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March 14, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-14

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WORLD PREMIERE

by ANTA and Hopwood Prizewinner
ransom jeffrey
THE REFUSAl
at 8:00 p.m.-Wednesday-Saturday, March 17
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE-Box Office Opens 12:30-764-5387
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS

F,

page three

$

Sti~ti!3agtn

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:
T64-0554
Page Three

Sunday, March 14, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

L

L
-20

OPENS WEDNESDAY-TICKETS NOW!

ne-ws-briefs
By The Associated Press
SOVIET TROOPS have been withdrawn from surface-to-
air missile sites along the Suez Canal, Sen. Mike Mansfield (D-
Mont.) said yesterday.
The Senate Majority Leader said that he had been advised that
Soviet advisers remain behind but Egyptian forces are in charge.
Mansfield termed this a significant development that could in-
dicate a Soviet drawback in the Middle East but added that he has
serious reservations about either the U.S. or Soviet troops becoming;
involved as part of any future Middle East peacekeeping force:
* * * .
PAUL ROSE, a 27-year-old schoolteacher and separatist, was
sentenced yesterday to life imprisonment for the strangling of
Quebec Labor Minister, Pierre Laporte.
Rose admitted taking part in the kidnaping but denied the murder
charge.
Three other persons will stand trial next week for the kidnaping
of Pierre Laporte on Oct. 10 and his murder a week later.
All four belong to the Quebec Liberation Front (FLQ) which
seeks to separate French-speaking Quebec from the rest of Canada.
THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST the supersonic transport (SST)
airplanes enlisted a French ally yesterday.
Jean-Jacques Serivan-Schreiber, a journalist and member of the
French National Assembly, said the Concorde SST is in a "financial
quagmire," with costs constantly multiplying beyond estimation.
Congress must act before the end of the month on an appropria-
tion for the Department of Transportation, and the budget included
financing for the U.S. SST project.E
* , *

Military

defied

Turk

govt.

leader

by

9th ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL. Winners and Highlights.
Three programs repeated in two auditoriums.

SUNDAY 7:00 Architecture Auditorium:
Auditorium A:
9:00 Architecture Auditorium:
Auditorium A:
11:00 Architecture Auditorium:
Auditorium A:

Program A
Program B
Program B
Program C
Program C
Program A

-Associated
Deposed Premier Demirel

Tickets go on sale at 6:00 P.M. Series tickets good
at both auditoriums.

F'
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BIG BOOK SALE IN PROGRESS
M-TH 9-11, F-SA 9-5:30, SUN 12-11 769-7940
ONE WEEK ONLY! PREVIEWS TUES.!
SEATS ON SALE! $1-$4.50!
The University of b
ProfessionalTe Program
Presents March16-21
the WORLD
PREMIERE o
ong i
Movemnt byA provocative i
Julie Arenal nwpa
("Hair", "Indians") n Wy

A GOVERNMENT AGENCY has found that millions of dol-
lars were wasted on a federal Job training program, the Milwau-
kee Sentinel reported yesterday.
According to the newspaper, a report soon to be released by the
General Accounting Office (GAO) says the Jobs in the Business Sec-
tor program fell far short of its goals for training workers and ob-
taining trainees.
The GAO report said that money was wasted on unnecessarily
long training, that trainees hired as workers weren't retained for
long, and that employers by calling their normal workers "trainees"
illegally obtained the JOBS program subsidy.
REP. HENRY S. REUSS (D-Wis.) said yesterday he wouldn't
be surprised if hundreds of wealthy persons pay no 1970 income
tax, despite provisions of the 1969 tax law designed to close loop-
holes.
The law, which became effective for 1970 tax purposes, didn't
close the biggest loophole of all. by failing to tax interest income on
state and local bonds, Reuss said.

f
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4

CARNEGIE REPORT:
Crcollege bill of rig

CHICAGO W) - The Carnegie
Commission on Higher Education
s a i d yesterday many Americans
have failed to distinguish between
dissent and disruption on the na-
tion's campuses.
It called for a "Bill of Rights
and Responsibilities" for all cam-
puses and urged their adminis-
trations to maintain constant
liaison with police to prevent dis-
orders.

'CONCEALMENT OF ATROCITIES'
Colonel accuses fellow officers

From Wire Service Reports
A Korean war hero and form-
er battalion commander in Viet-
nam has levelled charges against
a general and a colonel he ac-
cuses of covering up war crimes
in Vietnam.
Lieutenant Colonel Anthony
Herbert, who dropped out of high
school to join the army and be-
came the most decorated enlist-
ed man in the Korean War (he
won three Silver Stars, a Bronze
Star and four Purple Hearts as
a 22-year-old sergeant) is still
generally considered a steel-
nerved hero, an Army man from
the gleam of his spit-shined
shoes to the close-cropped hair
on his head.
"That's why what I'm doing
will be hard for a lot of people
to understand," he said Friday
after preparing formal military
charges against Maj. Gen. John
Barnes and Col. J. Ross Frank-
lin.
Not only are the accused men

high ranking officers, but Col-
onel Franklin was a member of
the commission that investigat-
ed an alleged massacre at My
Lai.
Barnes, assigned to the Pen-
.tagon in Washington, an d
Franklin, in South Vietnam,
have had no comment pending
an Army investigation.
Herbert's attempts to s t o p
atrocities, he said, cost him his
command of a battalion in
Barnes' 173 Airborne Brigade
and his action against his fel-
low officers now will prompt
the army to try to "throw me
out."
He said' the ultimate blame
for alleged atrocities in Vietnam
must be laid to American offic-
ers operating at levels higher
than their capabilities allow and
eager to get "as many promo-
tions as they can wh ile the
stove is hot."
A quality especially necessary

to command officers in Viet-
nam, Herbert said, is the abil-
ity to strictly control troops who
are frequently bored by inac-
tivity, demoralized by the con-
stant threat of booby traps and
frustrated by the elusiveness of.
the enemy.
"There's not much fighting in
Vietnam, contrary to all the
publicity," he said. "Actions are
very short, small and very light
comparatively speaking. People
still get killed and there are a
lot of booby traps, but actual
face-to-face fighting in one unit
is not a day after day affair.
"Men are keyed up. They
walk through the jungle d a y
after day and lose men on booby
traps, and t h e y don't get a
chance to really fight.
"Then they get hold of a
prisoner. This is their first
chance to strike at the enemy.
And some men, if not restricted,
will do this."

Clark Kerr, former pres
the University of Califor
chairman of the 19 -
group that prepared the
told a news conference t
report was being issued
time because "many camp
engaged in drawing up co
and we are in a period of
But he added, "I don'
anyone can conclude that
unrest is all over . . . my
that there is a higher leve
satisfaction among studer
ever in history.'
The report's three chief
mendations urged the ado
all campuses of a "Bill of
and Responsibilities," the
ment of contingency plan
disruptive emergencies a
creation of effective judic
cedures.
It said, "Too many men
the campus have been r
to give up the myth of
rupted serenity and thus
campuses have adequately
through t h e handling o
gencies."
Close contact must be m
ed between the campus on
hand on the police and ci
the other, the report said.
The Carnegie report sai
campus protest has tal
form of dissent, n o t dis
However, there has been
tendency in the public rea
protest activity as well as
tion.
"The American public s
show limited tolerance f
protest activities, even wh
are within the bounds of
"This substantial disf
suggests that many Arx
may n o t distinguish suf
between organized disse
disruption."
I OIRT MICHR
ROFORD POLLAI

ANKARA Il-The president
of the Turkish Senate, a form-
er air force commander, de-
fied the country's military
leaders yesterday by calling
for a national referendum to
.. determine "real public opin-
ion."
Senate Chairman Tekin Ari
burun denied that the Senate
was responsible for t h e na-
tion's problems and was cheer-
ed loudly by Justice party
senators while opposition sen-
ators shouted disagreement.
<_^... The military ousted Premier
Suleyman Demirel's Justice party
government in a bloodless coup on
Friday. Turkey's four to p com-
manders .had blamed the govern-
ment and the Parliament for
leading the country into anarchy
and failing to pass needed reforms.
i Press The nation seemed headed for
a form of government somewhere
between a parliament democracy
----Oand military rule.
The generals have set themselves
as a high court to review Turkish
politics, giving parliamentary de-
mocracy another chance but have
retained veto power.
S "Thegenerals have no explicit
constitutional right to interfere
in politics. As members of the Na-
tional Security Council, they only
have the right "to communicate
necessary recommendations to the
Council of Ministers to assist in
ident of decisions and coordination on
nia and matters of national security."
member The armed forces, who stepped
report, in 1960 and ran the country for 17
hat the months, have chosen to interpret
at this this article as giving them the
uses are right to interfere.
ides . . . Their view is taken to mean
peace." that if the government allows the
't think country to drift into a situation
campus where rightist and leftist fanatics
view is are disrupting the nation, allied
1 of dis- soldiers are kidnaped and legis-
its than lation is stalled by political bick-
ering, national security is involv-
recom- ed and the military has the right
ption by to take part in the decision-mak-
f Rights ing process.
develop- In another development, Presi-
ning for dent. Cevdet Sunay, starting con-
and the sultation to form a new govern-
:ial pro- ment, met with the fo u r com-
manders who delivered the ulti-
mbers of matum to Demirel: Gen. Memduh
eluctant Tagmac, chief of the general
uninter- staff; the army commander, Gen.
too few Faruk Gurler; the air force com-
thought mander, Gen. Mushin Batur, and
t emer- the navy commander, Adm. Cel-
al Eyiceoglu.
aintain- The president is meeting poli-
th - tical leaders Sunday.
the one Halil Tunc, secretary general of
ourts on Turkey's largest labor federation,
said what the commanders called
d "Most for in their communique "is what
ken the the whole nation wants."
sruption. A joint statement by a coali-
s 0 m e tion of intellectual groups repre-
ction to senting teachers, students, law-
disrup- yers and engineers said: "All re-
formist measures to realize the
eems to basic needs of the nation will be
or mass supported."
en these
the law. The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
approval aged by students at the University Of
mericans Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
fficiently Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
nt and Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
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L i through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
D tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

UITTU FMUSS
AMl BIG HALSYd

this eiD
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Bob White
accompanied by
David
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FRI. - SAT. - SUN.
"Bob White . . . singing
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"A ROARING
VISUAL DELIGHT!1"
-L.A. TIMES
"A MUST"
-PLAY BOY
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1:15-3-5-7-9 p.m.
Always the finest in
Screen entertainment

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