100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 9, 1971

-Associated Press
Ghostly gallery
Two pickets parade outside the Federal Communications Commission Building in Washington yester-
day, protesting a hearing between the FCC and members of the tobacco industry. Commercials ad-
vertising cigarettes have been banned from television since Jan. 2.
HIGHER SALARIES SOUGHT:
'U' profs discuss unionization;
AAU to poll £aculty next week

Pinball
lourishes '
d
in dorms
(Continued from Page 1)
nearly went bankrupt last year. It t
has about $6000 this year, how-
ever, and he attributes the finan-
cial success to the popularity of
pinball.
Campbell explains that intakex
from the machines varies from
$25 during a poor week to $500 !
during a very good week.
The machines have attracted
high school students from the
community as well as university;
people. At East Quad, two high'
school juniors explain they find
the atmosphere there "friendly."
They claim they were asked to
leave at the Law Quad and South
Quad.
A problem cited by many stu-
dents is the compelling nature of -Associated Press
the game. Tel
"It's addictive, sore of like Aviv talks
bridge, the more you play the Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir listens as UN envoy Gunnar
more you want to play," says Sally Jarring talks during a meeting yesterday in Tel Aviv. The two
Sutton, '73. One Residential Col-,
s al were discussing the resumption of Middle East peace talks.
lege freshman explains, "I'm -_
avoiding it because I might get
hooked." SHERIFF'S SPY SQUAD:
A literary college sophomore de- S
scribes the common plight, "I used
to play very often in the begin-
nith r t et tails of plan not
ni g o h e r u e a osee th at I'd n ever be able to stop i e t i p " h a s
if I kept it up," he says.
"My grades started going down told to police chiefs
money," he continues. "Now I
don't even go on that side of the
building any more. It's just too (Continued from Page 1) In other developments yesterday,
tempting." S p e a k i n g in the absence of student senators at EMU launched
A group of South Quad players Sheriff Harvey, Undersheriff Har- a drive against the sheriff's pro-
seem deadly serious in their game old Owings, who would be in posed squad. The student leaders
techniques. They indignantly note charge of the proposed squad, said say they will ask. Gov. William
Milliken's o f fi ce to investigate
that the quad's council members yesterday, "they were all informed
use the master key to play free that the s q u a d would be tri- Press alleging that undercover
games, irritating the "regular county"Pes legt k a ndrovrt
players." He said the statement m a d e agents work on campus.
Robert Wood, '73, says he likes against the squad by University Attempts are also to be made to
to play in South Quad because President Robben Fleming wa Sponberg to make a public state-
everyone there appreciates the "politically motivated crap. ment against the squad, similar to
game for what it is. Fleming has stated his opposi- that made by Fleming at the Uni-
"It's not luck. It's a game of tion to Harvey's proposal. versity.
skill, just like the sign says. At In yesterday's Ann Arbor News, At the University, Student Gov-
Bursley," he adds, "there's a dif- Harvey responded to Fleming's op- ernment Council has launched a
ferent class of players. They laugh position. campaign against the proposed
and joke and don't take it ser- "If they had done some research squad.'
iously." at the University and not relied
A player at "Gottlieb's Groovy: on the Michigan Daily they would
A Game of Skill", which seems to know that our goal is to combat
be thermost populars machie illicithdrugs and narcotics through-
evrwee usu i ecinout the area," he was quoted. Men's Wg, Mustaches
to the new toys: "Dorm life is The grant application for the Synthetic or Human H
much better now," he says. "Be- squad states, however, that one
tween the dope and the pinballs, purpose for which funds would be and Braids
what more could anyone want?" used is to "provide adequate and
r_ _ __ _appropriate information for deal- 48 Hour Styli
ing with campus unrest."
Albert H. M a r c k w a r d t, an Owings reiterated Harvey's pre-
alumnus and former English pro- vious accusation that the Detroit THE, LA VIV
fessor, has won the 1970 David Free Press had misquoted the
H. Russell Award for Distinguish- sheriff as saying he had under- 109 E. Liberty
ed Research in the Teaching of cover men on the campuses of the
English, given annually by the University and EMU.
National Council of Teachers of Harvey, who was reported to be
English. in Lansing and was unavailable
Marckwardt, who now teaches for comment, has admitted he has
at Princeton University, received "informants" on both campuses,
t all his degrees from the University however. The Thursday Ann Ar-
and spent 35 years on its faculty. bor News quoted him as saying,
He is former director of the Eng- "What is police work anyway if Y o u
lish Languaae Institute, it's not spying?"S

Suit filed in
Kent incident

(Continued from Page 1)

off"cal publication of the Univer-
for $2 m il 1i o n each; John R. sity of Michigan. Notices should be
Cleary, 20, of Scotia, N.Y., and sent in TYPEWRITTEN fo r m to
Thomas M. Grace, 20, of Syra- Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
Buse, N.Y., $2,050 000 each; and 2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
cus, lcation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Alan M. Confora, 21, of Barber- Saturday and Sunday. Items ap.
ton, $1,050,000. pear only once. Student organiza-
Ition notices are not accepted for
Filed earlier was a $4 million publication. For more information,
suit by Mrs. Bernard Miller in the phone 764-9270.
death of her son, Jeffrey G. Mil-
ler, 20, of New York City, a $6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 9
million suit by Arthur Krause in
the death of his daughter, Allison,
19, of Pittsburgh, and a $1 mil- 3200 SAB
lion suit by Mrs. Martin Scheuer WUJS Inst. for Hebrew and Jewish
in the death of her daughter, San- studies, Arad, Israel, offers one year
dra L. Scheuer, 20, of Youngstown, prog. to univ. grads interested in living
and working in Israel. Also have e
'All of the suits claimed the vice- proposed a trip through Africa this
tim's constitutional rights were summer; more details at Career Plan-
filaedt harkedth odes r'withwning.
violate, $hvanderbilt Univ., announces opening
ordering the guard to the campus of Graduate School of Management this
unnecessarily, and said the Na- fall.
tional Guard officer was reckless Weymouth Kirkland Foundation, Law
in ordering inadequately trained Schola.rship, dea.dline, March 24, 1971.
Full tuition for the academic year in
men to carry live ammunition and the Chicago and law school of stu-
failed to keep the troops from dent's choice plus allowance of up to
firing.i$1000; scholarships available.
Tobe-Coburn School for Fasion Ca
Friday's suits also charged White reers, Ltd., has up to four full-tuition
with failing to take any actions to Fashion Fellowships for senior women
Cotrolguardnalyctnsidies.graduating before August 31.171; dead-
c l a iline Jan. 24. 1971.
Industry's New talent recruiting org.
(INTRO), holding 14th annual conf. In
P Chicago, March 18 & 19. Registration
deadline, Feb. 1, 1971; over 100 compan-
availabl adt Cadeer1Planning.
law reform SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE-
212 SAB (lower level)
(Continued from Page 1) Interview:
Tuesday, Jan. 12. Cutco Division 'of
ians overseas could be tried in Wear-Ever Aluminum will interview at
Federal courts; and 1:30 and 3:00 p.m. at BPS; register by
-Federal jurisdiction would beaoe or in person; full and part-time
broadened to include many crimes Announcement: N.J. Dept. of Corn-
traditionally considered local mat- munity Affairs have announced Sum-
mer Intern Frog. Details and applies-
ters, such as burglary, murder, and tions at SPS, 212 SAD. Application dead-
sexual offenses. The offenses would line Apri1 1, except law students, Feb.
be federal crimes under certain Is.

t.'

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an

(Continued from Page 1)
to increase its role in "financial
and organizational policies" at the
University.
According to the proposal, the
committee would look into ways of
altering the existing faculty gov-
ernment to accomplish this, but
would also investigate "whether
an even more effective participa-
tion in governance . . . might be
attained through the formation of
a unit affiliated with a state or
national organization."
SACUA, the executive committee
of Senate Assembly, has endorsed
the proposal, and Assembly will
consider it at their meeting
Jan. 18.

I
1 C
.
, L
pp r
r
r
l
a
1
1
C
a
T
fi
1

of the faculty in the governance
of the University.
Currently, the faculty's author-
ity resides mainly in the individ-
ual schools, colleges, and depart-
ments within the University.
There, they have general purview
over academic matters, and the
allocation of funds granted to
their academic unit.
Faculty input into the decisions
of the University administration
is channeled. primarily through
Senate Assembly and SACUA.
However, neither group has taken
much of a role in decisions con-
cerning salary increases.
The size of the annual increase
depends in part on how much
additional funds are obtained by
the University each year-mostly
through increases in the state ap-
propriation, and tuition fees. The
executive officers, with the con-
currence of' the Regents, decide
how much of the increases should
go to each academic unit, which
in turn determines how much of
its' additional funds should be
used for increasing the salaries
of its faculty. But since almost all
of the money used by the indi-
vidual academic units pays for
salaries, the annual increase they
receive from the administration
virtually determines how much
they can increase salaries.
With this in mind, many dis-
satisfied faculty members feel the

administration has not allocatedI
enough of the University's new
funds each year to the academic
units, placing a higher priority on
other programs, such as financial
aid.
"A year ago faculty salaries
were one of the first priorities,"
says Rehmus. "Now the faculty
ends up taking what's left. Why
shouldn't we come a little higher
on the priority list?"
Currently, the AAUP submits to
the administration an annual Re-
port on the Economic Status of
the Faculty, a collection of data
on faculty salaries, at other in-
stitutions comparable to the Uni-
versity, and on the cost-of-living
increases.
The recommendations of reports
such as this represent the major
current input of the faculty in
determining salary increases, a
type of input which Rehmus says
has been called "organized beg-
<ing" by other teacher organiza-
tions.
If the faculty did unionize, what
would be the result?
In the short run, the faculty
might better its financial position
through collective bargaining. But
the contract that would result
from the bargaining would un-
doubtedly contain stipulations that
the faculty would be unhappy
with, in return for the salary
boost.

i
t

circumstances, as when committed
by a person who crossed a state
line.
The commission went into oper-
ation three and a half years ago,
created by Congress to recommend
changes in the penal code. Its
members included lawyers a n d
judges as well as congressmen..
The sweeping nature of the pan-
el's findings may stand in the way
of their quick adoption, some
members indicated.

".:}".-.:"'""titi$ r,,wn..:: n+ n itti4f' h fi 'S'n :ti : r,?'ti-1i
,ti:":":"}.: tid,:>.^+.'. t.":tirR+ThL*'r ti ',', :}: }:'k lw :vt"'.' ,". . '+ ' ..a ;sL

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
SWright
STads
Sebring
FCHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty:

and Gotees, and
-air Wigs, Wigle

Nevertheless, Eggertsen a n d
other interested faculty memberst
express skepticism about the fac-
ulty's receptiveness toward out-1
right unionization, at least for the
present.
"As a rough estimate, I'd say
that 20 per cent of the faculty
would support the idea right now,"
says political science Prof. Char-
les Rehmus, co-director of the In-
stitute for Labor and Industrialt
Relations and an authority on
unionization of teachers and other,
professionals.
Rehmus points out that union-
ization of teachers inevitably1
strikes at the teacher's self-image
as a "professional," for it makes;
him just another part of the labor
force.
"Teachers have only unionized
when they felt that the only way'
to receive the emolumernts of pro-
fessionalism was through union-
ization, or when it appeared that
they could only become profes-
sionals if they organized," Reh-
mus says.
He points out that while the
salary situation is declining, the
University is still rated relatively
high among the nation's four-year
colleges in its salary scales.
And aside from salaries, Reh-
mus .believes that the faculty,
members are generally content
with the way the University has
met the other requirements of
their "professionalism "-adequate
working conditions, the freedom
to pursue their fields of speciali-
zation, and adequate involvement
A'{

J Ladies
ts, Falls
}
ON
761-0642

'1

ng and Cutting

A WIG SAL

::4:-{}..,: "K{"Y":;}:; o .,."x "."."a.": ry ..}".v 9 !. .,.;.vr,:{ry ". ,w, " },. e ;ye"} r,"r
...:":"'f";~:":"iX4:":{".{:{ 'ry?:Y. :"r;{' T}:1Y."2! '7:':7{{::.{v: .Ki': :' .{MT'W71.'Lr." f

as Una i+w ap u. a-pv +. u..w .+.+.. .

_ __ _ __ _ ____
-- -- - -

_

Im

i~

r
I
t

COI

say you're feelin'
d and lonely?

WORSHIP

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Dr Hoover Rupert Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m.-Family Worship-"The Church
at Work in the World."
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Rupert: "How
Big Is Your World?"
Broadcast WNRZ 103 fm, WNRS 1290 am,
11:00 and 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Jan. 10:
5:30 p.m. - Celebration in the Wesley
Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Supper in the Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge.
Fridav, Jan. 15:
6:00 p.m.-Youna Marrieds dinner and folk
dancing in social hall.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Service.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-
"Religion Without Wrappings," Rev. Terry
N. Smith.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You." Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday. 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.

Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.,
Worship Services at 9:00 and'
Church School at 9:00 a.m.

R.
11

E. Simonson
:00 a.m.

Thi8

Il

THE
GOLDEN
RING
with ED TRICKETT
PENNY TRICKETT
GEORGE & GERRY
ARMSTRONG

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Sermon by
Mr. Drew.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-"God forbid we should ever be
twenty years without a rebellion."-T.J.
UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, PastorI
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran

Cheer UPI
Come on up to the 2nd floor of the Student
Publications Bldg. We'll give you warmth, under-
standing and a chance to explore the world of
publishing.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.

m

!,,

i

I

II

I

ii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan