100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, January 10, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ri

Page Sev
PRE-CLASSIFICATION BLUES

SUMMER JOBS
IN
W ASH INGTOND.C.
Work in Congressional officest
and government agencies
MASS MEETING
Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1971-7:30 p.m.
UG LI Multi-Purpose Room
95% of the Reading Population Reads Only 250 to
300 Words Per Minute or Less
FAST READING'
Is Nt Dificut to' Learn'
Those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Towerj
Hotel achieved speeds of 800 to 2000 w.p.m. with the some or
increased comprehension they had at their slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN: -
--save hours, use your time moreI
efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster
than you do now
-improve your comprehension and
increase your enjoyment of
reading material
at a cost less than HALF that of other commercial
reading courses offered in this area!
Bring a book to a free, live demonstration of the reading skills which will be
taught in a GUARANTEED course offered this semester
Demonstrations this week-Tues., Thurs., Jan. 12, 14
7:30 P.M.
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So.
Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

200 winter term courses close early

I
I
i
I
r
i
I
I
I
i
i
i
f
i
E
E

(Continued from Page 1I ginally, but were told it was clos- Later this term the college plans tration in LSA departments with4
foreign language courses, resulting ed." to run a preferential advance preference given to students with;
in more students choosing o t h e r IIn the near future, Shaw says classification period in w h I c h higher grade-points, eliminating
electives; the literary college is going to es- students would list their course courses with low enrollment al-
The desirability of certain tablish a "modified priority system elections as if every course was together and allowing unlimitedj
courses over others, resulting in of advance classification", which open and available to them. enrollments in every course.
the quick closing of more popular OuThd giviestudents w he Ths, Shaw claims, will give the Shaw is quick to stress that the
courses; and greatest need, such as concentra- college an accurate indication of 1 advance classification process it-
Phyca restrats suh s t and graduating seniors, first what courses students would elect self is not entirely to blame for
" Phsicl retrantssuc asaccess to courses.l
staffing problems, room size lim- Also in the planning stage is a t.e
i new form of course election card,
Several LSA administrators are which would indicate optional In the near future, Assistant Dean Shaw says
presently looking for ways to in- elections of a student, enabling the literary college is going to establish a "modh i
sure that students will be able to them to be immediately substitu-i'
elect their first choice courses. ted for his first choices in t h e led priority system of advance classification,"
Shaw says we will be continu- event that any of them closed. which tould tu ' w*1 *e
ing to work with the departments, Such a process would save the t ies1esw~l ,egee
urging them to find reasonable student from a repeat experience need, such as concentrators and graduating sen- 1
limits to course enrollment, an d of the pre-classification process, - -
stick to them." Shaw adds that and virtually guarantee that he Fors, first access to courses.t
one serious difficulty to be over- would at least receive his second s' m s
come is the inconsistency withi choice of courses.
which course enrollment is hand- Shaw adds that steps are being if they could, and would assist de- closed courses in that it does not
led. taken to shorten the advance partments in determining which produce the problem, but merely
"Many courses have pre-estab- classification period and develop courses to add section to and reports it.j
lished limits to their enrollment, a more accurate information sys- which ones to cut back. I think the advance classifica-
but end up letting in additional tem so the period could be held Some things which Shaw says tion process and the counseling
students at a later time," he ex- later in the term, providing a bet- have been considered, but will not systems are the media whichj
plains. "This frustrates students ter situation in which to deal with be put into effect include limiting merely transmit a bad message,"e
who wanted to take the course ori- last minute developmens' the enrollment of LSA courses only he explains. "Students tend to be-E
to LSA students, putting absolute come disgusted with them because

enough desirable spaces in cours-
es to go around,"
"The answer lies either in
somehow acquiring more funds
from outside, or in a fairly major
readjustment in the way funds are
currently employed," Shaw says.
Two subjects of the literary col-
lege remained relatively unaffect-
ed by course closings - the Pilot
Program and the Course Mart.
The Pilot Program, an exper-
imental program based at A I i c e
Lloyd Halleprovides Lloyd stu-
dents wi h the opportunity to
take courses together in generally
small groups. Students need not
live at Lloyd, or belong to t h e
Pilot Program, however, in order
to elect a Pilot course.

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

uniform limits on course enroll- they deliver unpleasant news,
ment, limiting access to concen- namely, that there are simply not
r p

\A I_ A

PREGNANT? NEED HELP?
PREGNANT? NEED HELP? Abortions are now legal in New
York City up to 24 weeks. The Abortion Referral Service will
provide a quick and inexpensive end to your pregnancy. We
are a member of the National Organization to Legalize
Abortion. CALL 1-215-878-5800 for totally confidential in-
formation. There are no shots or pills to terminate a preg-
nancy. These medications are intended to induce a late per-
iod only. A good medical test is your best 1st action to insure
your chance for choice. Get a test immediately. Our preg-
nancy counseling service will provide totally confidential
alternatives to your pregnancy. We have a long list of those
we have already assisted should you wish to verify this serv-
ice. COPY OUR NUMBER FOR FUTURE REFERENCE:
1-215-878-5800.

:
a
;

Pilot courses have not suffere
a fate similar to most LSA coun
es, primarily because they hai
not been as well publicized,
The Course Mart, which offer
courses not available through tl"
regular departments, has increaw
ed course enrollments as perplex
ed students seek a way out of tlh
course-closing quandary.
"I never even knew the Cour
Mart existed before," said an LS.
sophomore, "but now I've got I
sign up for two Course Mai
courses just to have 12 credit
Everything else is closed."
COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT

Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Borbeque
-Open--
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 o~m.--Fri.-Sat.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Caterinq
769-2330

Il

615 LU. Aw
Join The Dai
CIRCULATION
Cone in any afternoo
420 Maynard

903 the university cellar
NOW HAS
ly
DEPT.OTS
n
ALL AT LEAST 25% OFF
LIST PRICE
PLUS
4% Sales Tax Saving On All Books

t"
-

i .
I !I

FOR

'SUBLETTING
YOUR APART

WENT

H ER'S
A

Advertise

COMING
MARCH 21
Ad
Deadline
LARCH

10 ARKET/N A
.a~CFIE A/

in

P

If it's classical music on records .

. .

4ga
AIICLI!3an
~aii

If it's open reel tapes . .
If it's cassettes .
IF ITS
Quality . Service . Satisfaction
YOU NEED

ummer
ublel

12
Watch the Daily

Em m -

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan