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March 09, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, March 9, 1 971

FHE MICHIGAN DAILY

I -

Gymnasts

sweep
By BETSY MAHON
Winning is said to be habit
forming, but the Wolverine Gym-
nastic squad has proved it ad-
dictive. Last weekend for the tenth
time in the last 11 years, it con-
quered the Big Ten.
Michigan's conquest of its con-
ference rivals began over a week
ago when it set a new NCAA re-
cord of 165.00 against Michigan
State. Wolverine gymnasts won
each of the six events and walked
away with the two top all-around
spots. This set the stage for the
championships, held in Columbus
over the past weekend.
The Wolverines managed a final
score of 161.425 in the champion-
ships to handily defeat their near-
est rivals Iowa (154.1125) and Il-
linois (154.0375). The champion-
ships began witht the compulsory'
routines, the big question mark of
the meet. Michigan scored 154.4 on!
these while their closest competi-
tor Iowa, could manage only,
143.15. Coach Newt Loken w a s
"very happy with the compul-
sories. The team did themselves
extremely proud on the compul-
sories which they had perfected
in a few months."
The Wolverines were able to
stay within the 8.0 range in all
compulsory competition and put
forth some stellar performances in
the demanding routines. Dick
Kaziny scored a fantastic 9.3 on
the side horse while teammate Ray,
Gura racked up a 9.0. Parallel bar
specialist Murray Plotkin scored a
9.0 in the compulsories for that
oes his event to lead the field.
Plotkin Michigan also controlled the
preliminary optionals held the
same night. Specialist Ward Black
scored a 9.25 on the floor evercise
optionals, which combined with
his 8.95 in the compulsories, gave
him a 9.1, good for second place.
In the vaulting event all-
arounded Ray Gura averaged a

Jig

Ten

title

8.875 to tie him with Rick Blessi of' finals while Iowa scored 156.675

Minnesota for the lead. On the
side horse Dick Kaziny scored an
average of 9.125, which secured
him the third place spot.
On the still rings specialist Mike
Sale scored 8.75 which was good
enough for a third place finish.
Murray Plotkin outdid his earlier{
performance on the parallel bars
and again led all competitors with
a 9.1. He was the only one of 36
entries in that event to score an
average of above 9.0.
In the last' event of the day,
high bar, Michigan co-captain
Rick McCurdy racked up a 9.1,

to take third place.
Co -captain Rick McCurdy
rounded out his superb Big Ten
career by winning the All-Around
Championship for the third
straight year. He scored 51.05 on
his compulsory routines and 52.40
on the optionals for a total of
103.45. Teammate Ray Gura tal-
leyed 47.65 points on his compul-
sories and 53.00 on the optionals
for 100.65 and the second p 1 a c e
finish,
Coach Loken was "elated" by
the conference title and the
chance to represent the Big Ten

which, combined with his 9.0 in in the NCAA Championships. Lok-
the compulsories, gave him the en outlined the teams objectives
first place shot. Teammate Ted for the next few weeks: "We'll
Marti combined a disappointing keep working hard to refine our
8.6 in the , compulsories with an optionals and compulsories so we
excellent 9.35 in the optionals to can be a solid NCAA contender.

take the third spot with a 8.975j
average.
In the team finals on Satur-
day, in which only Michigan,
Iowa, and Illinois competed, t h e
Wolverines scored over 27 points
in each event, won five of them
and tied the other. The Wolver-
ines took the top three finishes in1
the vaulting event as Ray G u r a
won with a 9.2 and Ted Marti and
Rusty Pierce tied for second with
9.0. Ed Howard won the high bar
competition with a 9.45 w h il e
Rick McCurdy finished second
with a 9.35.
Dick Kaziny finished third in
the side horse I finals with a score
of 9.35. Mike Sale won the rings
competition with a score of 9.35
while Monty Falb and Rick Mc-
Curdy finished tied for third. In
the parallel bar competition M"ir-
ray Plotkin finished third with a
9.1.
The Wolverines scored 163.8 it
the finals which combined w i t h
their earlier average gave them
1 161.426 points and the champion-
ship. Illinois scored 158.275 in the'

I ed like to be in the top three in
the team finals." If the gymnast's
performances in the NCAA's are
similar to the ones in the Big
Ten's they should not have a n y
trouble accomplishing their goal.
NHL Standings

Page Seven
f

Boston
New York
Montreal
Toronto
Buffalo
Detroit
Vancouver
Chicago
St. Louis
Minnesota
Philadelph
Pittsburgh
os Angelea
Aifornia

East Division
WI L . T Pts. GF GA
48 10 7 103 324 166
41 14 11 93 216 147
34 18 012 0 236 174
33 27 6 72 220 180
18 36 13 49 177 249
19 35 10 48 175 236
18 40 6 42 171 245

I

West Division
42 15 8
27 21 16
24 29 14

92 237
70 174
62 163

MURRAY PLOTKIN, Michigan's parallel bar specialist, do
thing in a recent meet at Crisler Arena. Last weekend I
emerged as Big Ten champion in the event.
Syracuse, aS al
added to NIT, fiel

ia

24
20
18
17

29
30
34
45

12
16
12
5

60
56
48
39

178
188
189
161

154
168
197
190
195
252
256

Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Gamnes
Detroit at Vancouver
Los Angeles at St. Louis
only games scheduled.

'I W

NEW YORK (P) - Hawaii, '
Georgia Tech, LaSalle, Syracuse
and St. John's of New York were
named yesterday to the National
Invitation Basketball Tournament.
bringing to 10 the number of teams
in the 16-member field.
Hawaii joins the NIT field for the
first time. Coached by former pro
Red Rocha, the Rainbows are av-
eraging 91.4 points a game this:
season with a 22-4 record.
Georgia Tech, competing for the
second straight year, has a 20-8
record and is led by 6-foot-9 Rich
Yunkus. The Yellowjackets were
beaten by St. John's in last year.
quarterfinals.
St. John's will be making its 20th
appearance in the NIT. The Red-
men, who scored their 1,000th vie
tory Saturday, boast a 17-8 mark.

They have won four NIT crowns,
1913-44-59-&69.
Syracuse, 19-6, has played in four
previous NITs. LaSalle, 20-6, will
be making its first appearance
since 1965 but its eighth over-all.
Previously named to the 34th an-
nual tourney which gets underway
March 20 were St. Bonaventure.
Dayton, Tennessee, Massachusetts
and Providence.
Daily Official Bulletin
TUESDAY, MARCH 9
Day Calenidar~
Admissions Of. Annual Community
College Counselor/Student Conferene:
Continued. on Page i0) t

BOOKS
An unusual collection of
MEDIEVAL
Literature, history, etc.
THIS WEEK ONLY
Borders Book Shop
211 S. State
668-7653
(next to Herb David Guitar)

ABORTIONS
ARE LEGAL IN NEW YORK
IMMEDIATE ADMISSION
Confidentially Arranged at
Medical Clinics and Hospitals
Performed by Board Certified
GYNECOLOGISTS
Call: 212-592-8335
Day or Night - 7 days a week
A.I.D. Referral Service
of New York

READ
-JAMES WECHSLER-
- in

. , p
r
S
',1 ' r ii yM
,

MIINREMIOUR
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looks. The coat is moderately
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legged with a bottom flare and
western pockets. Medium blue or
chocolate brown, for 36 to 44
sizes, $90.

Let's hear it for the drunks.

It's not the drink that kills, it's the drunk, the problem drinker, the abusive
drinker, the drunk driver. This year he'll be involved in the killing
of at least 25,000 people. He'll be involved in at least 800,000 highway
crashes. After all the drunk driver has done for us, what can we do for
him? If he's sick, let's help him. But first we've got to get him off the road.

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