100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

K.{; : R;

Of
by
MAULSBY KIMBALL of New York
MICHIGAN LEAGUE, Rooms 4 and 5
Thurs.-Fri., March 11-12-10:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
WATER COLOR DEMONSTRATION
"The Search for the Spiritual in Painting"
Thurs.-Fri., March 11-12-3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Michigan League, Henderson Room, 3rd Floor
Sponsored by the ANTHROPOSOPHICAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION
}} ~f:. ::: ":"r.'d f;?:. r:..{... ..: f..}''...'......',... : .!}-} . :: . .. ?.;o }: '::,";: -.. . -':{

_ :::{ice 1
f 1{1{1{
t !
I
3
z

Local program to aid drug addicts

By ZACHARY SCHILLER

A hard drug treatment and rehabili-
tation program coordinated by the Wash-
tenaw County Community Mental Health
Center will begin operations within the
next month.
At first the program will be able to pro-
vide only outpatient services for most
patients, with occasional periods of brief
hospitalization for severe cases.
As it grows, the program hopes to ex-
pand its services, and to eventually pro-
vide extensive counseling, psychotherapy,
medical care, and vocational guidance to

gram will provide methadone treatment
only when absolutely necessary.
The first of two centers to begin opera-
tion will be located in Ypsilanti, and will
begin its operations latethis month or
early in April. Organizers of the project
expect the second center to open in Ann
Arbor in July.
Directors of the program emphasize that
all cases will be strictly confidential, and
that there will be no punitive legal ac-
tions directed at the participating addicts.
The program's immediate plans are
severely limited by its low budget. Pre,-
ently, $111,000 has been received from
state, federal and local agencies.
Directors of the. program feel that with
this amount they can only begin to tackle

the problem. They are anticipating diffi-
culty in locating and funding adequate
operating space and are seeking donated
or low-rent facilities.
So far, St. Joseph's Hospital has offered
to provide some free medical services..
Beds for a limited number of addicts will
be available in the Ypsilanti State Hos-
pital and in the Neur'opsychiatric Insti-
tute at University Hospital.
Directors expect to coordinate services
with local organizations already attempt-
ing to deal with crisis drug situations. In
addition to the small number of workers
which the program will be able to employ,
the directors are looking for competent ex-
addicts to help in counseling.
Richard Gilmore, administrator of the

program, said yesterday that he hopes for
a rapid expansion of the program so that
services can be enlarged and improved. In
its first year of operation, the program
will hopefully be able to help 150 addicts
on an outpatient basis.
In a written statement of the goals and
extent of the program, coordinators said
that even with the assistance of the various
agencies which are presently attempting
to work with the drug situation, "we see
ourselves only beginning to scratch the
surface of the problem."
To treat more severe 'gases of drug ad-
diction, extended periods of treaiment and
possible institutionalization are necessary,
which is beyond the present capacity of
this new program, the statement added.

the addicts who participate in
gram.
According to current plans,
page three

the pro-
the pro-

im4c

ir igttn

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
M EM ti BUSNESSPHONE:
764-0554
Page Three

-1 m a

3020 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsi & A.A.
Box Office Open 6:00
NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
FRIDAY
Saturday & Sunday
1, 3, 5, 7,9
Every Wednesday
IS
LADIES' DAY
All Ladies 1-6 P.M. 75c
IT'S FAMILY
ENTERTAINMENT

1

Friday, March 12, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

E
. _

nBeywsTAbriefs
By The Associated Press

I

WE'RE
HERE

N~
N

a
WI
2.
W,
p,
a
!

WAYSIDE
THEATRE
-MAR

A VETERAN COMBAT OFFICER accused two Army com-
manders yesterday of covering up incidents of murder and torture
of Vietnamese citizens.
Lt. Col. Anthony Herbert, a 22-year Army veteran, said the statute
of limitations will run out April 4, unless the Army brings charges
against Maj. Gen. John Barnes and Col. J. Ross Franklin.
Herbert charges the two officers covered up atrocities, including
three murders and instances of torture, during a 58 day period in 1969.
SCOTLAND YARD DETECTIVES roamed the streets of Belfast
yesterday in search of the slayer of three British soldiers killed
Wednesday night.
In London, a member of the House of Commons demanded imme-
diate internment of all members of the outlawed Irish Republican Army,
suspected of the killings.
The bodies of the three young soldiers, out of uniform and unarmed,
were found on a mountain road leading from Belfast to the airport.
* * .*
NOBEL ECONOMIC LAUREATE Dr. Paul Samuelson de-j
nounced continued federal subsidies for the supersonic transport
1yesterday as "colossal economic folly."
Other witnesses before the Senate Appropriations Committee
called the super plane a lemon, an economic albatross, and a dan-
gerous pig-in-a-poke.
Samuelson said continuing the SST project will not create more _
new jobs, may harm rather than improve the balance of payments,
and may cost the nation hundreds of millions of dollars if the demand
for the plane falls below hopes.
* * *

PRESENTS
UNIVERSALLY ACCLAIMED FRENCH CELLIST
PIERMon., Mar15,8:30
in Hill Auditorium

-Associated Press
Charges atrocity cover-up
Lt. Col. Anthony Herbert yesterday publicly accused two Army
commanders of covering up the murder and torture of Vietnamese
civilians in 1969. Herbert said that because of his efforts to
report atrocities he was called a "liar, a cheat, a crook, and
relieved of his battalion command." See News Briefs,
TROOPS 'CONGRATULATED':
*.*.
My Lai jury hears
last w,,itness report

FOURNIERR

"The Keats of the cello."
-New York Post

Tickets for Rostropovich (Choral Union Series) to be used for this replacement

TWO POLICEMEN WERE SLAIN and four students injured
yesterday in a disturbance at the University of Puerto Rico, in San
Juan.
Chancellor Pedro Jose Rivera called police to the campus to put
down a disturbance at the Student Center and the ROTC building. After
the shooting he suspended classes, giving no indication when they would
be resumed.
Reportsdon the causes of the incident, which started when several.
students allegedly smashed plates in the student cafeteria, were incom-
plete, last night.
t . 0
THE SENATE approved' an extension of the Appalachian aid
program yesterday, spurning a request by President Nixon that it
be phased out in favor of a nationwide revenue sharing plan.
Republicans vigorously denied that the 77-3 vote was a setback for
the President.
The bill provides for a four-year, $571-million extension of the Ap-,
palachian Regional Development Act of 1965. The administration had
sought a one year extension of $283 million.
PRESIDENT NIXON said yesterday that the Japanese textile
industry's program to voluntarily restrain exports to the Unitedr
States for three years "will not result in an acceptable solution"
to the United States.
The President declared he will stronglynsupport textile quota pro-
visions of legislation now pending before Congress.
Chairman Wilbur Mills of the House Ways and Means Committee
said yesterday he was surprised and disappointed at Nixon's rejection
of the Japanese industry offer.

PROGRAM:

SUITE NO. 6 IN D MAJOR .................J. S. Bach
SONATA ARPEGGIONE IN A MINOR .......... Schubert
THREE FANTASIESTUCKE, Op. 73...........Schumann
ELEGY .....................................Faure
SONATA IN A MAJOR .......................Franck

FT. BENNING, Ga. (AP')- Col.
Oran K. Henderson told Lt.
William L. Calley Jr.'s. c o u r t
martial jury in windup testi-
mony yesterday that Gen. Wil-
liam C. Westmoreland congrat-
ulated the troops that assaulted
My Lai.
T h e trial's final witness, a
brigade commander, said that a
few days after t h e operation,
Westmoreland, who was top
American commander in Viet-
nam at the time sent the partic-
ipants "a congratulatory mes-
sage for the My Lai operation."
Henderson is awaiting court
martial on charges of covering
up atrocities at My Lai. It was
a year before reports of a mass-
acre of its villagers leaked be-
yond the command level of the
participating American Divis-
ion.
Henderson said his watchword
to his commanders for the
March 16, 1968 combat sweep
through My Lai was "aggress-
iveness."
However, he testified his was

a clouded view from the top of
the operation - in a command
helicopter 1,500 feet above the
Vietnamese hamlet. He added
that'he was able to see little in
the way of detailed ground ac-
tion.
"At any time on the 16th, did
you receive any official report
from anyone concerning an in-
cident in or around a ditch at
My Lai 4," asked the court mar-
tial judge, Col. Reid W. Ken-
nedy. "I did not," replied Hen-
derson.
Henderson was the last wit-
ness in a court martial that be-
gan Nov, 12, one of three called,
at the request of the jury after
the government and the defense
rested their cases.
Calley is charged w i t h the
premeditated murder of 102 un-
resisting Vietnamese villagers
while leading an infantry pla-
toon of Charlie Company
through the hamlet on a com-
bat assault. The maximum pen-
alty upon conviction is death.I

Whitne
Young
dies at 49
LAGOS, Nigeria R) - Whit
ney M. Young Jr., executive
director of the National Urban
League w h o focused his ef-
forts in the civil rights move-
ment on getting jobs for
blacks, died yesterday while
swimming.
Young collapsed while ap-
proaching the shore after swim-
ming off Lighthouse Beach at
Tarqua Bay. Cause of death was
not immediately kn o wn, but a
heart attack was considered a
possibility.
Between 1964 and 1966 Young's
League efforts gained 40,000 new
Jobs for unemployed blacks and
8,000 better jobs for black peo-
ple.
In 1961 Young was tapped to be
executive director of the National
Urban League, a biracial social
work agency founded in 1910.
Young resented being consid-
ered a moderate in the civil
rights movement.
"We're all militants in different
ways," he contended. "I can't af-
ford the luxury of a completely
dogmatic position that says I
won't make any compromise be-
cause I'm dealing with the real
world."
"There is no such thing as a
moderate in the civil rights move-
ment," he said at another time,
"The difference is whether or not
one is all rhetoric."
"You can holler, protest, march,
picket, demonstrate, but somebody
must be able to sit in on the strat-
egy conferences and p 1 o t a
course," he said.
The black leader had been
swimming in the heavy surf with
former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark, William W. B r o o m, the
Washington bureau chief for Rid-
der Publications, and the wives of
the two men.
"Ramsey pulled him out of the
water and we gave him mouth to
mouth resuscitation," said Broom.
The League Thursday named
Harold R. Sims, its deputy execu-
tive director, as acting executive
director until a successor to Young
is appointed.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan' 420 Maynard St., Ann -Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
AA
$1.50 830
Bob White
accompanied by
David

' Bromberg
3 NITES
FRI. - SAT. - SUN.
"Bob Whites - - inging
songs that reach the deep-

TICKETS: $7.00-$6.50-$6.00-$5.00-$3.50-$2.50
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR, MICH.
(Hours: Mon. through Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat. 9 to 12. Phone 665-3717)

11

- !

ONE WEEK ONLY! PREVIEWS TUES.!
SEATS ON SALE! $1-$4.50!

Now SHOWING

ROBERT REDFORD IDICHAL J.POLLARD
UTTLE FAUSS AnD 016 HALSY e

National General Theatres

NA1NAL GENERtAL'S

STARTS
TOMORROW

i

[r FO VILLG

Fight-7-10
Doctor's Wives
7:15-9:15

37 .MAPLE RD.
69-10

7

Doctors' Wives have everything.
E kept husbands.
A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
from
Col " P1-C
Columbia Pictures -CQLORII

Jmmif
Conn ncions

I

I

- i:m m [ci a u mi : -4 F'vi 1 'L

I

1 0 MR no 8 a Iftr so a w a 8 no Wo 'm no em Ewa a- Ew wo 4w 1

I

r

I

Movement by
Julie Arenal
("Hair", 'Indians")

A provocative
new play

DIRECT FROM RINGSIDE
MUHAMAAD AL
CASSIUS CLAYX

"A ROARING VISUAL DELIGHT"
-L.A TIMES

"A REAL THRILLER"

--U1PI

I

EMNIMMEMEM

i

i ,,,

I

U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan