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March 16, 1971 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-16

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Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuuesday, Mo rc h 16, 1971

REJECT CLASSIFIED PROJECTS

"""x","'15 ?: '"""""" r : "" C:?:r~fr "n":""j" "y"};'i: *** '.*i6
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Placement

1 41 T' 1 , . -,-. A

GENERAL DIVISION u Il i it i
3200 S.A.B.
The following jobs open immediately
in Ann Arbor area, others nationwide:

Schools, limit research

(Continued from page 1)
knowledge, is clearly restricted
when free discussion and open
publication is prohibited," the
Yale faculty directory states in
part.
At the University of Pennsyl-
vania, their research committee
issued a policy that "prohibited
the acceptance of ,any new clas-
sified contracts on the campus
by July 1, 1970.
At Harvard, the faculty offi-
cially voted last Dec. 1 to codify
a policy in effect for over two
decades prohibiting the Harvard
administration from administer-
ing classified research contracts.
Individual faculty members,
however, do consulting on gov-
ernment classified projects, of-
ten in the social sciences, accord-
ing to the Harvard Crimson.
The State University of New
York at Stony Brook also bars
classified research. "The spon-
soring agency may not limit the
discretion of an investigator in
communicating the results of his
work as he deems, fit. Classified
research is excluded from cam-
pus," its policy says.
At the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology, there are
limitations on classified research
on campus but such projects
are carried out at MIT's Lin-
coln and Draper Laboratories,
according to the office of the
vice president for research.

prominent institutions of the
area have declined to do so.
At Minnesota, "our policy re-
flects the basic principle that
the university not undertake re-
search, the results of which
would be classified or restricted
from the normal channels of
communication," William Shep-
herd, vice president for academic
administration, writes.
Research guidelines at Mich-
igan State explain, "The Uni-
versity should retain for its
scholars the right of first pub-
lication. The imposition of re-
striction on research results is
incompatible with the basic con-
cept of an educational institu-
tion."
"Indiana University does not
place restrictions on research
faculty members may engage iri
except that we do not accept
classified research projects or
projects which eliminate the
ability to publish results," Lynne
Merritt, vice.president and dean
for research at Indiana says.
The University of Illinois,
however, allows classified con-
tracts so long as they do not
"impair pursuit by the Univer-
sity of its basic educational and
research objectives."
In the South, Georgetown Uni-
versity also prohibits classified
research. "It's entirely antago-
nistic to the university's search
for truth and the researchers

obligation to report his findings
to his peers," President Robert
Henle, S.J., told students on
Sept. 17, 1969.
According to H. Brooks James,
vice president for research at
the University of North Caro-
lina, that school "has a general
policy of not accepting classified
research during peace time," al-
though researchers may have
access to classified documents.
One of the major institutions
in the South, the University of
Texas, does allow classified re-
search, according to the uni-
versity's public relations office.
Finally, in the West, the Uni-
versity of Colorado "will not ac-
cept sponsored projects where
the results of the work under-
taken may not be published in
literature available to the com-
munity at large."
At Stanford, classified pro-
jects were banned in 1969, the
a p p r o v e d resolution stating
"that the principle of openness
in research - the principle of
freedom of access by all interest-
ed persons to the underlying
data, to the processes and to
the final results of research-is
one of overriding importance."

."'-"*"MM5!N###M "'Mg% anufacturers Bank, Detroit. sexveral
Thicialyublictin Boftns openings for programmer analysts with e e ts n ew
The Daily Offical of thei Univer- 2-3 yrs. exper. with PL-1 and OS en-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be vironment on IBM equipment, degree
sent in TYPEWRITTEN for m to area not impt. as exper.
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before Apena Intermediate School D i s t e
2p.m., of the day preceding pub- speech pathologist. l neo
Bank of Lansing, personnel t r u s t
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap- administrator, 1 year in the area req.
pear once only. Student organiza- BA or taw degree; law degree w/out (Continued from page 1
peaontces renaen td or exper. considered.
tion notices are not accepted for Consumer Power: Jackson, schedul- John McCray, past president of
publication. For more information, ing engineer, BE in EE or CE pref., and the Students for Black Action on
phone 764-9270. 5-10 years in contract admin/ schedul- the Flint campus, said Moran is
TUESDAY, ing on construction proj., EDP and bus.,
TUESDAY, MARCH 16 tn plss, 'obviously doing a great deal of
Gustafson-Whitmer Advertising Inc., thinking about his role here."
Ann Arbor, copy writer, collateral bro- McCray was a member of the
chure material in sales promotion,
Black Liberation Week: "Technolo- journ. bckrnd. pref. with exper up to student - faculty chancellor search
gical Needs of the Black World," Sym- 2-3 yrs. in adv. committee which recommended
posium, D. Coleman and C. Kidd, mod- SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE Moran for the post.
erators, A&D Aud., 9-11 a.m. 212 S.A.B. Acrigt cry oa a
Slavic Languages and Lits-Ctr for LOWER LEVEL According to McCray, Moran had
Russian and E. Eur. Studies: A. Mied- Interviews at S.P.S., for appts and Said there were times when stu-
zyrzecki, "Modern Polish Poetry," W. details stop in or call 764-7460. dents and faculty, through striking,t
Conf. Rar., Rackham, 4:10 p.m. Today, March 16: Camp Dunmore, could bring out significant matters
English and Extension Service: S. girls, 11 - 3:30, spec. in waterfront, coperp orokedibfore.
Heaney, poetry reading, UGLI Multi- (WSI), sailing, tennis, tripping, canoe- perhaps overlooked before.
Purpose Rm., 4:10 p.m. ing, age over 20. McCray added however, that
Physics Seminar: A. Mueller, "Regge March 17, Good Humor Co., Detroit, Moran was against "disruption for
Analysis of Single Particle Spectra," job with good pay, jobs in Detroit and transient goals."
P&A Colloquium Rm, 4:15 p.m. major cities throughout country. trnitgol.
Senate Assembly (continuation March 19: Camp Conestoga, boys, in The Regents authorized Presi-
mtg.): Rackham Amph., 7:30 p.m. Ohio: 10 - 5, gen. couns. (must be able dent Fleming to proceed with the
International Students Assoc. Elec- to teach a sport), reg. nurse, spec. in appointment of Moran and are ex-
Lion: Rive Gauche, 7:30 p.m. riflery ,archery, baseball, ham radio.
Professional Theatre Program: Siam- song leader bWSIinstructors, arts and pected to confirm the appointment'
ese Connections," Mendelssohn Theatre, crafts. at their regular meeting this week.
8 P.M... --- - ~ . _
Sch. of Music: .Japanese classical::
Dance and Festival Music, Japanese No. 54103M-17J, self wind,
Music Study Group, W. Maim, director, nstant day-instant date change,
J. Malin, dancer, Rackham Lect. Hall, instantshbilinua rgls n-ho
Hall *. Spanish calendar, synchroniz~ed
8 p. second setting, blue-white
Black Liberation Week: A. Baraka dial, luminous, 229 ft.
(Leroi Jones) and The Spirit House water tested. $75.00
Movers, and Olatunji and His African
Troupe, Hill Aud., 8 p.m. S E IK
N_.LA S 7

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Golf cardigan sweater of links stitch orion
acrylic. Drombuie, lemon, medium green,
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Short sleeve polyester shirt. Blue, green,
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