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March 17, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-17

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Page.Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdav March 17 '1971

Page Two THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

1 f V-- -0--y, IY1Vf%-II 1 /I 1 l1 1

PORK: Beginning of
something different

By JOE PEHRSON
Three composers from the Ann
Arbor area, Kurt Carpenter, Rus-
sell Peck and Robert Boury, now
under the combinational heading
"Pork", gave a concert at the
Strata Gallery in Detroit.
These composers presented the
second set of three-the other two
┬░sets were performances of the
Contemporary Jazz Quintet, a
group which will perform in this
area as part of Black Liberation
Week, Friday night.
Pork will also perform in this
area, with works of these com-
posers plus visual works and
works .in sound of other artists
centered in the Ann Arbor vicin-
ity.
The concert marked a rather
abrupt transition from the jazz
set, although the "CJQ" play an
advanced type of contemporary
jazz which, at some times, ap-
proaches the subtlety of contem-
porary music.
The first number the group per-
formed was of really fine quality,
and interesting to those whose
orientation is generally centered
about contemporary "erioso"
art. At times the morphology of
this piece would slowly change as
one musician of the group would
place a different type of sonority
in front of the others. It would
then be a time for a conscious-
ness of this change until finally
a change in form on the part of
the entire ensemble takes place.
This slower-paced jazz was en-
joyable listening although I'm
certain others who hold different
esthetics than my own will ap-
preciate the faster music which
undoubtedly will be part of the
performance in this city.
The Performance by Pork was
marked by some really exciting
moments. Kurt Carpenter's new
piano Piece is excellent-a type
of wide spread clusteral work-a
sort of dense ragtime. The per-
formance I heard was remark-
able for its clarity, and Carpen-
ter reaches an intellectual level
which is equal, at times to any
contemporary music I have
heard His piece is unarguable,
although his esthetics may some-
time be in dispute. The title
First Come will give some indi-
cation of this-I believe this is
partially justified by his vitality
-butt at some times an indication
that some of his priorities are in
the 'wrong places. '
A film by Reynold Lowe, an
Ann Arbor based artist, was a
critical appraisal of space, and
one of the best films of this genre
I have seen. The film was a jour-
ney through a room of many in-
teresting polyethylene objects. A
wonderful film, although the
juxtoposition of some of the
sound moments of Carpenter's
"Lone Wolf" was too liberal.
This, and a following film
which accompanied R o b e r t
Boury's "Honk" were part of
"the Ashley"-a theatre piece by
Robert Ashley, a composer af-
filiated with the "Once" group
and who, incidentally, will be in
Ann Arbor next weekend for the
Saturday night concert of "Con-
temporary Directions".
The visual tape is a fine illus-
tration of video tape technique,
but only that. It is highly over-

done and the form of the dancer,
which is a continuous image-
was much too pervasive. This
technique, which permitted
Boury to select from three cam-
era views of a dancer as the
dance was in progress-a visual
editing and creation of a work in
"real' time, might be used to
great advantage, but it would
have to involve a much greater'
syntactical content than this film
presented.
Boury's rags seem much too
literal examples of this form. A
piece entitled "Varsity Rags"
contained three of these which,
while not in my estimation too
interesting, were appreciated by
the jazz-oriented audience. The
intellectual content is not great,
but they are relatively enjoyable
listening.
The performance by the Ann
Arbor Mime Troup had a content
which was, in stylistic terms,
"cute". The activities tend to be
situational, and the performance
in general was inaccurate.
A presentation of a piece by
Terry Kincaid, "Spring Song"
was elaborated by a dance per-
formance by Linda Ellis and by
background slides by Lowe.
Terry's tape is good but relative-
ly static in content, and while
Linda's dance is very good, it
tended to be too similar in this
stylistic way when combined
with the sound. As a still, a single
frame, this combined media pre-
sentation was good (a single
visual situation) but in motion it
took on some expressive conno-
tations of "art" that are not my
preference.
George Cacioppo's "Informed
Sources" was muddled by the in-
troduction of Jazz elements (the
string bass player joined the
performance at the piano by Rus-
sell Peck and Carpenter). It is
good that the composer was not
there to hear it. The freedom
permitted by Cacioppo is not to
be taken as stylistic unconcern.
The visual organization of this
score shows the type of esthetic
which is Cacioppo's interest, and
some liberties were taken with
this which were clearly not part
of this esthetic.C
Carpenter's "Lone Wolf" is a
curious compromise between ele-
ments all of which must be seen
in a serious vein, and a com-
posite which attracts the atten-
tion of persons outside this
orientation. This is the real in-
terest. in this piece, and Carpen-
ter's success in this combination
is amazing. Again, one may not
care for Carpenter's stylistic con-
tent, but it is definitely arguable
and sensible music.
Carpenter, Peck and Boury will
have, it seems to me, a greater
freedom for the esthetic which is
their own when shown separately
from the CJQ. The CJQ is, how-
ever, excellent in its own right.
and those interested in Contem-
porary Jazz should look forward
to their approaching concert.
O--

Hawk
By GAIL LENHOFF VROON
In the good old days, when
film buffs came to blows over
what was to be shown on cam-
pus, Howard Hawks was a topic
of heated discussion. Longtime
popular success obscured h i s
talents. He joined the ranks of_
directors dematerialized by the
peculiar communalism of t h e
Hollywood studio. Serious crit-
ics dismissed his classical, al-
most invisiblenstyle in favor of
the stylization so apparent in
the films of Eisenstein, Von
Sternberg and Bergmann. For
it is the dynamics of perform-
ance and public that attract
Hawks rather than the discrete
units of script and preplanned
mise en scene. He feels at home
in noisy channels.
Cinema Guild's festival pre-
sents a rare opportunity to re-
construct the unique amalgam
of style and motif that consti-
tutes the world of Hawks. For.
all its realism, it is a bizzarre
world. While in the context of
established genres the heroes
appear as familiar types, they
emerge as haunted, even per-
verse figures in the gallery of
Hawks' filmic constellation.
The works in two broad cate-
gories - adverture and com-
edy. This results in a binary op-
position where every hero is
countered by his own inverse
proportion. Humphrey Bogart
in The Big Sleep shows his oth-
er face, then, as Joe Malone,
that unfortunate detective in
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes who
is unceremoniously stripped,
doused with water and s e n t
staggering out the door in a
negligee by the combined talents
of Jane Russell and Marilyn
Monroe.
Only Angels Have Wings il-
lustratesHawks' characteristic
adventure film. A select group
of mail pilots, bound by a need
which they cannot explain, fly
nightly missions over the Andes.
The dominant here is their in-
stinctual fear of what might
be termed metinomization. The
men are defined not so much by
their surroundings, as by their
horror of becoming static ele-
ments 'of those surroundings.
That is, man becomes an object
when he ceases to move toward.

danger . .. when he isn't 'good
enough.'
The Big Sky, set in pre-white
man Missouri, studies the rela-
tionship of two men, Jim Deak-
ins (Kirk Douglas) and Boone.
Boone worships Jim who takes
the place of Boone's brother,

festival at

killed by Indians. This is carried
to the point where Boone, who
hates Indians and is indifferent
to ladies, marries the Indian girl
Teal Eye for whom Jim has ex-
pressed an attraction. A striking-
ly Hawksian touch occurs when
Boone hesitates to 'pay' for the

guild'
girl with his rifle. Clearly it is
the more valued possession.
Boone too is bound to objects;
Jim as the memory of a dead
man, the scalp of the Indian who
killed his brother (which he car-
ries around with him), the rifle.
He is freed only when he divorces
himself from Jim and accepts the
girl as a living thing which must
be cared for. At this point, he
burns the scalp in a ritual of
emancipation into the world of
Hawks code..
This film also contains a rath-
er notorious scene in which Kirk
Douglas' finger is amputated.
The scene, where Douglas and
his pals clamber around the
camp searching for the severed
finger because the Indians be-
lieve that you have to have all
your parts to get into heaven, is
played for comedy. Hawks ad-
mits that his first reaction to any
story is to look for the comic
angle: "A comedy is virtually the
same as an adventure story. The
difference is in the situation ..."
Bringing Up Baby features
Professor David Huxley (Cary
Grant) whose life work is the re-
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NEXT: TRUFFAUT'S "THE WILD CHILD"

RADICAL FILM SERIES
TONIGHT
OLIVER T WIST
WITH

ALEC GUINESS as fagin
ANTHONY NEWLEY as The Artful Dodger

Director--DAVID LEAH
(Bridge on the River Kwai and Lawrence of Arabia)
75c Canterbury House 7-9 1 pm.
The Michigan Daily apologizes to the patrons of Radical Film
Series for the Daily's inaccurate advertising of last week's
film. The mistake was the Daily's.

-Daily-Jim wallace
AMIRI BARAKA (Leroi Jones) at Hill Aud. last night as part of
Black Liberation Week.

.

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC and DEPARTMENT OF ART
present KURT WEILL'S OPERA
THE THREE PENNY OPERA
(IN ENGLISH)
Conductor: JOSEF BLATT Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
MARCH 26, 27, 29 and 30
at 8:00 P.M.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
ALL TICKETS $3.00
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: School of Music Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

I-I

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Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor

"A ROARING
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OPEN 12:45
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Always the finest in
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