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February 16, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

At State & Liberty Sts.
ENDS WEDNESDAY!
DIAL
662-
6264
.,', . s .-.eaei
COLU*+B'A DC IU8ES A.... +885 Pon,.,ow ,I
JACK NICHOLSON
FlVI IT .9IPIECES,,
"YEAR'S BEST"*
-N.Y. Film Critics
OPEN 1 P.M.
SHOWS: 1:20, 3:10, 5P.M.
7 P.M., 9P.M.

R.
MON. -FRI.
7:15-9:00
SAT.-SUN.-2:00-3:40
5:25-7:15-9:10

A
FRANKOVICH
PRODUCTION
PETER
SELLERS
SGOLDIE
HAWN

- ' ~ LJ~ a COOR I umb iatre= 1

Thursday, February 18th
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
presents an experimental production
of an original musical sketch
JOHANN ORPHEUS.
by FRED PIEGONSKI
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
Promptly at 3:10 P.M. ADMISSION FREE
603 E. Liberty
_ DIAL Shows at
5-62 * 1,3,5,7,
5-6290 9 p.m.
Ali Mac~raw - RyanO'Neal
FREE LIST \
SUSPENDED
No Ladies Dayj
price durinq John Marley& Ray Milland
Love Story FG IN.COLOR A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
presents
ISAACSTERN
World-renowned Violinist
IN RECITAL-IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Sun., Feb. 21, 2:30
PROGRAM
Sonata in B-flat, K. 454 Mozart I
Sonata No. 3, Op. 25 .. Enesco
Sonata No. 1 in G, Op. 78 ..... ........ . Brahms
Divertimento ......... ... Stravinsky

news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE UNITED STEEL WORKERS Union yesterday struck
three can manufacturing companies and reached agreement with
a fourth.
The contract agreement, reached with National Can Co.. provided
for at least $1 an hour raises over three years for the lowest paid
workers, said a representative of the Steel Workers international
office.
Negotiations, which began last November, are in indefinite
recess according to the three struck manufacturers.
SEN. EDWARD KENNEDY (D-Mass.) plans to use his new
post as chairman of the Senate health subcommittee to press
the case for a national health insurance system.
Although the subcommittee does not have legislative jurisdictionI
over the bill, Kennedy feels its prospects will be strongly enhanced
by holding hearings in Washington and throughout the nation.
The legislation, because it involves new taxes, falls under the
committee jurisdiction of Ways and Means in the House and Finance
in the Senate. Neither panel is considered likely to approve any
plan as comprehensive as Kennedy's, which provides comprehensive{
benefits for every person in the United States.
ABOUT 15 POLICEMEN were rushed into a two block area
of downtown Atlanta yesterday, to quell a disturbance in which
windows were broken, at least one officer was injured and 29
arrests were made.
Charges brought against those arrested include inciting to riot,
creating a turmoil and aggravated assault.,
Police reported that the disturbance began when an officer ar-
rested one of two blacks fighting with each other. Other blacks scuf-
fled with the arresting officer, and at least two were struck with
riot clubs.
THE POLISH GOVERNMENT yesterday announced it would
revoke on March 1 the sweeping price hikes which provoked
bloody pre-Christmas rioting.j
Premier Piotr Jaroszewicz said this was made possible by aidj
from the Soviet Union and a possible increase in livestock production.
The Premier, who replaced ousted communist party chief Gomulka,
seven weeks ago, appealed to 10,000 striking mill workers to return
to work.
Workers immediately rejected the appeal and repeated demands
for more pay and cheaper food.

Tuesday, February 16, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

State

Democrats

-Associated Press
Police quell disturbance
Police arrest a youth yesterday in downtown Atlanta. Police moved
in after windows were broken. (See Digest.)
- ---- -- --- - - - -
'CONFLICT OF INTEREST':
Hart e asks review
of Starts' holdings4-.
WASHINGTON (A') - Sen. Vance Hartke (D-Ind.) urged

c" I P

SitI~titn

-d a4l,
:43 t I y

* yesterday that the Senate inquire immediately into Secretary
PORTUGUESE GUINEA President Sekou Toure chargedain of Commerce Maurice H. Stans' interest in a Penn Central
an interview published yesterday that foreign mercenaries are railroad subsidiary and determine whether the Cabinet of-
preparing a new invasion of his country. ficer had knowledge of transactions involving a so-called
Accusing Portugal of permitting whites from America, France fblind trust
and West Germany to train in Guinea-Bissau, he further charged b
that nationals of his own country were being recruited for future Hartke said he would ask Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, (D-
aggression. Wash.), chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, to
Guinea was attacked last November and Toure then claimed the hold hearings "at the earliest possible date to hear Secretary
invasion was mounted by Portugal. Stans' explanation of matters which on their face seem to
indicate a strong possibility of
TTT'TlT A iU)AXTIn rriet

urge end to wr,
attack repression
From Wire service Reports
Michigan Democrats ended an unusually quiet conven-
tion this weekend, as they avoided major battles on contro-
versial issues.
The 2,454 delegates quickly adopted resolutions which
called for an immediate cease-fire in Indochina and an end
to political repression.
The party also passed a watered-down resolution holding
out a hope of amnesty to men who, as a matter of conscience,
refuse to fight in the Indochina war.
The disunity present last August when Democrats passed
an amnesty plank for draft -- -_-
resisters seemed to have dis,-
appeared as the party pre-
sented a consensus platform
in preparation for the battle
for Republican Robert Grif-
fin's Senate seat in 1972.rg
Responding to a movement by
the liberal wing of the party, mem-
bers drafted and passed a cam-
relating to the arrest and trial of b 1 1e n
Angela Davis. MIAMI BEACH, Fla. () -
Davis, a communist and ex- George Meany, president of the
philosophy professor at UCLA, AFL-CIO said yesterday that any
was arrested last year after being plans by President Nixon to single
charged with conspiracy in the out the construction industry for
killing of a judge in California. wage-price freezes would be un-
The resolution stated that the workable and unfair.
party "insists the established le- Meany also labeled as "gim-
gal principle of presumption of micks" the administration's reve-
iInnocence be emphasized by pub- nue sharing program and a pro-
lic officials . . . pending the trials posal to consolidate the Labor De-
of persons who may otherwise be- partment with other agencies in
come political victims, such as An- a governmental reform plan.
gela Davis, the Fathers Berrigan Speaking at a news conference
and co-defendants under indict- after the opening session of the
ment." AFL-CIO Executive Council's win-
The same resolution condemned ter meeting, Meany said Nixon's
the use of violence as "undemo- revenue sharing plan to return $5
cratic and counterproductive." billion a year to the states would
The Indochina resolution called endanger funds for education, anti-
for an immediate cease fire, with- poverty, civil rights and other pro-
drawal of all American troops by grams because there would be no
Dec. 31, release of prisoners of assurance how the states spent the
war, and the holding of national unehyt
elections in Southeast Asian coun- oney.
tries, supervised by an interna- The labor council recommended
tional body. instead pumping another $6 billion
The resolution on draft resisters into money starved social pro-
was much milder than the one grams already authorized and- spe-
edastA tthiteonly cifically earmarked for spending.
r cogni inAughose who cannot Meany also described as a "gim-
participatein the war c"mick" Nixon's proposal to reduce
riciaei h a. the present federal Cabinet de-
Last weekend's convention, on prent edhinludin lm-
the other hand, focused mostly on partments to eight including lump-
strategy as leading party figures ing the Labor Department with
jockeyed for early support for the other agencies into four broad de-
Senate race against Griffin. partments of human resources,
Atty. Gen. Frank Kelley and community development, natural
former Detroit Mayor Jerome Ca- resources and economic develop-
vanaugh are currently front run- ment.
ners in the race, and were present Meany listed the AFL-CIO's two
at the convention soliciting future top legislative goals in Congress
support. this year as a national health in-
Cavanaugh, who unsuccessfully surance program to cover all
challenged ex-governor G. Mennen Americans, and a boost in the $1.60
Williams for the party's nomina- minimum wage to at least $2.
tion in 1968, has continued to be He said the AFL-CIO would go
active in the party, though party along with federal controls on all
leaders expect Wayne County Cir- forms of income if the President
cuit Judge Blair Moody Jr. to pro- felt them necessary and applied
vide strong competition if he en- them nationwide rather than to
ters the race as expected. just one industry.

V 11 IETNAI IBAN
Army halts slot-machine use

TICKETS: $7.00-$6.50-$6.00-$5.00-$3.50-$2.50
at
The University Musical Society
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Office Hours: Mon. thru Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12 {
(Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium Box Office 1 1 hours before performance time)

i
°:k .

WASHINGTON (P-The Army
late last week announced that it
plans to remove slot machines
from its clubs in Vietnam.
But senatorial investigators are
still interested in determining
how the devices got there in the
first place and whether the mil-
lions of dollars put into them have
contributed to widespread cor-
ruption.
Hearings opening before the
Senate permanent investigations
subcommittee tomorrow are ex-
pected to produce demands that
the machines be banned from all
military bases.
75c "

In making its announcement,
the Army said it is banning the
more than 1,700 slot machines
from its bases in Vietnam be-
cause of diminishing use and in-
creased difficulty in maintaining
them in a war zone.
But some members of Con-
gress see the machines as the
front for the corruption they say
has spread throughout the maa-
agement of the military services'
annual $6 billion nonappropriated
fund activities.
Sen. Edward J. Gurney (R-
Fla.) reporting to the subcommit-
tee on a trip to Vietnam last
November for the investigations
panel, is the latest to demand
that the machines be banned
from the bases.

He said the potential of that
corruption is more profound than
merely the stealing of slot ma-
chine receipts or the temptation
to steal.
"All too often the firms and in-
dividuals who install, service
and profit from these machines
are not the sort with which the
U.S. government should deal,"
he said.
In the past the Pentagon has
defended the presence (of slot
machines on overseasbases as a
morale builder and as an accept-
able alternative to unsupervised
and perhaps more destructive
forms of gambling.
In 1969, the Pentagon repsrted
there were 16,318 slot machines
operating at U.S. military bases
overseas and that their total in-
come was $67.72 million.

1110 upr y.
According to Hartke, Stans had
a $318,000 stock interest in a maj-
or Penn Central railroad subsid-
iary at the time his department
was involved in Nixon administra-
tion efforts to save the railroad
from bankruptcy last June.
Stans did not specifically men-
tion these holdings in a financial
statement to t he Senate Com-
merce Committee dated Jan. 13,
1969.
Stans last week indicated the
holdings were included in a clause
that referred to "undivided inter-
ests of indeterminable value" in
two partnerships.
Stans. in his financial state-
ment, pledged to put these hold-
ings and all other assets into a
blind trust and order the trustee
to make no accountings or re-
ports to him.
However, in response to a ques-
tion, Stans indicated knowledge of
a trust transaction which he said
occurred in September 1969.

41.

AAFC

7-9:30

--14

NOW AT
POPULAR PRICES

'

Ali McGraw
in
Goodbye Columbus
Aud. A Tues., Feb.16

A RAY STARK" HERBERT ROSS Productoa,
Barbra Stresad
George Segal
Tkow
andlthe
Panavsm' Co~orCD
TONIGHT AT 7 & 9
m! -

RADICAL FILM SERIES
Alexander Dovzhenko's
A EARTH
A detailed personal picture of the
collectivization of Russian farms
"EARTH remains a true classic of the silent screen.
-Arthur Knight
75c
TUES.-ALICE'S RESTAURANT, Alice Lloyd Hall,
7-9-11 p.m.Q
WED.-NEWMAN CENTER, 331 Thompson (between
William and Liberty) 7-8:30-10 p.m.
meeseennssmeneeee

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TONIGHT

I/II

"The 'FACES' of the skin
flicks" LATimes
RELESEDBY U-MFLM DW RIBUTORSC
COLOR byMoveIE

Oefinit in The Hitchcock Tradition
GP q cocoR 00
"Bird"-7:00 only
"Couples-9:00 only

SEATS ON SALE! $1-$4.50!

PPTH orUM _
DOWNTOWN ANN' ARUOM
WNFORMATION 701-8700
"The most revealing and sensiilve
film ever about our generation.
A fantasticl flCk."-EVO

UNOMI

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Conn~ctions

A provocative

Andy "

U .I s... .ik' -AA JW,

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