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February 20, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-20

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ART EXHIBIT
AT
RIVE GAUCHE
1024 HILL ST.
by U of M students
FEB. 19-24
Open 8 p.m.-12 p.m. daily

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page three

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43 a4O

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
Rl SI NESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, February 20, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

news briefs
By The Associated Press

. . . . . . . . . . .

AID
AID is a referral agency organized for the purpose of offering
abortion and family planning information in order to relieve the
frustration too frequently encountered in these crises. We refer
men and women upon request to other agencies or qualified in-
dividuals whose facilities meet all medical guidelines for the pur-
pose of professional guidance in the fields of birth control, steril-
ization, contraception, and artificial insemination. All inquiries
are kept strictly confidental. We offer 24-hour, 7-day a week
servce. For further information, contact us at 1-313-964-4445.
TH I 4EEPEINOC

THE THIRD U.S. COURT OF APPEALS denied yesterday a
request to delay prosecution of six persons accused of plotting to
kidnap presidential aide Henry Kissinger and bomb government
heating tunnels in Washington.
Seven clergymen had sought the delay until the circumstances
surrounding the incident could be investigated.
There was no opinion accompanying the court's one-sentence re-
jection yesterday.
* * *
A DRIVE TO IMPEACH NIXON, introduced by Rep. Paul N.
McCloskey Jr., (R-Cal.), has met with little favorable reaction
thus far.
McCloskey introduced the proposal on the House floor Thursday
to protest Nixon's conduct of the Indochina War. No House members
present backed the proposal, and fellow Republicans argued strongly
against the measure.
** *
IRSAEL called on Egypt yesterday to enter direct peace talks,
saying only then will it consider withdrawing from any occupied
Arab territory.
Egypt, which reportedly says it is willing to sign a peace treaty if
Israel makes a complete withdrawal, served notice- earlier that it will
make no further concessions to peace.
The call for face-to-face talks came from Information Minister
Israel Galili.
A RUSSIAN DIPLOMAT'S CAR was set afire early yesterday
in a Silver Springs, Md., residential 'neighborhood just north of
Washington. No one was reported injured.
An anonymous male caller reported to the Associated Press that the
car had been firebombed as an "act of retaliation in the war of libera-
tion for Soviet Jewry."
PATRICIA KRENWINKLE confessed Thursday that she killed
two persons in the Sharon Tate murders and carved "War" on
the chest of one of them.
Krenwinkle confessed to killing coffee heiress Abigail Folger and
market owner Leno LaBianca. She said that Charles Manson, alleged
leader of the murders was not involved in any of the seven killings.
NAT'L CONVENTION
Dems urged to pass
newuvu election reform

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-Associated Press

Italian medical strike

*4M-UWUMMS VMA ii MUiiM CO, StC. II V UT000 AMy UStl
DIAL OPEN 12:45
662-6264 SHOWS AT
Liberty Sts. 1. 3, 5, 7, 9:05

STATE
THEATRE
Corner State &I

..

...........

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r49 CCAMPUSJ

1214 S. UNIV.
DIAL 8-6416
Doors Open At 12:45

A corridor of Rome University's huge Polyclinic Hospital is crowded with bedridden patients yesterday
as a result of a strike started last Wednesday by Italy's University medical personnel. The strike, by
university doctors, anesthetists, x-ray personnel, and Red Cross nurses, has brought this normally
crowded hospital close to the bursting point.
MIXED REACTION:
Nat'l health insurance backer-s
res ond to Nixon's message
WASHINGTON (A) - Proponents "The trouble is that Blue Cross, ings on the administration plan
of a national health insurance sys- at least, has been one of the real Monday, with Secretary of Health,
tem welcomed President Nixon's problems." Mrs. Griffiths said. Education and Welfare Elliot L.
"National Health Strategy" mrnes- "They have no real method of con- Richardson as the leadoff witness.
sage yesterday as a strong push trolling the costs. Elements of the plan involving
toward prompt enactment of some Emnt fth,.a nolig
national plan. "In fact, the higher the cost, the Social Security, under the Consti-
more money they make. The Sen- tution and congressional rules,
At the same time, comments of ate health subcommittee, of which must first be acted on by the House
Democrats who had already inuro- Kennedy is chairman, opens hear- Ways and Means Committee
duced health insurance bills, spot- ;_
lighted the issue likely to spark the
most controversy: dissatisfactionEx-J hnsoaides den
health insurance conipanlies. Ex J hn a d s d n
There was evident opposition alson.
to a Nixon proposal that would fur- h eL.
ther raise the Social Security pay-
roll tax. WASHINGTON (W) - Former Reached in New York, Vance
In his message to Congress: Johnson administration officials told a reporter he meant that the
Thursday Nixon advocated a Na- say they expected the Army to get Armiy should gather logistics type
tional Health Insurance Standards information or. possible civil dis- information rather than intelli-
Act that would require emplcyers turbance troublemakers from civil- gence about people.
to provide basic health insurance jian police and the FBI, not from Vance, a former secretary of the
coverage, through the private sys- spying by its own agents. Army and deputy secretary of de-
tem, for their employes. The em- . . fense, read from a report he filed
ployes would share in the cost. This clashed with an implication after the Detroit riots. In that re-
A bill introduced in the House by Asst. Secretary of Defense Rob- port he spoke of "listing bivouac
by Rep. Martha W. Griffiths tD- ert F. Froehlke Thursday that the sites and possible headquarters lo-
Mich.), and in the Senate by Sen. Army's controversial domestic in- cations and providing police data
Edward M. Kennedy (D.-Mass.), telligence operations were In ne and other information needed to
would provide a health insurance with a recommendation by Cyrus make an intelligent assessment" in
system administered directly by R. Vance after destructive racial connection with use of federal
Social Security and finaucei by riots in Detroit in 1967. troops.
contributions from employers, em- Froehlke said that Vance, who When it was noted that his re-
ployes and the U.S. Treasury. directed all federal activities in port mentioned "police data,"
While both Kennedy and Mrs. Detroit during the riots, recom- Vance said, "My feeling was that
Griffiths applauded Nixon for what mended later that the Army be or- that was the kind of things you
they called recognition of an urgent dered "to prepare information would get from the police and the
problem, they criticized the con- folders on the major cities of the FBI."
cept of a partnership between gov- United States in which it appeared Other Johnson administration of-
ernment and the private insurance that civil disturbances might oc- ficials, declining to be quoted by
industry. cur." name, agreed with Vance.

Cost o
living
Slows
WASHINGTON (;P) - The gov-
ernment's cost of living index for
January showed its smallest month-
ly increase in nearly four years
yesterday and prompted a White
House declaration that economic
policies to slow inflation are work-
ing.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported that its Consumer Price
Index, rose just one-tenth of one
per cent from December to Janu-
ary.
Reacting at the same moment
the report was released to the pub-
lic White House press secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler claimed effec-
tiveness for Nixon administration
economic policies and added:
"Also the fact that food prices
at the grocery store have not risen
over the past 12 months is very
encouraging."
Costs of consumer services were
up six tenths of one per cent, but
this was mostly offset by declines
in prices of used cars, clothes, and
some grocery store items.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Consumer Price Index had goneup
five-tenths of a per cent the pre-
ceding month. The index stood 5.2
per cent higher than one year ago,
the smallest 12 month rise since
March 1969.
On a dollars and cents basis the
new figures released Friday meant
it cost $119.20 in January to buy
the same goods and services that
cost $10 in 1967. These goods and
services cost $138.60 when com-
pared to what $100 would have pur-
chased in 1957-59.
Prices of food purchased at the
supermarket declined four - tenths
of one per cent after seasonal ad-
justments. Prices of meats and
fresh fruits and vegetables which
usually rise between December and
January instead declined this time.
But prices of eggs and dairy pro-
ducts which usually go down, went
up-eggs by 3.8 per cent.
The biggest single decline in
prices from December was for wo-
men's and girl's clothing, down
2.6 per cent. The largest increase,
apparently reflecting the winter
power shortage in cold weather
areas, was 1.5 per cent for fuel
oil and coal.
An accompanying report on pur-
chasing power of rank and file
workers showed their real earnings
advanced 11 cents from Decem-
ber to January principally because
of reductions in federal income tax
withholding rates.

COLOR by DeLuxew IQ UnitedArhsts
SHOWN TODAY AT 1:20-5:05-9:20
I~l. llr! -AND-
LARRY KRAMER and MARTIN ROSEN
present KEN RJ SELL'S film of
D. H. LARENCES
COLOR by DeLuxe United AistM
TODAY AT 3:00 AND 7:10

WASHINGTON Q()-Chairman
Lawrence F. O'Brien urged the
Democratic National Commit-
tee yesterday to approve re-
forms'that will make the 1972
presidential nomination a product
of an open political process.
"In pragmatic terms," O'Brien
said, "this meeting of the Demo-
cratic National Committee--the
governing body of this party--is
the true beginning of our effort
to regain the national leadership
and to put an end to this terrible
stagnation Richard Nixon has
brought to our country."
The 110-member national com-
mittee met to set procedures for
next year's nominating conven-
tion.
The major point of contention
at today's session was over the
formula for allocating delegates
at next year's convention.
The party's executive commit-
tee has suggested a formula giv-
ing each state three delegates

for each electoral vote, dividing
the remainder of the seats on the
basis of Democratic strengtn in
the last three presidential elec-
tions.
The executive committee reject-
ed a plan offered by the party's
O'Hara commission allocating
delegates on the basis of state
population and the Democratic
vote in the 1968 presidential elec-
tion.
The major practical difference
between the two plans is that the
executive committee's t a k e s
some votes from larger states
and gives them to smaller ones.
Both plans would give the larger
states a bigger share of the 1972
convention than they had in
1968.
The national committee was to
consider a proposal increasing
the 1972 convention from 2,322
to 3,014 votes but sharply reduc-
ing the number of alternates.

1
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The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mal.

.... .................

STUCK WITH AN
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CERTAINLY THE MOST EFFICACIOUS MANNER IS

FOR ONLY
$6
YOU CAN PLACE A
1 col. x 4" AD

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(SUCH AS)

mm*

3
BEDROOM
BI-LEVEL
Air-Conditioned
3 minutes from
Diag and Hospital
Garbage Disposal
Dishwasher
CORNER GEDDES
& FOREST

Folksinger'
LUKE BALDWIN
at
RIVE GAUCHE at 9 P.M.
Friday and Saturday
Admission 50c

EVERYBODY AND HIS BROTHER ARE
MAKING FILMS THESE DAYS
-Orson Welles
ANN ARBOR
8 mm
FILM FESTIVAL
1971
Last night-8:00 p.m.
R.C. AUDITORIUM
EAST QUAD
75c
Turk, Jo, Begubois, and
Beets are going

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ROBERT BRESSON WEEK-END
Saturday-Feb. 20
AU HAZARD BALTHAZAR
FRANCE (1966)
Regarded. as Biesson's masterpiece-it was voted
the Best Film of 1966 by Cahiers du Cinema. The
story is of a donkey Balthazar and is actually a com-
mentary on the lines of the people who own, love,
beat, and exploit him and each other.
Sunday-MOUCHETTE
FRANCE (1968)
"Mouchette is a masteroiece: a Bresson film pure

603 E. Liberty St.

DIAL 5-6290
DOORS OPEN 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

New York Daily News
d
PAR MOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
Ali Madraw - Ryan O'Neal

. MICHIGA.

"One of the
Year's Ten Best F'

AND REACH THE
HEARTS OF
33,000 READERS
ON MARCH 21
Place Your Ad
in Person at
420 Maynard

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\~~The Ymalla

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