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March 18, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-18

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Thursday, March 18,1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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- --

PRIMARY LOSER

SEEKS REELECTION:
Harris criticized b left right

"""""'"rr

Ernst asks write-ins

By TOM WIEDER
Lewis Ernst is running an in-
dependent write-in campaign for#
mayor after his defeat in the Re-}
publican primary by Jack Garris.
Althiough he received only aboutr
300 votes then, he.says he is run-
ning because, "I want to be may- >.
or."
Ernst sets lower taxes at the
top of his list of campaign pro-
posals. He feels city officials are
overpaid, the police force should
be cut, the mayor should per-
sonally handle the work of the Human Rela-
tions Department and Ozone House should be
eliminated.
"It brings more people I don't want to come
to Ann Arbor and doesn't do the job it's claim-
ing," he says of the drug rehabilitation center.,
Vehemently opposed to U.S. involvement in
Southeast Asia, Ernst believes the mayor can

help end the war by lending his
support and influence to local
:s peace groups. He. claims that
neither Mayor Robert Harris nor
Garris are wholeheartedly against
the war.
Although he wants to cut the
police force to save tax dollars,
he feels it should be more effec-
tive in controlling crime.
"What I really want to do is cut
the crime rate in Ann Arbor so
it's not much more than Dear-
born," Ernst says. He claims this
can be done by improving the force's efficiency.
Ernst has mixed feelings about student par-
ticipation in Ann Arbor government. He sup-
ports students' right to vote in city elections but
doubts that they are familiar enough with local
issues to make wise decisions.
"Students have got to be more law-abiding,"
Ernst adds.

REPUBLICAN NOMINEE:
Garris blasts permissiveness

(Continued from Page 1)
down the police department
every time it gets a chance."
Much of the criticism stems
from "permissive" police hand-
ling of incidents involving Uni-
versity demonstrations as well
as the generally expanding crime
rate in the city which his oppo-
sition blames on restrictions on
the police.
Harris denies handicapping the
police and cites the fact that the
police allocation is the most rap-
idly increasing area of his budget
as evidence of his concern.
Conservative opposition over
'Harris'stands on the issues of
drugs and pornography has also
been strong.!
Because of his support of an
ordinance to lower the city's
penalties for possession of mari-
juana and his opposition to a
Republican - sponsored ordinance
to restrict allegedly pornographic
material, conservatives h a v e
charged Harris' Democratic ad-
ministration with having a "so-
cial permissivist philosophy".
Harris responds by terming the
Republican's pornographyI ordi-
nance "unconstitutional." He also
defends the marijuana ordinance
as necessary because of exces-
sive marijuana penalties and the
disrespect for law generated by
such "unfair" penalties.
The mayor's efforts in bringing
low cost housing into Ann Arbor
have met with opposition from
conservative landowner'; who ob-
ject to such project:; in their
neighborhoods, as well as Re-
publicans who call for a greater
reliance by the city on the free
market to bring rents down.
Harris says however low cost
housing is necessary because the
free market system does not
work here in providing low cost
housing.
He says the high cost of living
in Ann Arbor which forces local
workers to live outside the city
necessitates increasing the sup-
ply of low cost accommodations
in Ann Arbor.
Another area of conservative
opposition to Harris is in the civil
rights field, especially the model
cities program which seeks im-

(Continued from Page 1)
would hope "to bring about a
better understanding between the
sheriff and local police."
Along with undesireables, Gar-
ris believes drug traffic consti-
tutes, a large part of the crime
problem in Ann Arbor, and he
takes a hard line against loosen-
ing the drug or narcotics laws.
"Politicians are doing a dis-
service to youth by playing with
the liberalization of drug laws
in their attempt to draw youth
support," he says.
As a long term solution to the
problem, Garris favors an edu-
cational program beginning at
the kindergarten level if neces-
sary, "to bring home to these
young people the harm that they
are doing to themselves."
As a more immediate measure.
Garris favors continuation of the
present misdemeanor penalties
for the first three convictions for
use of marijuana, but with pen-
alties increasing each time.
However, for the fourth convic-
tion, and for sale of marijuana,
Garris would impose felony pmn-
alties.
'The intent (of drug laws is
not to 'punish poor victims 'who
have been led to the use of mari-
juana and other drugs, but to
salvage their lives," he says.
Garris' opposition to marijuana
is based on his belief that it is
definitely a harmful drug and
leads to heroin use. "At every
raid where the police found tni-
juana, they also found heroin and
other hard drugs," he says.
Indeed, it was concern over the
use of drugs and alcoholic bever-
ages at rock concerts in city
parks that propelled Garris into
the Ann Arbor political arena in
the first place.
In the summer of 1969, when
Sunday afternoon rock 'concerts
sponsored by the White Panther
Party and other community
groups were held in carious city
parks on a rotating basis, Garris
emerged as the legal representa-
tive of a group of citizens wish-
ing to stop the concerts.
"As I got further into it,"
Garris says, "I found there was
something really dangerous de-
veloping and we decided to do
4something about it." Thus, the
Concerned Citizens of Ann Ar-
bor, with Garris as chairman.
was formed.
Among other things, Concerned
Citizens collected 7,000 signatures
and sponsored a march in opposi-
tion to the rock concerts, aznd
* organized a campaign to recall
Mayor Harris and six Democra-
tic councilmen when the City '
Council continued to issue the
park permits for the concert,.
"It's not that we're against the
rock concerts for young people,"
Garris says. "but we are against
the type of people who i ere spon-
soring those concerts."
"The White Panthers are real-
ly a dangerous group," lie say.
"They mean to use :ock mus; .-
to entrap young people into their
way of thinking, in their attempt
to destroy society."
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31, 1971

Garris has also consistently op-
posed the Harris administration's
policies in the field of human
rights, being especially critical
of the Human Rights Depart-
ment, the Housing Commission,
the Model Cities program, arid
the city grievance officer.
"This was a city that had made
remarkable progress in civil
rights and had fine human rela-
tions," he says. "Then Mayor
Harris set up a lot of comn;:s-
sions that pit black against white,
rich against poor."
Claiming that the entire Model
Cities program was misplaced,
he' says: "The present model
cities area had no problems, ra-
cial or economic. It was a well
established neighborhood. What
has been done is to shove mcdel
cities down the throats of people
who didn't even want it, and the
people who could have benefited
the most didn't ;et it."
Also very critical of the people

on the Model Cities policy boat d.
Garris says, "the people on the
board are wholly out of touch
with the people in the commun-
ity. I would bring the people
causing dissension on the board
in front of the public and they'd
right themselves."
In addition, Garris believes
the Harris administration has
fostered housing problems in the
city by discouraging further
housing developments.
Believing that non-interference
by the city government is the
best way to resolve 'sousing dif-
ficulties, Garris says: "I believe
in the great system of free enter-
prise. I don't go along with the
radicals' silly claims that we
need socialism or that we should
run the landlords out of town."
He is also opposed to letting
students vote on the grounds that
they are "transient" and could
therefore act "without conscience
or responsibility."

provement of poor neighborhoods
through community control.
His opponents charge Harris
with failing to provide leadership
in the program and allowing it to
fall into ineffectiveness, with dis-
sention between members of the
program's staff.
Harris defends the model cities
program, saying it would be in-
appropriate for him to interfere
in its operations because the
community itself should run the
program.
Harris also faces opposition
from the more radical portions of
the community, both in loss of
support from students who helped
get him elected in 1969 and in
direct opposition of the newly-
formed Radical Independent Par-
ty which is running Doug Cornell
as their candidate for mayor.
Alleged police brutality in con-
nection with various student de-
monstrations and recent police
actions in drug raids in the city
have resulted in widespread sen-
timent among students and radi-
cals for some form of community
control over the police depart-
ment.
He says he favors."profession-
alizing" the force to reduce the
possibility of police overaction in
confrontations with students and
blacks.
Another important radical con-
cern is the question of building
low cost housing fur the city's
poor.
Harris says the city has been
able to build 200 units of feder-
ally subsidized low cost hous-
ing but has been unable to do.,
more due to a restricted budget.
The left, however, is generally
dissatisfied over the mayor's
performance in this area.
Harris has also been charged
with dging too little in the to
alleviate the city's drug problem.
Many students feel the recentj
city marijuana ordinance, en-
forcement of which seems unlike-
ly, is merely an attempt to woo
the student vote.a
Demands have been made for
stronger action on the mayor's
part including non-enforcement
of laws governing the use of#
marijuana and other drugs.
Harris replies that the legaliz-
ation of marijuana by the city
would be unconstitutional, and
says the new marijuana law is
all the city can legally do.
Strong criticism has come from
both student and the local black
community over the mayor's

relations with blacks, with spe-
cial emphasis placed on the re-
cent firing of Robert Hunter, as-
sistant administrator of the city's
human relations department.
Harris responds that the Hunt-
er firing was the decision of
James Slaughter, head of the hu-
man ,relations commission and
it would be inappropriate to in-
terfere in departmental matters.
He also claims great progress
by the city in the civil rights
area, citing increased hiring by
the city in the human relations
and personnel departments as
well as a new ordinance prohibit-
ing discrimination in union ap-
prentice programs.
CATHY
Happy Birthday
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Cornell emphasizes similarity
of major parties' achievements

(Continued from Page 1)
originally joined the party with
no intention of being a candi-
date, he says, "I am not run-
ning as a personality and I am
not running for personal poli-
tical ambitions."
Perhaps RIP's major criticism
is that there are no major dif-
ferences between the Republi-
can and Democratic parties.
"The basic principle is that as
long as you're willing to vote for
the lesser of two evils you will
never get anywhere," says Nis-
sen.
Cornell says the Harris ad-
ministration in particular h a s
ignored or dealt ineffectively
with a wide range of issues. The
radicals advocate community
control of police, legalization of
marijuana, lowering the voting
age to 18 for city elections and
registration of all students who
they claim are discouraged from
registering to vote by the pre-
sent administration.
They also argue for immediate
construction of 5,000 new units
of tenant-controlled low-cost
housing, a heavily graduate in-
come tax along with reduction of
the present property tax, and
free 24-hour city child c a r e
centers.
RIP claims that the Democrat
Party is no better than the Re-
publican in enacting this kind
of program.
Cornell charges that the
Democrats compromise their
politics to appease a wide range
of special interests and argues
that "spreading yourself all over
the place, a little here, a little
there," accomplishes nothing.
Further, Cornell suggests this

attitude gives people political
leaders who "make the p e o p 1 e
happy with the least effect or
change."
Applying his point of view to
the current race, Cornelles a y s
"there are ways I can see that.
although Garris and Harris
have different utterances, their
effect would be the same."
For example, Cornell cites the
city's new marijuana ordinance.
The ordinance, which provides a
city misdemeanor penalty as an
alternative to the current state
felony penalty, is at this time
considered ineffective because
of Republican County Prosecu-
tor William Delhy's refusal to
cooperate with its enforcement.
Cornell says that Harris and
the Democratic-controlled coun-
cil could have more effectively
instructed the city police not to
enforce any marijuana laws at
all.
He claims that, the Ann
Arbor police could now arrest a
great number of young people on
charges of lewd and lascivious
cohabitation, but chooses not to
do so. He says they could simil-
arly choose not to enforce the
marijuana laws.
RIP's campaign has drawn
criticism largely from liberal
Democrats such as Harris who
claim that they favor many of
the Radical programs; but have
not had the political pull or the
financial base to enact such
programs.
While Democrats have called
RIP "well intentioned", t h e y
have also leveled charges of
"irresponsibility" against RIP

for attacks against Democratic
efforts in social legislation and
programs.
In addition to challenging the
other parties on specific issues
and programs, members of RIP
also criticizes Democrats a n d
Republicans for their -party
structure and operation.
RIP claims they are not r u n
democratically and that candi-
dates, once in office, need not
be responsive to the demands of
the people, and of the party
that sponsored them, or to the
platform they espoused.
According to Cornell, R I P
has published and "conducted
open party meetings," for every-
thing, including the party plat-
form, with anyone attending the
meeting considered an RIP
member.

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