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February 14, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-14

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37 .MAPLE R0.
MON. -FRI.
7 :1i5-9:00
SAT.-SUN.-2:00-3:40
5:25-7:15-9:10

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Sridligan

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NEW1S PHONE: 7M-0552
BUISINES PIIO'N: 761-0-5-

Sunday, February 14, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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,FRANKOVICH
PRODUCTION
PETER
SELLERS
GOLDIE
HAWN

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SERIESO**00

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winces

Three New Programs
of 22 Short Films
by the World's
Leading Film Makers
Momentum, Jordan Belson
Egypte, 0QEgypte, written and
narrated by Jean Cocteau
Unknown Reasons
Fred Mogubgub

LKJb COLOR-From Columbia Picturesj
- s
- HOURS -
Weekdays: 10-4:30 p.m.
- \
INDIVIDUAL TICKET SALES
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
February 10-20

news bif
By The Associated Press
ITALIAN RIOTERS, defying a ban on public rallies, attacked
police and erected barricades last night in Reggio Calabria, in a
new outbreak of violence over the naming of rival city Catanzaro
as regional capital of Calabria.
Reggio police threw tear gas and turned water hoses on the
several hundred demonstrators, who in turn beat and stripped several
policemen.
In Rome and Milan, tens of thousands marched in protest over
the government's failure to end the Reggio rioting.
DR. JOHN CORBALLY JR., chancellor and president of
Syracuse University since 1969, will become President of the Uni-
versity of Illinois effective Sept. 1.
Corbally will succeed Dr. David Dodds Henry, who has headed
the University for 16 years.
THE DEATH TOLL in last week's southern California earth-
quake reached sixty-two yesterday with the discovery of a wo-
man's body in the wreckage of a veteran's hospital near Los
Angeles.
The body, found by rescue crews, accounts for the last missing
person at the 45-year-old hospital site.
A total of 43 persons died in the collapse of two wings of- the
aging structure.
THE MONTANA SENATE passed by a 31-20 vote a resolu-
tion favoring the speedy and complete withdrawal of American
troops from Vietnam.
The resolution urged President Nixon to announce a specific
deadline for the withdrawal.
The Senate action also resulted in a 39-11 vote requesting an end
to the military draft and the establishment of a paid army.
* *
INDIAN PRIME MINISTER INDIRA GHANDI'S ruling Con-
gress party emerged yesterday as the only single political party
with a chance to win a majority in the March parliamentary
elections.
When the nomination lists were closed, Mrs. Ghandi's party had
entered candidates for 442 of the 518 seats. None of the other seven
national parties filed nominations for even half the races.
GARDNER ACKLEY, the Demoratic National Committee's
chief economist, said yesterday President Nixon's revised "eco-
nomic game plan" is an improvement over the old one but is
still inadequate.
He said the proposed budget and other Nixon policies clearly
cannot achieve the administration's targets for Gross National Pro-
duct and unemployment.
Ackley, professor of economics at the University, gave his views
as chairman of the Democratic Policy Council on Economic affairs.
Pentagon launches million
dollar television campaign

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-Associated Press
Sepacrd 7 vaiks on moon
Apollo 14 Moon Mission Commander Alan B. Shepard, Jr. stands
beside the American flag after it was .deployed on the moon dur-
ing the first extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. The
photo, released yesterday by NASA, shows shadow of the fellow
astronaut, Edgar D. Mitchell.
RESORT AREAS HIT:

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Accord near on
ol price dispute
TEHRAN ( - Price talks between Western oil companies
and the producer. countries of the Persian Gulf continued
last night with both sides predicting a compromise agreement
soon.
"We are optimistic now that with a bit of luck we have
got an agreement," said the spokesman for the 22 companies,
John Collins of British Petroleum. Saudi Arabian Oil Min-
ister Zeki Yamani said: "The situation is promising."
Collins indicated price levels would be decided before
the Feb. 15 deadline set up by the producer countries. They
have warned that unless an agreement is reached by that
time they will introduce legis- -- - ---
lation to increase prices uni--
laterally and shut off oil sup- H art blasts
plies if the companies fail to
comply with the laws.
"Both sides made genuine ef- L aos v eil
forts to narrow the gaps and one
or two concessions have been WASHINGTON (P - Sen. Phil-
made on both sides," said Collins. ip Hart said Friday the Nixon
The producers want $1.26 per bar- administration is tret.ting Con-
rel for their oil as against the cur- gress and the American public
rent price of just under $1. "like a bunch of gullible dupes"
Lord Strathalmond, the leader by issuing statements packed with
Df a team of world oil company "semantic loopholes a n d clever
negotiators, reported last night he traps" about the U.S. role in Laos.
is hopeful that an agreement will The Michigan Democrat, who
be reached today with six Persian has not been in the forefront of
Gulf oil producing countries on a recent war critics, expressed doubt
new price deal, about repeated administration
He hinted that the question of contentions that no U.S. combat
guarantees againsthleapfrogging ground troops are in Laos. Con-
price demands have been settled, aos, Cambodia andtheir use in
except for one legal point still to "To my mind," Hart said in a
be resolved. Leap frogging tnvolv- st "itdis rely ikel
es one country boosting oil prices that Americans will be found par-
above those of another country, ticipating in ground action in
and the first country again boost- Laos. Then we will be treated to
ing prices to compete, and so on. an elaborate explanation of why
Maj. Abdul Salam Jalloud, Lib- these particular men did not fit
ya's deputy premier, said Saturday the administration's earlier ex-
the Gulf States' demands "do not planation of ground troops."
even reach up to the minimum of Some newsmen in Indochina
our demands." He said Libya have reported seeing American
would impose tougher terms on soldiers on the ground in Laos,
the oil companies than those be- some wearing South Vietnamese
ing negotiated in Tehran. uniforms, during the current
"The Libyan Arab republic will South Vietnamese invasion of that
demand higher oil prices spon af- country.
ter the end of the present round The U.S. command in Saigon
of the Tehran talks," Jalloud said says "There are no U.S. ground
in an interview with the Yugoslav combat troops operating in Laos."
news agency Tanjug. He said the Asked if long-range patrols were
Libyian government would grant considered in the category of
concessions only on a contracting ground combat troops, a spokes-
basis and the state-owned Libyan man said "they could be," indi-
National Oil Corporation's role cating they might be considered
would be greatly expanded. "intelligence gathering" units.

i

Calif. pollution study

Series

Tickets

$3

available at door

CINEMA II
presents
"A TASTE OF HONEY"
with RITA TUSH INGHAM
SUNDAY--1 and 3 p.m.
Aud. A--Angell Hall' 75c
NEXT WEEK: "Birthday Party"
screenplay by Harold Pinter

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (P) - control any project that
More than 11 million city dwelling the environment. But the
Californians face "a critical state said some action can't v
of clear and present danger" from the lengthy legislative pro
pollution, says a report to Gov. urged immediate action on
Ronald Reagan. torium on development al
The California Environmental state's 1,200-mile long c
Study Council told Reagan, "In strong motor vehicle pollut
reviewing the state's environmental: trols, a study to see hov
condition, it is clear that strong people can live in the Los
action will be necessary if certain and San Francisco areas
regions within the state are to re- killing themselves with th
main suitable for habitation." they produce, and giving
The report from the 14 member zens the right to sue in b
council, which was appointed by their environment.
Reagan, said air pollution is even
jeopardizing the health of persons
in California resort areas such as ~ l m b r
Palm Springs, Malibu, Lake Tahoe C m bers
and Catalina Island and Carmel.
The report said pollution has LONDON () - An inter
grown to a state-wide problem. effort to conquer Mt. Evere
The council, composed of experts most difficult route began
from the corporate, academic, day when eight British t
scientific and governmental com- men left London for a ren
munities, submitted its report to in Nepal. Journey's end c
the Republican governor and the a woman on the roof of th
California Legislature on Thursday for the first time.
with no fanfare. The television men's job
Although air pollution is primar- cord the adventures of 32
ily an urban problem, it is even taineers from 12 countries
infiltrating traditional resort areas assault the world's highest]
where city-dwelling Californians go climbing its. virgin-and ti
"to get away from it all," the re- ous-southwest face.
port said. In Palm Springs last The enormous, slab-side
summer and fall, the council re- of 29,028-foot Everest is t
ported, Air Pollution Control Dis- Great Problem in mount
trict officials found that oxidants jargon. The expedition's
in the air were above safe levels on to surmount it will be the
60 days out of 88 monitored. of "the biggest coordinat
The main proposal of the council vision film ever made,"s
was creation of a state agency to British Broadcasting Corp.

affects
council
wait for
cess. It
a mora-
ong the
oastline,
ion con-
w many
Angeles
wi ;lout
e smog
all citi-
ehalf of

attempt to scale Mt. Everest

WASHINGTON (M) - The Pen-
tagon, confident Congress will
provide funds to make military
life more attractive is buying TV
time to beam recruiting mes-
sages to June graduates.
It's an attempt to boost en-
listments during the second half
of the year to make personnel
turnover less of a problem in
1973 when the Nixon administra-
tion hopes to switch to an all-
volunteer military force.
The Army is purchasing an
estimated $3 million worth of
network time on ABC, CBS and
NBC. In the past the Army relied
on public service ads donated by
local stations.

The purchased time, averaging
22 minutes at each network, will
beam recruiting messages during
televised movies and such shows
as "Mannix," "Love Ainericr~n
Style," "The Bold Ones" and
Mission: Impossible."
Asst. Secretary of Defen';e
Roger T. Kelley said Friday new
incentives could be offered to the
June crop of graduates if Con-
gress acts on President Nixon's
military legislation by May 1.
The administration has re-
quested a 50 per cent boost in a
recruit's pay, higher salaries and
living allowances for other low-
grade enlisted men, better quar-
ters and more ROTC scholar-
ships.

national
st by its
yester-
ielevisien
adezvous
mild put
e woild
is to re-
2 moun-
a; they
peak by
reacher-
cd front
he Last
aineer's
attempt
subject
ed tele-
said the

To date, Everest has been con-
quered by way of the ridges which
divide its three-faced triangle
shape. The first team to climb it-
a British expedition in 1953 on the
eve of the coronation of Queen
Elizabeth II-took the "easy"
route over the southeast shoulder.
So did the Swiss, Indians, Ameri-
cans and Japanese in succeeding
years.
On the difficult routes, the north
face, slashed by ravines and
ridges, is possibly the simplest.
But the Communist Chinese rule
its approaches through Tibet snd
western climbers are unlikely to be
granted access.
BBC instigated this expedition
and arranged for its financing. The
film unit-made up partly of BBC
staffers who are also experienced

mountaineers-will make a docu-
mentary for worldwide release.
The climbers include a parachu-
tist-turned-mountaineer who could
be the first woman on the roof of
the world, Yvette Vaucher, 41,
from Geneva. She will be accom-
panied by her school teacher hus-
band Michel.
The BBC film is being produced
by Ned Kelly, 36, an experienced
mountaineer. He is helped by South
African Antony Thomas, 30, who
says: "This is the first truly inter-
national attempt on Everest. So
many people have written and
made films about Everest, but they
haven't written or filmed the real
stories about the climbers."

NOW
"A Joy To Watch. Ghislaine D'Orsay excels every
other performance I have seen in recent movies!"
-Roger Greenspun, N.Y. Times

DIAL 8-6416
WINNER OF
9
INTERNATIONAL

AWARDS
DIARY OF A
SCHIZOPHRENIC

1
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Ike & lina
Turner
REVUE
Coming March 12

GIRL

1i

THE UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN MEN'S
GLEE CLUB presents
Oh Happy Day!
Its annual Spring and
pre-competition concert
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
Hill Auditorium-8:30
Under the direction of
PROFESSOR WILLIS PATTERSON
and featuring THE FRIARS

"Outrageously raunchy,
huto-Look Magazine
"Should be seen. The best
Warhol Producion 10 date"
-uith Crist. NBC -TV
Warhol s
Joe
Dallesandro
in -

r i!
AAFC 7-9:30 75c d
Al McGraw
int
Goodbye Columbus
Aud, A Tues., Feb. 16
Sat., Sun.-Feb. 13, 14
GREED
dir. ERICH VON STROHEIM (1925)
Zasu Pitts and her husband dentist fall from finan-
cial heights because of their GREED. A movie with a
message.
"GREED unquestionably contains the fullest depic-
tion of Stroheimian underworld and the most intense
contrast between extremes of innocence and de-
generacy."
Stroheim, Joel Finler
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
Incorrect phone number
was printed in Daily for
MERLE NORMAN COS-
METICS.
Correct
phone number is
761-0090

BEST FILM OF 1970
N.Y. Film Critics
DIAL ,'"
662- r
6264
i1, y
M PAPIC T,4t s ....wrw+$$ S P.raw.
JACK NICHOLSON
JAI vII ERUM PIIEr
NOW at the State Theatre
Shows at 1:15-3-5-7-9 p.m.
Ct" 1'

THE LLANGOLLEN AWARD-Won by the Club
at the international Musical Eisteddfod
-1959 and 1963-

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