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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


603 E. Liberty St.
DIAL 5-6290
DOORS OPEN 12:45
Shows at
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Brando tries so hard to convey as Stanley Kowalski
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-Gorman Beauchamp, Mich. Daily

i
I news briefs
By The Associated Press
AN ARMY PHYCHIATRIST described Lt. William Calley Jr.
yesterday as free of any mental impairment at My Lai three
years ago. But the defense in the trial at Ft. Benning, Ga., tossed
a new idea at a court-martial jury - that the defendant's
combattraining might have left him involuntarily "conditioned
3to kill."
"Did you find anything to indicate any impairment of Lt. Calley's
thought processes on 16 March, 1968?" asked the prosecutor, Capt.
Aubrey Daniel, referring to the date on which Calley is charged with
premeditated murder of 102 unarmed Vietnamese civilians.I
"No, I did not," replied the prosecution witness, Maj. Henry
Edwards, a government psychiatrist who pronounced Calley "perfect-
ly normal."
On cross-examination, chief defense lawyer George Latimer
said: "I ask you, major, if you believe you can pathologically con-
dition the mind along a certain channel - I'll say a channel to
kill - and leave generally untouched other areas of thinking?"
"I would not say that," replied Edwards, a slender, soft-spoken
mental expert.
THE GOVERNMENT estimated yesterday that wholesale
prices rose sharply again this month for a two-month increase
of 1.5 per cent, the biggest in 14 years.
The sharp increase puts new pressure on consumer prices, whichj
have slackened their rise lately.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics blamed the preliminary 0.8 per
cent February increase in wholesale prices mainly on bad weather
that kept hogs and cattle from getting to market, driving up volatile
wholesale farm prices 4.5 per cent.
* * *
JEWS FROM 38 nations ended a three-day congress in Brus-
sels on the plight of Soviet Jewry yesterday with a plea to the
world to help their brethren in that nation.
In their final appeal, the 760 delegates made three requests:
-Recognition of the right of Soviety Jews to emigrate to Israel.
-A chance for Soviet Jews to live and raise their children
as Jews in Russia.
-An end to "the defamation of the Jewish people and Zionism"
in the Soviet Union.
* * *
A METHOD FOR detecting the success of cancer surgery on
humans within a month's time is being developed by researchers
at the University of Tennessee.f
The usual current method of determining the success of cancer
surgery is the reappearance or non-reappearance of the diseaseI
within five years.
The University scientists, headed by microbiologist Dr. Joseph
Coggin, perfected an anal cancer test in five years of research and
now are trying a test on humans.
* * *
THE AMERICAN INDEPENDENT PARTY of Michigan holds
its state convention tomorrow in the Howell recreation center.
The party, formed to spearhead Alabama Gov. George Wallace's
1963 Presidential drive in Michigan, is expected to choose a new
chairman since James Hall of Warren says he will not seek re-election.
Rollin Smith of Battle Creek is expected to be chosen as Hall's
successor.
Hall has been a source of controversy ever since the party rolled
up 330,000 Michigan votes for Wallace. Some dissidents are threat-
ening to boycott Saturday's state convention, claiming the Detroit
area controls the party and some party leaders are influenced by the
Ku Klux Klan.

'doommomme-a
(T4 r

SitioFan

Friday, February 26, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Gov' t questions
student aid laws
WASHINGTON .P - The Federal restrictions which now
bar persons convicted of campus disruption from receiving
federal student loans and loan guarantees is currently being
questioned in government circles.
The administration calls the restriction an administrative
nightmare. "It assumes there's a good list and a bad list, and.
any student who gets on the bad list, the computer says
'bingo' and he doesn't get anything," said a White House
aide. "But there's no list." -

43-tiy

"The most revealing
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P4ITH POr"Jm
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-Associated Press
AilpOii OppOSillon gr olded
Riot policemen, background, drag out radical students who lie on
ground yesterday during the fourth day of a land expropriation
program at the Tokyo International Airport construction site.
Police said 49 students were arrested for obstructing police duties.
CONFESSION CASE:
j
Court ruling rawUs
mixed assessments
WASHINGTON (A) - Law enforcement officials are divided on ho
much easier it will be 'to gain convictions under the Supreme Cour
newly loosened confession rule.
"Very helpful," said one official. Of limited use, said others. T
varying assessments surfaced in an Associated Press spot check
reaction to the court's later interpretation of its landmark 1966 Miran
v. Arizona ruling.
In that case the court said confessions could not be used again
a defendant if obtained without telling him in advance he could rema
silent and have a lawyer.

t The chief congressional advocate
of the restriction said, how.-ver,
that he'll fight to keep it in new
appropriation bills.
Rep. Neal Smith (D-Iowa), also
said he plans to quiz officials from
the Department of Health. Educa-
tion and Welfare at appropriations
hearings next month on how well1
they're enforcing the restriction,
which first went into effect three
years ago.
In his higher education message
Monday. President Nixon proposed
expansion of federal aid to an ad-
ditional one million low income
college students.
The administration attempt to
eliminate the campus disruption
provision was not trumpeted as
part of that message, however.
It shows up only in the form of
telltale brackets around the exist-
ing language as spelled out in the
telephone-book-sized appendix to
the federal budget released by the
White House Jan. 29.
The existing language: "No part
of the funds appropriated under
this act shall be used to provide a
loan, guarantee of a loan or a grant
w to any applicant who has been con-
L's victed by any court of general
jurisdiction of any crime which in-
he volves the use of or the assistance
of to others in the use of force, tres-
da pass or the seizure of property un-
der control of an institution of
higher education to prevent offic-
ast ials or students at such an institu-
tin tion from engaging in their= duties
or pursuing their studies."

Congress
hiears spy
testhon
WASHINGTON (YP) - Congress
was told yesterday that the mili-
tary's domestic surveillance often
is a case of spy vs. spy, like the
time 53 agents watched one another
among 66 civilian demonstrators.
Even the Navy was said to have
sent two intelligence experts from
"somewhere on the West Coast" to
infiltrate the peaceful, mid-Sep-
tember 1969 antiwar gathering out-
side Ft. Carson, Colo., an Army
installation.
That account and other such ex-
amples were advanced to the Sen-
ate subcommittee on constitutional
rights by Lawrence Lane, former
intelligence coordinator at the post
and now an aide to Rep. Robert
Giaimo, (D-Conn.).
Under questioning by Chairman
Sam Ervin Jr., (D-N.C.), Lane de-
clared, "Rivalry between various
military intelligence groups was so
great the agents were watching
each other to determine what the
others were watching so we could
see what was important."
Lane, who was assigned to the
5th Military Intelligence Detach-
ment at Ft. Carson, said he once
found himself named on another's
report as a "dissident soldier" be-
cause he was spotted attending a
civilian antiwar meeting. Lane said
he was there on surveillance duty
himself.
Lane, like several other former
agents, testified that he and his
colleagues maintained extensive
files on civilian groups and mdi-
viduals.
In one case, he said, his unit was
to monitor a "symposium on vio-
lence" at Colorado College, and
ordered dossiers on the scheduled
speakers from Ft. Holabird, Md.
He said the intelligence back-
ground received from Ft. Holabird
on civil rights activist Dick Greg-
ory "was so tainted that is was un-
usable." It was completely subjec-
tive, based on unsubstantiated in-
formation and unreliable sources,"
he said.
Lane said that, typically, at-
tempts were made to link indi-
viduals to Communist organiza-
tions through a process of guilt by
association."

Andy;
Warhol fri., so
presents sat. before
Joe all oche
Dallesandro
in
Introducing Jane Forth and Holly Woodlawn directed by P aulio ,

t. eve.-$2.50
6:00 p.m.-$1.75
r times-$2.00

No
one
under
18
mttted

FR I.
3, 5,
7 9, 1

Wednesday the court, with Presi-
dent Nixon's two appointees tip-
ping the balance, ruled 5-4 that
such illegally obtained confessions
could be used to discredit a de-
fendant's testimony if he takes the
stand.
Calofirnia Asst. Atty. Gen. Al-
bert Harris said the ruling would
not help in proving a case directly.
"but it certainly would help in

..

HEW sets women's
advocacy branch office

trial to keep the defendant from
coming up with a fabricated story."
Michigan Supreme Court Justice
Thomas Brennan agreed. "You're
only checking his veracity." he
said.

WASHINGTON (P) - T h e
Women's Liberation movement
gained a new foothold in the fed-
eral government yesterday when
the Department of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare set in motion an
advocacy branch for its female
employes.
HEW Secretary Elliot Richard-
son announced he will establish a
Women's Action Program t h at
will insure equal hiring and pro-
motion for the department's 62,000
female employes.
The program will also promote
F day care centers, flexible hours

partment, we have tended to apply
a double standard in judging their
performance and have sometimes
required that they be superior to
their male counterparts in order to
be elevated to positions of author-
ity," Richardson said in a recent
memorandum.
The Secretary said the program
will insure that the department's
agencies consider women for all
job vacancies and will help re-
solve "day-to-day problems t h a t
make recognition and advance-
ment difficult for women."
Government officials said t h e
' rogram is the first advocacy of-

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Indianapolis police legal adviser
Roy Jones said the new ruling will
have limited effect for police. "It's
now routine to give the v. arning
and we would get an unusable con-
fession only when somebody, not
being interrogated as a suspect,
blurted out something incrinhimt-'
ing. Then, if he took the stand tAter
other police work had made a case,
what he said could be useful."

and liberal maternity leaves for
employes, according to the new fice established and financed by
directress. Xandra Kayden. any Cabinet-level department in
"Dcspite the enormous contri- response to demands by Womens
butions made by women to this de- Liberation.

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