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February 21, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-21

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 21, 1971

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, February 21, 19'~

LETTUCE BOYCOTT:

AAFFW pickets
local Krogers

Regent's decision on recruiting
receives wi despread criticism

TFs protest proposal by Smith

(Continued from Page
meeting for continued
ment of the OSS policy.

1)
enforce-

"By vetoing the oSS policy,"!
By JANET FREY he said, "the Regents are trying
All four Krogers stores in the Ann Arbor area were pick- to take away the power they
Alldourterogersystroresuthemselves gave to the OSS board
eted yesterday by a group supporting the United Farm Work- last summer."
ers Organizing Committee (UFWOC) and the lettuce boy- Policy board members Marcia
cott. Abramson also opposed the Re-

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Both De Grieck and Abramson Director John Young voiced dis-
asserted that the regental ruling approval of the Regents action
was "not contradictory to t h e for a different reason. "I'm still
OSS policy. not convinced this policy isn't an
"The board," Abramson explain- infringement of civil liberties," he
ed, "could still interpret the pol- explained.
icy in terms that once you a r e "To be sure", Young said, "a
hired by a corporation, you could moral issue of discrimination is
b- shifted to a subsidiary operat- involved, but since it is in a dif-
i. g under racist laws. Thus the ferent nation, it is a political
corporation would be recruiting matter as to how to combat that
you to work in a racist country evil. For the University to take a
and would be barred under the re- stand on this political issue is the
gental ruling." same as banning a speaker for his
Engineering Placement Service politics."

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The picketers, members of the Ann Arbor Friends of the
Farm Workers (AAFFW), handed out leaflets and urged
shoppers not to shop at Krogers because the store stocks pri-
marily non-UFWOC lettuce. Shoppers were encouraged to do
their' shopping at Great Scott, which they claim is the only
food chain in Ann Arbor which stocks only UFWOC lettuce.
The group apparently experienced no opposition except

gents actions.
"If the OSS policy board does
not reaffirm its policy, then the
students should continue to sup-
port the policy anyway," she said.

for one incident at the Packa
13
A&P lays
off seven;
boycott on
(Continued from Page 1)
sons who wish to avoid the A&P.1
Yesterday's picketing appeared
less intense than it had been when)
the boycott began, with only one
leafletter outside the Huron St.
store. A boycott organizer ex-
plained that picketers were also
present at two other local A&P
units, on Stadium and on Ply-
mouth. In addition, he said, many
would-be picketers were "busy{
driving persons to alternate shop-
ping areas."
Yesterday's activities outside the
A&P's succeeded again in dissuad-
ing "roughly half" the prospective
customers from entering the store,
according to a picketer.
When the boycott activities be-
gan last week, the protest was
more active, with persons enter-
ing the store, filling up shopping
carts and then abandoning them.
Student Government Council last
week endorsed the A&P boycott,
citing the suspensions along with
general A&P policies which it
found objectionable. SGC charged
A&P markets lettuce which is not
picked by the United Farm Work-
ers Organizing Committee mem-
bers.
A nationwide boycott of all A&P
grocery units has been requested
by the Southern ChristianLeader-
ship Conference (SCLC).
In a statement .released last
Tuesday, SCLC charged A&P with
racism in hiring and promotions.

ard Rd. store when an assist-
ant-manager called the po-
lice.
However, since the AAFFW
picketers were not infringing on
the rights of any customers, no
action was taken against them.
In addition to carrying signs and
explaining their position to inter-
ested customers, the picketers
handed out information sheets as
well as typed copies of a state-
ment in support of the UFWOC,
which customers were told to give
to cashiers or the store manager.
The immediate effect of the pic-
keting seemed moderate, at least
in part because many customers
were not familiar with the issues
involved in the boycott. As one pic-
keter said, the "main effort was in
making people aware" of the situ-
ation and the boycott. Where pros-
pective customers were already
aware of the situation, however,
the efforts of the picketers were
more effective.
At Arborland, an AAFFW mem-
ber estimated that as many as Six-
ty or seventy customers either left
without doing their marketing or,
said that they would not be coming
to Krogers after this week.
Store officials generally would
not comment on the picketers or
the Kroger policy on purchase of
lettuce.
At Arborland the produce mnana-
ger would only say that "I have no
control" as to what brand of let-
tuce the store buys. An assistant
manager of the Krogers on Pack-
ard would make no statement on
the situation, claiming that any in-
formation would have to come from
headquarters in Livonia.
Bernardo Eureste and Ruben
Zamorano, graduate students in
social work and leaders of the
AAFFW boycott group, said that
in talking to the Livonia officials
earlier this week they were told
that the nationwide food chain
would take no position in this mat-
ter.

Hill Aud. houses haven for
Selectronic music makers

(Continued from Page 1)
University studio. The music
school sponsors contemporary di-
rections concertssandcomposer's
forums where this music is pre-
sented.
Most of the students that work in
the studio feel that it is a good fa-
cility though it might lack a few
things which would make it much
more flexible.
The studio, built just before
Robert A. Moog revolutionized
electronic music, works primarily
with magnetic recording tape. This
gives the composer an exact con-
trol over his music, but also re-
quires that "a minute of music
takes several weeks of hard work
and splicing to produce," accord-
ing to Albright.
Moog's innovation enables a
composer to record much more
music on' tape before he has to
make a splice. New Moog equip-
ment at the studio, purchased last
summer, helps to alleviate the

Several years ago Kinkaid took
up the soldering iron himself. He
and Dave Bates, another composer,
are now so involved in building
that they sell their ownrequipment.
Bates and Kinkaid try to avoid'
tying the composer down to tape.
Their object is to come as close as
possible to having one minute of
work produce one minute of music
using the methods Moog innovated.
The directors of the University
studio would like to have this capa-
bility, but do not have the funds
at this time. "What we need is a
flexible situation, a center that
could function in all directions that
electronic music is going now,"
says Albright.
Albright would also like the stu-
dio to become more available to
others. Several years ago they
tried opening the studio up to lit-
erary school students, however,
and the studio was swamped, Al-
bright says.

After the Friday meeting, Vice
President for Student Services Ro-,
bert Knauss, expressing disap-
pointment that the OSS p o li c yf
was rejected, said, "Although this
action changes the OSS p o li c yF
dramatically, I will enforce it."
Knauss added that he was pleas-'
ed with the role OSS played in
getting the new policy. "The prin-
ciple function of OSS", he said,'
"is to educate and advocate.In
this instance we did bothand
the result is a much stronger
statement of University-wide pol-
icy than ever before.
"It is stronger than any other
University policy," he added.
Later, Knauss said that t h e,
new policy "washes out the OSSj
policy."
SGC President Marty Scott said,
"I do not think the Regents pol-
icy does anything except reject thej
OSS policy in a nice way." He
criticized the new policy as weak
on the grounds that it would be
impossible to enforce and it would
only have a token impact on cor-
porations.
Business and Law School place-
ment office officials were unavail-
able for comment.

(Continued from Page 1)
This new regulation means that
if 'a graduate student works for
24 months as a teaching assistant
and then becomes a research as-
sistant, he may only hold the se-
cond appointment for 24 months.
Under present LSA regulations,
a person may hold a teaching
assistantship for up to five years,
after which time he is still eligi-
ble to work as a research assist-
ant or staff assistant.
Craig Harris, a sociology teach-
ing fellow, pointed out that many
graduate students are unable to
finish their degree program in four
years. He cited a survey conducted
by the American Sociological As-
sociation which showed the med-
ian time required to complete a
doctoral program in sociology was
eight years.
The proposed four year limit on
assistantships might thus be a
hardship for many graduate s t u-
dents.
Drafts of the new proposal are
now being reviewed by the deans
of the schools and colleges, insti-
PREGNANCY
PROBLEM?
THERE IS NO CHARGE
FOR OUR
ABORTION
Referral
WHY SPEND
MONEY NEEDLESSLY?
OUR PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES ARE FREE
Call (212) 722-5360
7 DAYS-24 HRS.

US. Naval Civil Engineering Lab
Recruiting Representative
from
Port Hueneme, California

a

(where you ski in the morning
and surf in the afternoon)
Interviewing graduates with
MS and PhD Degrees
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical Eng,
and Applied Mechanics
on
Wednesday, 24 February 1971
Interview appointments and info at your Placement
Office. All positions are in the Federal Career Civil
Service.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

tute heads, and department chair-
men. Recommendations from these
people must be turned in to Vice
President Smith before March 1.
Smith will then prepare a revised
draft which will go to the execu-
tive officers for final approval.
The teaching fellows also object
to the fact that no graduate stu-
dents were contacted concerning
the proposal. "We only got this
information [the proposal] by ac-
cident," said Mary Fox.
Both Fox and Harris are mem-
bers of the Graduate Assistants'

Coordinating Committee (GACC
which was hastily formed t h i
weekend to organize graduate op-
position to the proposal.
A statement released yesterday
by the GACC said:
"We are not opposed to a
formal statement of a graduate
student assistant program. B
such a statement of that pro-
gram should be an improvement
over our present situation. Vice
President Smith's proposals are
basically at odds with our in-
terests."

splicing problem, but the equip- - _ __ _ _
ment is not complete, and splicing
continues.
What happens if a composer gets
fed up with splicing tape in the ApplicationS now being acceptedfor:
University studio? "He builds his Std n
o 5 SEATSC
ANNE SCOTT Petitions and information available at S.G.C.
offices (1st floor S.A.B.)
"Crisis in American
Values: Women" Petitions must be in before
SUNDAY, Feb. 21, at 5:00 p.m.
American Culture Interviewing on Sunday & Monday, Feb. 21 & 22
Women and men of all schools and colleges are
Lecture Series urged to apply.
f --y===ot--yo<--== -o< --YC)=o.

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