not an attack on the
political party system or on any
individual party official or con-
tributor. It is an attack on un-
limited campaign spending."
The newly organized Com-
mon Cause, which Gardner
heads, charged that political
parties established a "multi-.
plicity of dummy national com-
mittees" to encourage individual
contributions to a single candi-
date in excess of the $5,000 limit
allowed.
The election law states that
no one person may contribute
more than $5,000
Gardner maintained also that
political committees violate the

rule that they cannot receive or
spend more than $3 million per
year.
The complaint said political
committees arranged for banks
and others to make loans of ov-
er $5,000 to contributors with
the knowledge that the funds
would be given to a single can-
didate or political committee.
In the past campaign for ex-
ample, the National Republican
Senatorial. Committee g a v e
roughly $5,000 each to such
groups as "D.C. Committee for
Effective Legislation" "Commit-
tee to Further Educational Op-
portunities," and "Citizens for
Good Government Committee."i
All were conduits to channel
GOP money into the campaign
of Sen. Winston L. Prouty (R-
Vt.).
In Indiana, GOP Senate can-
didate Richard Roudebush had
40 separate committees. Form-
er White House political aide
and fund-raiser Jack A. Glea-
son was the sole donor to 38 of
them.

In effect, what the administra-
tion is doing in its campaig'n to
spur production, employment and
the sagging economy is to defer
taxes for businessmen.
The economic thinking behind
the move was challenged, how-
ever, by two Democratic senators
who issued statements in W a sh-
ington criticizing the President's
action.
Sen. Birch Bayh of Indiana said
he can't see how "a minor adjust-
ment" in depreciation allowances
will encourage any increased in-
vestment in plantĀ° and equipment,
and Sen. George McGovern of
South Dakota' contended that ac-,
celerating depreciation allowances
is "among the least effective ways"
of stimulating the economy.
Under the guidelines laid down
Monday, one key change will per-
mit a 20 per cent speedup in
claiming tax write-offs.
"Past experience," the President
said in a statement, "demonstrates
that depreciation liberalization
will stimulate the pace of spending
on new plant and equipment,
which has been levelling off, and
thus create jobs.
"As a result, federal tax col-
lection in the long run will in-
crease."
Nixon said, too, that: "A liber-
alization of depreciation allow-
ances is essentially a change in the
timing of a tax liability. The pol-
icy permits business firms to re-
duce tax payments now, when ad-
ditional purchasing power is
needed, and to make up these pay-
ments: in later years.
"Clearly, therefore, these steps
toward meaningful depreciation
reform are important for the pre-
sent-in light of current economic
conditions-and for the future-to
maintain the growth which h a s
made this nation the strongest
and most productive the world
has ever known."
Another benefit Nixon foresaw is
an increase in the competitive
position of American exports, and
strengthening the balance of in-
ternational payments.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $10 by mai,
bummer Session published Tuesday
through' Saturday morning. Subscrip-
Ion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail

Teachers. hi-
Is
govt. Pr1iicy
WASHINGTON (AP)-Spc
men for the National Educs
Association strongly implied
.terday that the nation's two
lion school teachers will be ra
against the Nixon administral
in 1972 unless the President me
positively to help public educat
At a news conference calle
announce that the federal gov
ment's percentage contributior
the support of public schools
fallen to its lowest level;, in
years, NEA president Helen E
said:
"The nation's teachers will
whatever action is necessary
make education a top priorit
our public schools."
Mrs. Bain said that a post
step would be the creation o
separate department of educa
Although the federal gov
ment will spend a record $2.9
lion on public schools in 197(
an increase of $126 million
the previous year, is will rer
sent only 6.9 per cent of the 4
billion it will take to run
schools.
The high point of federal
came in 1967-68 when federal
sistance represented 8 per en
the school dollar, according
NEA's 29th annual report of '
timates of School Statistics."
In 1964-65 the percentage
federal aid was estimated by
NEA at 3.8 per cent. The n
school year it jumped to 7.9
cent and reached its peak of 8
cent in 1967,68.
Failure of the federal govi
ment to put up more money,
NEA report said, means 1
states will have to pay $17.21
lion and localvgovernments $
billion.
In addition, an estimated $
million will be needed for rep
ment of bonded debt.
Mrs. Bain said "resistance to
creased taxes at the state and
cal level has resulted in e
school closings due to lack
funds, record school levy defe
bankrupt schools, cutbacks in e
cational programs and' a sloe

o PP? IFUNHFu m ?UBT
Dawr4Tow"' ANN ARBOR
NPORMATION 761-0700

Starts Thursday - "KAMA SUTRA"

I

DE RB

CAMPUS,

will meet with University of Michigan L.S.&A. stu-
dents who are planning their junior-senior concentra-
tions

DATE: Thurs., Jan. 14

TIME: 4:00-6:00 p.m.

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
CLIVE DONNER'S
THE CARETAKER
FROM THE PLAY BY
HAROLD PINTER
Tuesday, Jan. 12 Wednesday, Jan. 13
Alice's Restaurant Canterbury House
Alice Lloyd Hall 330 Maynard
7-9-11 P.M.-ADMISSION 75c
MAGIC HOUSE FAMILY
LAST CHANCE TONIGHT!

DIAL 8-6416
ENDING WEDNESDAY
"'BORSALINO' SCORES!
--Pla yboy Magazine
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
BEST FILMSI -Te Catho ic

PLACE: 2235 Angell Hall
UM-DEARBORN PROGRAMS AVAILABLE:
1. Business Administration
2. Liberal Arts-including elementary and secondary teaching

I

doni cho ostuto

FOLLETTS
Textbook Dept. is
updated to
Today's way Frith
Mechanical
Access Card
Selectors.
Come in and
See it Work.
Rush Oarders for
Course Books
are ,TELEXED

I

11

I

- 3

I

I

"Gangland French style!
They kill a little, love o
little, fight a little!"
-N.Y. TIMES
* THURSDAY *
"HAGBARD & SIGNE"
(The Red Mantle)

VIVIAN
tAIN

I

A(HA L
K 1MOYAN
RS
RQooxs
,JOSEPH STUN
WHOWRT
"FIDDLER on the ROOF"
MC Syi JOHN KANOER
...__RFDFRR

~6

(The edMn.le

Travel the Cosmos with

1
'
_ .
, ...

the iris bell adventure

wed. at 8 p.m. in

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan