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March 13, 1971 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 13, 19714

PageTenTHE ICHGAN AIL

Court hits
school fee
collection
By GERI SPRUNG
The state Court, of Claims in
Lansing has issued temporary re-
straining order against the Re-
gents which would allow residents
of University married housing not
to pay an assessment to the Ann"
Arbor school board until a final
hearing is held.
The court also issued an order
for the Regents to show cause why
they should not refund the funds
collected from the residents since
August 1, 1970 and cease all fur-
ther assessments.
A final hearing on the case is
scheduled for March 25.
The Regents agreed last year to
pay the school board $252,000 this
fiscal year for the use of its fa-
cilities by school-age children in
1,245 tax-free University married
housing units. The Regents decid-
ed to raise $87,384 of that sum by
assessing the residents of married
housing six dollars per month.
Twenty-one residents from
Northwood Apartments and Uni-
versity Terrace filed a class s u I t
against the assessment last month
contending that the Regent's ac-
tion is unlawful because "no sta-
tute, to the knowledge of t h e
plaintiffs, authorizes the Regents1
to make payments in lieu of taxes1
to any taxing authority including
the school district."
About 200 families living in the
apartments have children and a
total of about 386 children from
the apartments are enrolled with-
in the Ann Arbor public school
system, according to the residents'
brief.
Since the University is tax-
exempt, there has been a long dis-
pute between the University and
the school board, with the board
contending that these children are
being educated free.
The suit was originally filed in
the state Court of Appeals be-
cause the University is a con-.
stitutonal corporation. The ap-
peals court, however, denied juris-
diction since the case involves a
refund from a state agency. The
case was then refiled in the state
Court of Claims.
Texas Regents
approve S purr
The University of Texas Re-
gents yesterday confirmed offic-
(ally their appointment of Steph-
en Spurr, vice president and dean
of the graduate school here, as
president of that university's Aus-
tin campus.
Spurr's appointment had been
announced last month, but need-
ed regental action to become of-
ficial.
Spurr will assume his duties at
Texas July 1, when its current
president will leave to become pre-
sident of Houston's Rice Univer-
sity.
Spurr is a nationally prominent
ecologist who served as Dean of
the School of Natural Resources
before assuming his present posi-
tion here.
A spokesman for the Daily Tex-
an, campus newspaper at the Uni-
versity of Texas, said that the
predominant student opinion
towards Spurr's appointment was
one of curiosity.
Although the Daily Texas had
supported another candidate for
the presidency, Page Keeton, dean
of the Texas law school, the Texan
reporter added there is no hostile
feeling towards Spurr.

Glee CIub to
tour in Europe
The University's Men's Glee Club
will begin its fifth European tour
on May 31.
In a six-week span it will per-
form in cities such as London,
Paris, Vienna, Prague, Venice,
Berlin, Brussels, and Amsterdam
and will culminate the tour by com-
peting in the International Musical
Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales.
This will mark the club's fourth
appearance 'at the festival, where
it won first place in 1959 and 1963
and took second in 1967 on its
world tour. The competition fea-
tures groups from all over the
world.

RESEARCH PROTEST:
Fasters hold rally

(Continued from page 1)
committee chosen at a mass meet-
ing Thursday night told the audi-
ence that volunteers for dorm raps,
leafletting, and putting out a
booklet on militaryand classified
research were needed.
The participants rejected a sug-
gestion that anyone who sympa-
thized with them, but would not
themselves fast, be allowed to wear
the symbolic red armband. Also
denied was a motion to move the
vigil to either theiUndergraduate
or Graduate Library.
Advocates of the motion felt a
move to either library would make
their presence more visible over
the weekend when few classes are
held near the Fishbowl.
The group, however, decided to
continue the vigil at the Fishbowl
along with another rally there on
Monday. Meetings will be held in
the Union lobby today and to-
morrow.
Near Eastern Languages Prof.
John Bailey, recently returned
from consultations in Paris and
Washington with U.S., and North
and South Vietnarpese officials,
spoke at the conclusion of the one-
hour meeting.
He explained that "both sides
are still intent on victory" and
that "the United States will main-
tain a permanent military pres-
ence in Vietnam until a pro-U.S.
government is installed," he said.
"The U.S. is using South Viet-
namese soldiers as mercenaries,"
he said. He called the prisoner of
issue "phony" because, "Hanoi has
released all of its prisoners and is
willing to negotiate for their re-
turn as soon as the United States
gets out."
In assessing the situation at the
Paris peace talks, Bailey said that
if the United States is serious
about withdrawing "the Nixon ad-
ministration can get what it wants
fairly."
In related activity yesterday, the
weekly closed meeting of the Sen-
ate Assembly Committee on Clas-
sified Research was interrupted by
the presence of Marty Scott, presi-
dent of S t u d e n t Government
Council.

Scott appeared a few minutes
before the meeting was scheduled
to start in the Administration
Bldg. After a warning from com-
mittee chairman dental Prof. Ger-
ald Charbeneau, Scott voiced his
intention of remaining throughout
the meeting to observe the com-
mittee's work.
Then, guarded by University se-
curity personnel, Charbeneau and
the rest of the 12-man committee
retreated to another room where
the meeting was completed in pri-
vate, without incident.
Two students
sentenced
(Continued from page 1)
Harrison had already been pin-
ned to the ground by another of-
ficer.
In passing sentence on Harri-
son, Judge William Ager told of
letters he received from members
of the jury which requested a len-
ient sentence
Morton Leitson, Harrison's at-
torney, said the case will be ap-
pealed.
PREGNANT?
NEED HELP?
YOUR QUESTIONS ON
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ANSWERED BY
PROFESSIONALS
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24 hours 7 days
FOR TOTALLY
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Legal Abortions Without Delay

uoy
gyHENRY
G* BSO P

4

-Associated Press
Father knows best?
David Eisenhower is handed his Navy commission from his father-in-law President Nixon yester-
day in ceremonies at Newport Navy Base. Ensign Eisenhower will go to Virginia for further
training.
REQUEST TO FLEMING:
Women's board seeks students

Whether the Paulist works
in a ghetto, a college campus,
a city parish or a remote
corner of the United States,
he is serving.
The Paulist is ministering
with words, deeds and sacra-
ment .. .and zealous care to
the needs of God's People
everywhere. He is meeting
today's problems with thoughts
of those that will arise
tomorow.
That is the Paulist way. It
isn't easy but the worthwhile
things of life seldom are.
If you are interested in
learning more about the Paulist
priesthood, write to:
Riev. Donald C. Campbell, CS,.
Vocation Director
C)aUlfist
rFatheig
Room 113
415 West 59th Street
New York, N.Y. 10019

- .. .i
-
Litter bug Litter bug
Have you no eyes?
You're strangling our streets!
o try to be wise.
Litter bug Litter bug
Have you no hands?
Our parks-are disgraceful!
Think. Understand. f
Litter bug Litter bug
Have you no pride?
Our highways are ravaged!
Don't throw things outside.
Litter bug Litter bug
Have you no heart?
This land's getting ugly!
Let's change things-
Let's start.
Keep America Clean.
Keep America Beautiful.,
v s n n 0d . f E Pa
Advertising contributed for the public good,

By TAMMY JACOBS 1
The University's Women's Com-
mission, which currently has no
student members, has requested
that President Robben Fleming
add to its ranks two students. The
members would be appointed from
a proposed Student Government
Council slate of three graduate
and three undergraduate women.
The 11-person commission was
appointed in January by Fleming
to work on the University's af-

firmative action plan for equal
employment.
At its weekly meeting yesterday,
the commission discussed the pro-
posed addition of students and
heard statements from SGC Pres-
ident Marty Scott and Graduate
Assembly (GA) President Ja n a
Bommersbach, who each -claimed
the right for their organization to
select the slate from which the
graduate women will be chosen.
Scott pointed out that SGC is

Residents return from
Viet peace discussions

(Continued from page)
American and South Vietnamese,1
the participants concluded theE
United States and South Vietnam
expect their superior firepower in
Indochina, estimated to be 5004
times that of Communist forces,
to defeat the forces of the PRO
and North Vietnam.
The North Vietnamese and PRG
delegations felt that no amount3
of firepower, short of the use of
nuclear weapons, could eliminate
the resistance of the Vietnamese
people.
They seemed determined to con-
tinue their struggle, feeling that,
their victory is inevitable, accord-,
ing to the Ann Arbor delegation.
The groups' itinerary also in-,
cluded meetings with Laotian stu-
dents, a former member of the
Lon Nol government of Cambodia
who is presently an exile in Paris,
representatives of t h e "third
force" in South Vietnam - those
who support neither the Provis-
ional Revolutionary Government
or the Saigon regime - and sev-
eral journalists considered to be
experts on the Indochina conflict.
Their conversations with the
neutralist elements f i o m South
Vietnam convinced the partici-
pants that the Thieu-Ky govern-
ment will not be re-elected in the
Vietnamese presidential election
scheduled for October, 1971 if neu-
tralist candidates are allowed to
run.
According to Bailey, a bill pro-
hibiting neutralists, Communists
and those not living in S o u t h
Vietnam for the last t e n years
from running in the election, has
received approval in one house of
the Vietnamese legislature.
The final category would pre-
vent the. candidacy of General
"Big" Minh, whom many members
of the conference feel could win
the election. Minh has taken a
UE E I

more conciliatory position toward
the PRG than the Thieu-Ky gov-
ernment.
Fuller said the t r i p to Paris
made many members of the ,con-
ference believe President Nixon
was exploiting the prisoner of war
issue for political purposes.
Conversations with the North1
Vietnamese and journalists w h o,
had been to North Vietnam indi-
cated that American prisoners
were not being mistreated, s h e
said.
Conference members went to
Washington, D.C. Thursday to dis-
cuss their trip with government
officials. Hathaway met with mil-
itary and civilian officials in the
defense department a n d Bailey
confered with Michigan Senators
Philip Hart a n d Robert Griffin
and Ann Arbor Congressmen Mar-
vin Esch. Both men said t h e y
found the meetings encouraging.
Conference members queried the
U.S. and South Vietnamese dele-
gations about t h e possibility of
off-shore oil rights being granted
to U.S. oil companies by the Sai-
gon government as Senate For-
eign Relations Committee chair-
man William Fulbright (D-Ark.),
has charged, but received no com-
ment.
The journalists who met with
conference m e m b e r s, however,
felt that the granting of s u c h
rights would increase the difficul-
ty of a U.S. withdrawal from In-
dochina.
The conference was organized
by three national organizations:
t h e American Friends Service
Committee, The Fellowship of Re-
conciliation and Clergy and Lay-
men Concerned About Vietnam.

the official student government
for all University students, a n d
therefore should select the panel.
Bommersbach claimed that SGC
doesn't effectively represent grad-
uate students, a claim that has led
to much disagreement between
SGC and GA in the past several
months. GA itself is presently fac-
ing charges before Central Stu-
dent Judiciary that it doesn't legi-
timately represent graduate stu-
dents.
The commission, after m o r e
discussion . between Scott and
Bommersbach, decided to ask SGC
to submit recommendations, and
told Council to give "careful con-
sideration" to the graduate women
who have already expressed inter-
est.
In other action, the commission
decided to have its members form
small subcommittees to review se-
parately the goals and timetables
for employment of women that
were submitted by each organiza-
tional unit within the University.
Summaries of the goals and
timetables were filed with the De-
partment of Health, Education and
Welfare (HEW) last week, in
compliance with a 90-day dead-
line HEW had set for presentation
of that information by the Univer-
sity.
HEW last term withheld federal
contracts from the University or
the grounds that it discriminates
against women.
Commission members had nc
other reaction about the affirma-
tive action program 'filed w i t h
HEW, part of which they had
worked on.
I

l
f
t
1'
t'
a
t
1
i
I
1
S
J
1

Sony Model 20
Makes Driving a Pleasure

Easy to Operate-.-
Easy on Your Purse
*NY. SUPERSCOPE

Thinking about Mysticism?
Grad group discussion this Sunday night,
March 14-1p.m. - at Hillel
Rabbi Poupko on "Mysticism as an Approach
to Religious Life"

t

I

Il A-t BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing

FREE PEOPLE'S CLINIC, INC.
Annual Membership Meeting
for
Clinic Staff, Patients and Community

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"' '1"Quality Sound Through Quality Equipment"

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A professional
ABORTION
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BOARD FOR STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS
" Two student positions (one undergrad and
one graduate student) are being elected
this term.
" Statements of candidacy must be filed by
Monday, March 15, 5 p.m.
" Information and statements available 1546
Student Activities Building

SUNDAY, MARCH 14,1971
7:30 P.M.
School of Public Health Ad.
(on Observatory)

11

nexpensive
can be set up on an'
outpatient basis by calling
The Problem Pregnancy
Referral Service
215-722-5360
24 HOURS-7 DAYS
for professional, confidential
and caring help

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New From Levi!
For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans,
$1.50

In the Country
of the Young
by JOHN W. ALDRIDGE
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WATERBED TEAM?
WHAT DO THEY DO?
WILL I GET SEASICK?
IS IT GOOD FOR MY HEALTH?
HOW CAN I MAKE THE TEAM?
Find the answers to these fascinating questions SAT-
URDAY NIGHT with Tom, Harry and the Ann Arbor
Allstar Waterbed Team. Practice your moves and
come on down.
214 E. WASHINGTON
Wave of the Future Waterbed Co.
' iOo MAYNPKp
ANN AMOR
MICHIGAN
7698511

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FOREIGN STUDENT

Make tracks.
Hush Puppies multi-color track shoes
come in a whole gang of colors.
One's gotta be just your speed.
Work boots, too. No-nonsense styling.
Low cuts or high-tops.
Plenty of mileage in these suede

leather shoes with tough

i

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