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February 23, 1971 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-23

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F, ge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 23.

197#

PageTenTHE ICHGAN AIL

Tu.sd. February.., 21194 T ..

I

PRESS SIX DEMANDS:
Protesters sit-in at LSA Bldg.

(Continued from Page 1)

It was unclear whether the jani-

of a single University function- tors were disrupted last night.
the efforts of the LSA B 1 d g . The sit-in, which began at noon
janitors to clean the building. yesterday, is a continuation-of a
There was a brief scuffle when three hour sit-in at the LSA Bldg.
a security guard and a janitor re- on Friday to protest the arrests
fused entrance to a student at the of two students and support six
side door, but another guard in- demands formulated earlier this
formed the first of the University's month.
apparent decisions to let the de- The two students were members
monstrators remain as long as of a group of demonstrators who
they did not become disruptive. attempted to enter the Regents'
There were no further problems. monthly public session on Friday
morning in order to present the

* ~-Daily-Tam Gottlieb
Prof. Ann Scott speaks in Aud. A
Scott says historians

0

4

ignore women

's role

By DEBBI1 THAL
"Male historians see what their
presumptions lead them to see, and
they expect women to blend into
the scenery," says Dr. Ann Scott,
a history professor at Duke Uni-
versity who addressed over 200
people yesterday.
The last lecturer in a series of
talks on "Crisis in American
Values," Scott ran down a brief
history of women in America, cit-
.Pro f. leaves
commission
History Prof. William Freehling
has resigned from the University's
Commission on Women.
He said his heavy teaching lpad
did not leave ample time for his
commission work.
Freehling added that although
it is "too early" to determine the
effectiveness of the commission, lie
does not "think it is going any-
where."
Freehling was one of two men
on the commission, established last
month to review the University's
affirmative action plan for equal
employment of women and to ex-
amine general University policies
which may discriminate against
women.
The affirmative action plan was
submitted last month to the De-
partment of Health, Education
and Welfare after that agency
threatened to withhold from the
University all federal contracts.

ing what she saw as the differ-
ences between common belief and
fact.
"It is important for women to
know something about their his-
tory in order to have some self-
respect. American women are op-
erating as if they had no history,"
Scott saiq.
She then cited many women, ig-
nored in most history books, who
accomplished remarkable deeds.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and
Lucy Stone, leading suffragettes;
Dr. Antoinette Brown, the first
female minister of the gopsel and
a medical doctor; Elizabeth Black-
well who fought bitterly to be the
first woman to be admitted to an
American medical school and
graduated at the head of her
class; and Mary Lyons, founder of
Mt. Holyoke College; all of these
women have been ignored, accord-
ing to Scott.
In a brief discussion of Woman's
Liberation, Scott credited the or-
ganization with having "done a
world of good especially making
people think.
"Some obstacles are giving way
partly due to Woman's Liberation,"
she adds. "Even Harvard, the last
refuge of the male ego, is finally
coming around and letting more
women than ever into their gov-
ernment."
Concluding her talk, Scott call-
ed on women to "dare to exercise
powers outside the defined limits.
"To take advantage of new op-
portunities and gain their rights,
women will have to be prepared.
It is now essential for women to
get a skill and take the initiative,"

Nixon asks
school aid
WASHINGTON (P)- President
Nixon yesterday renewed his re-
quest for a $644 million expansion
of a college-student aid program
which would provide federal edu-
cation subsidies to an additional
million low-income students.
Repeating his commitment that
"no qualified student who wants to
go to college should be barred by
lack of money," Nixon told Con-
gress that the program "would
assure that federal funds go first,
and in largest amounts, to the
neediest students in order to place
them on an equal footing with stu-
dents from higher income fami-
lies."
Students from families making
over $15,000 are five times more
likely to attend college than young
people, whose families earn less
than $3,000, he said.
Congress killed a virtually ident-
ical administration plan last year,
largely because at least 300.000
middle-income s t u d e n t s would
have lost eligibility for interest
subsidy loans.
Nixon's proposals again failed to
meet the request of higher educa-
tion organizations for direct gov-
ernment aid 'to colleges and uni-
versities.
But Nixon did renew his un-
successful request of last year for
a National Foundation for Higher
Education within the government
to finance education and explore
methods for direct federal aid to
institutions. The budget request
for this foundation, however, was
$100 million compared to $200 mil-
lion requested in 1970.
The President also said that
special help is needed for pre-
dominately black colleges and uni-
versities. He offered them no new
programs but said that special
provisions were made for them in
his proposals, such as a priority
place in the National Foundation
for Higher Education.
Under Nixon's student aid pro-
posal, the eligibility maximum
would be $10,000-a-yearutaxable
income for a family of four.
Maximum government aid would
be $1,400 a year per student
through a mix of grants, work-
study payments, and subsidized
loans, except for students attend-
ing high cost colleges who could
receive an additional $1,500 a year
in subsidized loans.

six demands.
The demands, formulated after
a march against the invasion of
Laos two weeks ago, are that the
University abolish ROTC, end re-
cruiting by companies that dis-
criminate, stop all war research,
create a 24-hour child care center,
grant student control of Course
Mart, and let the anti-war move-
ment use University facilities.
Friday's regental hearing, held
in the Administration Bldg., was
closed to all but those who had
obtained permission beforehand..
Skirmishing between demonstra-
tors and Ann Arbor police broke
out when demonstrators tried to
forcibly enter the building.
The demonstrators in the LSA
Bldg. are supporting the demands,
while protesting the expansion of'
the Indochina war, Friday's
arrests, and the lack of student
participation in University deci-
sion making.
When the group first convened
in the LSA Bldg. at noon, the 100
people present considered pro-{
posals ranging from moving to the
Administration Bldg. to concen-
trating efforts in support of the
people's peace treaty for Vietnam
recently ratified here at a national
youth and student anti-war con-
vention.
The demonstrators also voted to
oppose "disruptive, destructive, or
other violent types of action" dl-
ing the sit-in.
The demonstrators held a dis-
cussion of the six demands and the
sit-in tactic, then decided to or-
ganize a mass meeting for later
in the afternoon.
The crowd dropped to 50 during
TFs petition
on .plan
Several dozen teaching fellows
met last night in the East Quad
to map action against a proposal
by Vice President for Academic
Affairs Allen Smith which would
standardize the definition of grad-
uate assistant.
The teaching fellows claim the
plan wouldreducestheir health
insurance benefits as well as the
time they are allowed to hold ap-
pointments.
Mainly from the literary college,
the teaching fellows will soon cir-
culate a petition against the pro-
posal.
"We are not only opposed to
Smith's program, but also the co-
vert and secret means with which
it has been proposed," says a
statement by the teaching fellows.
The proposal by Smith lists the
duties and fringe benefits for all
graduate assistants. University of-
ficials say the plan merely lists
existing practices and puts them
into writing.
WOMEN Q
against Imperialism c
Plans to be made for talking
with women in community about
war and women's needs.
Strauss Lounge f
E. Quad
0 Wed., Feb. 24, 7:30 p.m.
">0"""""> <""""" > oc""" =<"">o<""""">

( the afternoon, and most 1eople
held small group discussions, play-
ed cards, sang or studied.
At 4:30 p.m., the announced
time of the mass meeting, there
were over 150 participants, the
largest crowd of the day.
They voted to "stay until the
demands are met," but did not
exclude a last-minute decision if
threatened with arrest.
At 6 p.m., closing time for the
LSA Bldg., the front andback
doors were locked by security
guards and students could enter
and exit only through the side
door.
By dinnertime, the group had
diminished to about 50 persons,
and remained close to that size
throughout the night.
Small groups discussed the poli-
tics of the action and some went
out to bring back food.
At 9:30 p.m. the group o n c e
again met to discuss the future of
the demonstration, and decided
unanimously to remain through
the night and try to broaden sup-
port today. At this afternoon's mass
meeting, participants will decide
on further action.
Possible University recourse
against the demonstrators could
follow that taken during the 1969
student bookstore sit-in. At that
time, administrators secured an
injunction against demonstratoors
inside the LSA Bldg. citing their
'disruption" of the normal opera-
tions of the University. Subse-
quently, the building was cleared
and 107 protestors were arrested.

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JACK GARRIS-Republican Party
ROBERT HARRIS-Democratic Party
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she says.

- ' " "{f" iS'f :.:.J$'1':+'.'"':.:a"''..''\ munications for consideration at this Approved: That SGC allocate up to
meeting must be in the President's $75 to othe ad hoc Committee to Pro-
DAILY OFFICIAL hands by March 4. test the Invasion of Laoos. Roll Call
* * * * Voote: YES: De Grieck, Heyn, Les-
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN BY sem, Schenk, Spears, Teich, NO: Lewin,
BULLETIN STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL Oesterle, Thee. PASS: Hunt.
AT ITS MEETING FEBRUARYC 7,i mDefeated: That SGCsuspend all pay-
S.... ~ Resgnaion f Concilmenu~ of funds to ad hoc Committee
TUSAFBUR 3 member, Al Ackerman. to protest the Invasion -of Laoos.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Accepted: Student Consumer Uniontp
Food and Drug Survey. Approved: That SGC allocate $25 to
ay C ena rDeefated: That SGC request that the the people working on the A&P boy-
Board in Control of the Student Book- aott to be used for leafleting,
ySophoomares iteretr nHistory store reconsider their decision regard- Approved: That LS&A Student Goy-
as your field of concentration: In- ing the granting of a concession to c ment hold its winter, 1971 elections
fomtinMetn,.Ad.D ngl HlIndian's Paintbrush; and concurrent with the SGC election pro-
4 pomg .That SGC request theBoard to term- vided (1) the ballots are separate, and
Statistics Seminar: Dr. P Rocckwell inate and such agreements between the kept separate, (2) responsibility for
MSU, "A Storage Model with Depend- Board and Indian's Paintbrush, financing, counting,eand certifying the
ent Inputs," 2407 Mason Hall, 4 p.m. Approved: That Bob Nelson serve as election as conducted by the school,
Astronomy Colloquium: D. Gottlieb, Elections Directoor in the coming SGc and (3) the school submits a plan to
U. oof Md. "Supermetallicity in K Election, andsthat he be paid $100 the C & R Board for joiontly running
Gat,80P& Blg,4pmfor his services, the polls, and C & R approves the plan
nglishd Dpt. and Extension S ce Tt rnie eyn serveT aAssistant no later than 3 days before the last
glstuDentpts, asdErtesofpSerc:Elections Director; adTa h eregularly scheduled Council meeting
readings, UGLI Multi-Purpoose Rm., paid $50 for her services before the election.
4:10 p.m. Approved: That Free Angela Davis Appointed: Jay Hack and Ball Kand-
Physics Seminar: T. Yan, Cornell, Committee be recognized as a student ler to fill the two vacancies on Stu-
"Partoon Models," P&A Colloq. Rm., organization. dn oenetCucl
4:15 p.m. Approved: That SGC assign the four
Philosophy Lecture: R. Brandt, "In- ,}large rooms in the Michigan Union forP
terpersoonal Comparisoon ofo Utility," the following urposes: 1. LS&A Student
E. Conf. Rm., Rackham, 8 p.m. Government; 2. Central Student Judic- EDUCATION DIVISION
School of Music: E. Mosher-Kraus, iarry; 3. Black Student Union; 4. Meet- Recruiters from following s c h o o I s
soprane; E. Bossart, piano, Rackham ing and special projects. a will be here week of Mar. 8; make
Lecture Hall, 8 pm. Approved: Office space allocation in
Sceh. of Music: Tuba and Euphonium the Student Activities Building. appts.startintMon., Feb. 22, because
Student Recital, Sch. of Music Recital Accepted: A letter to be sent to the March 8: Flint Mi. (Kearsley Schls),
Hall, 8 p.m. Michigan Daily requesting that their
International Students Assooc.: Slid- business staff take positive action he Hge, Net krIand,;ar 9:d.,
es on Niger, 1024 Hill, 9:30 p.m. against sexism and racism in all ad- West Bend, Wisc., Utica, Mi., Janes-
.__rAppointed: That John Koza, Marty ville, Wisc.; March 10: Lake Forest, Ill.,
General N otxce~s Scott and Dale Oesterle serve on the LanGrange s Il(Lyons Twp. HS.),
Central Student Judiciary Interview- G .
All Students in School of Educationo ins committee. ren, Mi., (Van Dyke P.S.), Inkster,
(undergrad): Preclassification for Fall If Johhn Koza cannot serve on the ig (Cahrry ill chhs) ,La-
and Spring-Summer Terms, 1971 will committee the other two members will hsing athi arochal Scht),
start Mar. 8 and will run four weeks; be empowered to find another grad- chanan i.Dearborn hg Wt
material may be obtained in rm. 2000 uate, non-Student Government Coun- b,.), St Joseph, Mi., Benton Haram d
SEB; early registration for Fall Term cil member to serve. Id.; March 12: Greenville, Mi.
will be Anr 12-23; students who ad----- - In.Mrh2Gevil'i

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vance classify and do not early register
will lose reserve places and much class-
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Regents' Meeting: March 19. Coin-
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