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March 13, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-13

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~The Twelve Chairs'
is uproarious fun!
has to
see it!

Wo men 's

adocate

at

'U

By LINDA DREEBEN
"One of the most positive things
about this job is trying to help women
with their problems," says Clair Rumel-
hart, the University's first Women's
Avcate.
tions on the third floor of the Union,
Rumelhart works in many capacities
for all women connected with the Uni-
versity-
Her official position is Women's Ad-
vocate, one of four "advocate" posi-
tions created in September by the Of-
fice of Student Organizations. The posi-
tions were created to help student

groups "get through bureaucratic chan-
nels." .
Rumeihart's job brings her in con-
tactc witost of the women's groups
on campus
"I don't see myself as a spokeswo-
man for all women's groups," Rumel-
hart says, however. "I'm trying to
something."
In addition to gatthering, maintaining
and distributing information relating to
women and women's groups, Rumelhart
counsels all women or organizations
who request her aid.
Rumeihart says she considers her po-
sition as a "positive input to the ad-
ministration." However, she adds, she

must balance this role with her posi-
tion as an advocate for women on cam-
pus.
"But my first responsibility is to my
constituency-the women on campus,"
she says. "Advocate means dealing
with another group from a biased posi-
tion."
Recently Rumelhart has been in-
volved in activities aimed at the repeal
of Michigan's abortion law. She says
most of her energy has been directed
toward informing women about today's
demonstration in Lansing demanding
the repeal of the state's abortion laws.
"I see total repeal of Michigan's
abortion laws as imperative in the

struggle for women to control their own
bodies," she says.
Rumelhart and other women on cam-
pus have also been gathering informna-
tion and formulating proposals for a
female studies program.
The program, according to Rumel-
hart, would provide both academic and
non-academic courses to be taken for
Inaddition, Rumelhart has been
working with women's liberation groups
on campus.
,"I don't see the women's lib move-
ment as dead," she comments. "It has
a different orientation. It's reaching
out, broadening, as well as working
internally."
See WOMEN, Page 7

Clair Rumeihart

Sudent Gov't. ElCions
Marc 30 and 31
and for
Petitions available at 1546 SA B
DEADLINE FOR FILING IS
FRIDAY, MARCH 19 AT 5:00 P.M
A l.OG NAR .0pK
A T TODAY'S STUDENTS
CAMPUS! AND
GRACE -WH O LOVED
TH EM ALL...
TWIETALE OF TH E
UNDER 15 YEARS
A TWIN PEAKS PRODUCTION C 0 10 R
ONLY FOR THE MATURE ADULT
CONTINUOUS SHOWING FROM 1:.00 O'CLOCK
art0 RE UM

page hr eNEWS PHONE: 764-0552
Siri~i an IIUSINE~SS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, March 13, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

news briefs
By The Associated Press

THE FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) has taken action
to partially stop the distribution of more than 14 million plastic-
encased razor blades in newspaper advertising supplements in over
a dozen major cities.
The FTC issued the unfair trade complaint against the Phillip Mor-
rsGeryasdThain, of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, said the'
FTC had received numerous complaints that the razor blades' had in-
jured a number of children who got the advertising insert before their
parents could put it out of their reach.
The decision to seek an injunction, against what FTC general coun-1
sel Joseph Martin termed "an imminent danger to health and safety,"
is unprecedented in the commission's 60-year history,.

*

*

THE SENATE voted 82 to 0 yesterday for a five billion dollar,
increase in benefits for 26 million Social Security recipients.
The provision was tacked onto a bill raising tihe national debt limit
$35 billion to a record $430 billion.
The bill has been sent to conference with the House.
Under the Social Security provision all persons receiving retire-
ment, family survivor and disability payments would get at least a ten r
percet boost retroactive to Jan. 1 this year. CONSTRUCTION WORKERS protesting
Social Security taxes would be increased to finance the higher tering Newport Navy Base by Defense
benefits. m encement address for the Officer Cau
There would be an increase next year from $7,800 to $9,000 in the David Eisenhower.
wage base on which taxes are paid. This would mean a tax hike of --- _ - - ---
$62.40 each for an employe earning at least $9,000 and his employer. UN S A IE I G
* * *UUUAMET G:
PROMINENT BLACK AMERICANS will lead a memorial serv-
ice today for Whitney Young Jr. in Lagos, Nigeria.
The 49-year-old civil rights leader died while swimming at an ocean i s n g r d
beach in Lagos Thursday, after apparently suffering fromi a heart
aThake main eulogy will be delivered by Rev. Jesse Jackson, an asso- w t i l
ciate of the late Dr. Martin Luther King. w i h h s a l
The body of the civil rights leader will be flown to the U.S. Sunday.
Young was in Lagos attending a series of African-American dia- By The Associated Press 'out o
logues under the auspices of the African-American Institute. 'Presidential adviser Henry Kis- ness."

-Associated Press
d hat s hit Nixon
President Nixon's economic policies were stopped from en-
Department police yesterday. Nixon was delivering the corn-
didates School graduating class that included his son-in-law,

Workers
march in
N. Ireland
BELFAST, Northern Ireland
ti- About 3,000 shipyard
workers of all faiths marched
silently through the streets of
thei asympath y for th e fam-
ilies of three British soldiers
slain by extremists.
M e n of Belfast's sprawling
complex of shipyards tied up traf-
fic and drew crowds of onlookers
during their march. They demand-
ed instant internment without trial
for known extremists.
The three soldiers w e re slain
Wednesday night when street
fighting broke out between terror-,
ists and British troops. The fight-
ing sprang out of a campaign by
minority Catholics for equal vot-
ing, housng, and working rghts.
on t h e outlawed Irish Republic
army (IRA). But two warring fac-
tions of the IRA have denied they
had anything to do with the kill-
'mgs. The IRA wants largely Prot-
estant Northern Ireland united by
focewth thne Irish Republic,
The workers h a v e decided to
show their disgust and that of the
ordinary people irrespective of sec-
tarian issues at the murder of
those three soldiers," one spokes-
~of the camel. We don't want any
more confrontations or riots In
this city."
A special police murder team of
20 men found their inquiries balk-
ed to a large extend by the fear of
reprisals against informers In-
stilled over the years Into many
sections of the population.
"Any known informers have
been assassinated," said one Bel-
fast observer. He believed up to
60 people have been murdered i1n
Republican guerrilla warfare in
that time-and only 10 murder
charges have been brought by
police.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged .by students at the University of
Mihigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Clas postageaid rat Ann Arbor, Mich-
IMichigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunda crpmorning niver-
carrier, $10 by mai.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by trnall.

eged kidnappr

f proportion to its useful-

ISRAEL disclosed yesterday that it had made a new bid to
Egypt for detailed, concrete discussions toward a peace agreement.
Ambassador Yosef Tekoah of Israel indicated to reporters that on
Thursday he had given the bid to Gunnar Jarring, U.N. special repre-
sentative to the Middle East, and Jarring had relayed it to Ambassador
Mohammed el-Zayyat of Egypt.
ATTY- GEN. JOHN MITCHELL said yesterday the Justice
Dept. is studying ways to limit a defendant's right of appeal;.
"If our justice system is going to deter crime, each case must have
a predictable time when it can be said with finality, 'this man is inno-
cent or guilty' and, if he is guilty, 'this man must now pay the pen-
alty,' " Mitchell said.
Limiting appeals and other legal tactics that can delay execution
of a sentence was among three proposals Mitchell put forward in what
he termed a prmgram to deliver a "knockout blow" to organized crime.

singer met last Saturday with three
of sthe peace militants who have
been accused as co-conspirators in
an alleged plot to kidnap him.
Meeting with Kissinger, national
security adviser to President Nix-
-on, were Tom Davidson, 25, peace
organizer, son of an Episcopal
bishop and former Eagle Scout;
William Davidon, 44, a Quaker and
professor of physics at Haverford
College; and Sister Beverly Bell,
44( of the Sisters of Notre Dame de
Davion said yesterday they and
Kissinger "talked over the pros
and cons of war."
Davidon said the unusual meet-
ing was "interesting" and "im-
portant" but "should not be inflated

"These kind of discussions have
some value," he said in an inter-
view. "Meetings like this won't
change an individual's mind. It can
only provide an insight into the
person."
Davidon said he was moved by
the hope of "touching Henry Kis-
singer the man," but he also
acknowledged "a demented rea-
son" for being attracted to the
meeting.
"I thought that while he was
talkingeto use fo whatever legt
what he usually does," Davidon
said, "using that awful power he
has."
"There we were," said Davidon,
"accused of wanting to bomb, sit-
ting with a man whose policies had
brought about a bombing that was
actually going on as we talked. -
"I was talking to a man who con-

[siders mass murder, in certain cir-
cumstances, justified," Davidon
said. "I told him I thought the war
had no legitimacy."
The metn a ragdb
peace faster Brian Mc ned-
scribed as a friend of both parties.
''Ther eepue an inss"
said Davidon ofuse 8nd minute
meeting. "There were good things
and bad things about the discus-
"Kissinger defended the admin-
istration in its basic essentials on
the war," Davidon ssaid. "'We told
mediately, why war was useless.
"He didn't inflate the small
things into major ones and neither
did we.
''I think I understand Kissinger
a bit better. It was a chance to
clarify our own thoughts and to
talk straight out with one of the
people who has influence in the
policy making structure."

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A provocative
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"A ROARING VISUAL DELIGHT"
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