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February 13, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-13

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Saturday, February 13, 1971

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 13, 1971

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Tads
Sebring
CHECKMATE
State Street ati Liberty

PRIMARY ELECTION MONDAY

Hopefuls run for council seats

(Continued from Page 1)
One of Faber's most pressing
concerns about the city is hous-
ing.. He says the city is "not
building enough new units" and
charges Ann Arbor industry is
"serviced by workers who cannot
afford to live here."
He says the most important
moves the city can make in the
housing area, besides more con-
struction, are to "protect the
downtown area from "business en-
croachment" and upgrade down-
town areas by providing low in-
terest loans and building parks.
Faber voted in favor of the
city's marijuana ordinance at its
first reading and strongly supports
the law. The ordinance would re-
duce the penalty for possession of
marijuana from a felony to a mis-
demeanor.
Campaigning has been in pro-
gress in the second ward since
January and has consisted mostly
of telephone and door-to-door
canvassing by both candidates.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Ann Arbor's Newest Picture Framers
Innovative Framing, Reasonably Priced, Done by
Experienced Framers and Conservators.
FINE CONTEMPORARY MOULDINGS " DRY MOUNTING
RESTORATION * 20% ARTISTS DISCOUNT
ONE WEEK SERVICE
MEGAFRAMES
217 N. Main St.
(across from Post Office)
769-9420
Monday-Saturday 10-5 - Monday Evening 7-9
- - - -

In the second ward Donald W.,
Robinson is running unopposedI
for the Republican nomination.I
He will face the winner of the
Democratic primary in the gener-
al election, April 6.
In the first ward, Paul Spann
and Norris Thomas are contend-
ing for the Democratic nomina-
tion for the seat vacated by Dem-
ocrat H. C. Curry.
Thomas, who works for t h e
Washtenaw County Legal A i d
Society, feels the most important
issues of the campaign are police-
community relations and the en-
vironment.
He says he is "fed up with police
mistreating people" and says peo-
ple have "no redress" of griev-
ances against the police.
He calls sending officers on
campus a "misuse of police man-
power" and says police should
concentrate on "organized crime."'
He calls automobiles a major
environmental problem, saying
"efficient mass transportation" is
necessary for the city.
Thomas says he "certainly would
support" the council's proposed,
marijuana ordinance. Further, he
feels the city should "ban all laws
against marijuana smoking."
Thomas's opponent, Paul Spann,
is a local minister.
One of the major problems of
teaching Ann Arbor is the cities'
"racist environment," Spann says.
He terms the housing situation
in Ann Arbor "lousy." While ad-
mitting the public housing pro-
gram in Ann Arbor has brought
"some relief," he calls its approach
a "farce" saying it gives poor
people only "poor single-cla d
shacks."
While saying police-communityj
relations in Ann Arbor are "on
the mend," Spann calls for in-
tensified recruitment of officers
from the community and more
"community surveillance" of t h e
police department.
He calls for the "de-politicizing"
of the model cities program, say-
ing model cities "must belong to
the people."
He also voices support for the
proposed marijuana ordinance

saying he would "go with the idea"
of reducing the penalty for pos-
session.
Republican Edward Rutka is un-
opposed in his bid for his party's
nomination in the first ward and
will face the winner of the Demo-
cratic primary.
In the fourth ward two Re-
publicans, Ronald West and
Richard Hadler, are seeking their
party's nomination for the seat of
Republican Roy Weber.
West holds a degree in forestry
from the University, says the basic
issue of his campaign is the en-
vironment. He calls for a govern-
ment commission with "commun-
ity input" to work on environ-
mental problems.
He says he favors the proposed
marijuana ordinance but fears it
would give police "broader pow-
ers." He would like to see police
powers in the matter "spelled
out."
He stresses, however, that he
is "not a believer in community
control of police."
West's opponent, Richard Had-
ler, says he opposes the passage

Hadler feels the major envir-
onmental concern for the city is
the "treatment of the Huron Riv-
er."
In the April general election the
winner of the Republican primary
will face Democrat Gilbert E. Lee
who is running unopposed in the
Democratic primary in the fourth
ward.
In the third ward, Peter Wright
is running unopposed for the Re-
publicans and Nelson K. Meade is
running unopposed for the Demo-
crats. The two will face each
other in the April general election
for the seat of Democrat Nicholas
Kazarinoff, who is leaving coun-
cil.
In the fifth ward, John Mc-
Cormick is unopposed in the Re-
publican primary and Donald
Warren is unopposed in the Demo-
cratic primary. McCormick and
Warren will run in April for the
seat of Democrat Henry Stadler
who is not seeking re-election.

of the marijuana ordinance.
doesn't significantly change t
existing situation, he says.

It
the

Regents decline action
on students' demands

(Continued from Page 1)
The protesters decided to send o
University guard to the Regents
with the list of demands and a re-
quest to send one Regent to talk
with the protesters.
The demonstrators then began to
discuss their tactics. Several
speakers stressed the need to pub-
licize the demands and asked the
crowd to think of "creative ways
of implementing" the shutdown of,
"administrative functions" in the
event that the Regents did not ac-
cept the demands.
This discussion came to an end
when Col. Frederick Davids, Safe-
ty Director at the University and
former State Police Commander,

came out of the Regents' meeting
and told the group that they would
be allowed to send two representa-
tives to discuss the demands with
the Regents.
When the two delegates returned
from the meeting, Jenkins ex-
plained that the Regents' general
response to the demands was that
the demands be taken through
proper channels before Regental
discussion.
When asked if they considered
the demands of immediate concern,
Jenkins said the Regents replied
negatively.
Bachman said that although the
Regents favored the demand to
establish a child care center, they
pointed to Gov. Milliken's recent
appropriations proposal alloting
the University $19 million less than
it asked for as the major reason
for denying the request.
After being informed of the Re-
gents' reply to the demands, the
protesters went to the SAB.

residents
file suit,
protest tax'
(Continued from Page 1)
month to pay to the school board
the $53,000 it has collected from
the monthly fee to date.
One of the plaintiffs, Dale
Sprick, Grad, said, "The tenants
were forced to sue the Regents in
order to challenge the legality of
the action as the Regents had
made the payment without first
testing the legality of their ac-
tion."
The residents contend in their
suit that the Regents action is un-
lawful because "no statute, to the
knowledge of the plaintiffs, auth-
orized the Regents to make pay-
ments in lieu of taxes to any tax-
ing authority including the school
district.
Further, they assert that even if
the Regents did have the right to'
make such an assessment, the im-
position of the tax only on the
residents of Northwood and Uni-
versity Terrace violates those res-
idents' right to equal protection
since not all University property.
is subject to the levy.
"No other taxing body in the
world taxes parents directly for
the cost of their children's educa-
tion," the residents claim. "The
whole of society is benefited by
the education of each child and
society as a whole must pay the
cost," the suit continues.
The suit called on the Regents
to show cause why they should not
cease the collection of a $6 month-
ly school assessment and refund
the money collected since August.
The school district was asked to
show cause why it should not re-
fund the collected sums to the
residents.
The residents have asked that
the University respond within 20
days to the suit and that the court
bar the University from further
collection of the levy in the mean-
time.
Air loss hits
3-year high
(Continued from Page 1)
ing troop airlifts, gunships, supply
and medical evacuation flights.
Meanwhile, South Vietnamese
spokesmen claimed yesterday that
their forces have cut the Ho Chi
Minh trail inside Laos in several
places, but provided no details.
President Nguyen van Thieu
told newsmen, "We have discover-
ed many storage and depot areas
which means we have selected a
good target.'
In Vientiane, the Royal Laotian
Government declared a state of na-
tional emergency yesterday and
handed control of the country to the
military.
Premier Prince Souvanna urged
people not to panic.
In Cambodia heavy fighting was
reported near Takeo, 50 miles
south of Phnom Penh. The Cam-
bodian command claimed 15 com-
munists killed with Cambodian
losses at 15 killed and 15 wounded.
Informed sources said a Cambo-
dian general, identified as Brig.
Gen. Neak San, was among the
dead.
North Vietnam said yesterday
that U.S. warships fired on North
Vietnamese fishing boats off the
coast just north of the 17th paral-
lel, killing and wounding several
fishermen.
The Peoples' Republic of China

warned yesterday that the invasion
of Laos was a "grave menace" and
that it will not remain indiffrent
to the situation.
"The Chinese people express
their firm support of the determin-
ation of the Indochinese peoples to
defeat the United States," reported
the Peking broadcast monitored in
Tokyo.

-Associated Press

Moon rocks

Open Only to U of M Students, Faculty, Staff & Alumni
& immediate families

NASS
A SECOND

9'

Technicians at the Manned Spacecraft Center begin unpacking
core samples of lunar soil and moon rocks brought back to
Houston, Tex., by the Apollo 14 astronauts.
BUDGET SLASHED:
Cris thrat'U'

AU
PLAN E
M Jet Transportation
from Detroit Metro
(including transfers and taxes)

I

MAR. 1-5
5 DAYS AND 4 NIGHTS
TOTAL PACKAGE, COMPLETE WITH DELUXE ACCOMMODA-
TIONS AT THE MONTEAGU BEACH HOTEL, ONLY $135 + $10
tax & tips. OPTIONS-Complete breakfast & 7 course dinner
daily for $30; scuba, sailing, fishing, water skiing, car and motor-
cycle rental, at additional savings to you.

Petitioning now open for:
Central Student Judiciary
5 SEATS
Petitions and information available at S.G.C.
offiCes (1 st floor S.A.B.)
Petitions must be in before
MONDAY, Feb. 15, at 5:00 p.m.
Interviewing on Sunday & Monday, Feb. 14 & 15
Women and men of all schools and colleges are
urged to apply.

UAC Travel
2nd Floor, Mich. Union

763-2147

I

administrative services by students international

I

Gees QS. ,kt'bto
Ge'eS Aitl oW
lO'jj~

(Continued from Page 1)
us," Harris said yesterday, "It
would completely negate any plan-
ned tax increase. Where a city in-
come tax might raise $850,000 to
$1,800,000, this move would take
that much away."
Harris and some University ad-'
ministrators feel the Legislature
will not approve such stringent
cut-backs for fiscal 1971-72. But by
early summer, when the Legisla-
ture will finally consider educa-
tional appropriations in earnest,
the state's financial troubles may
worsen.
Meanwhile, the drastic cuts in
the present budget approved by the
Legislature last fall when the Gen-
eral Motors strike slashed the
state's income may not be enough
to avert a threatened deficit for,
the 1970-71 fiscal year.
According to Fauri, there is
some likelihood this further deter-
ioration in the state's position
could cause an additional one per
cent cut in the University's present
budget, adding to the one per cent
cut imposed by the state last No-
vember.
The overall direction of Milli-
ken's proposal, aside from the eco-
nomic belt-tighting, amounts to a
new emphasis on community col-
leges and smaller campuses. Near-
ly $1 million of the Governor's pro-
posed $2.8 million increase for the
University would go toward the
Flint and Dearborn campuses.
New struggling schools, such as
Wayne County Community Col-
lege, have received healthy in-
creases. But even among the three
major state-supported universities
-Michigan State, Wayne State
and the University-the Univer-
sity received the smallest increase.
Thus, according to Milliken's
plan, enrollment at the Flint and
Dearborn campuses would con-
tinue to increase, while the enroll-
ment at Ann Arbor would fall next,
year and then level off somewhat..
"We expect the major schools
to be no larger in September than
they are right now," said state
Controller Glen Allen after Mil-
liken's budget was announced.
However, still a distinct possi-
bility-one which University lob-
byists will be pushing for in the
coming months-is a tax increase
this year rather than in January,
1972 as the governor proposed.
Although this would come largely
as a response to worsening con-
ditions at the state level, the Uni-
versity would be placed in a bet-
ter bargaining position.
Milliken's budget projects a 13.5
per cent increase in state tax rev-
enue in fiscal 1971-72
Compared to tax revenue in-.
creases totaling nearly 3 per cent
for the past two years, many legis-
lators are skeptical that that rate
will be achieved and are advocat-
ing an immediate tax increase to
guarantee a balanced budget.
Meanwhile, University adminis-

trators are worried that the net
effect of a small state appropria-
tion will be to decrease the aca-
demic prowess and standing of the
University.
The feeling among administra-
tors appears to be one of frustra-
tion. While the Regents still have
nominal control through the state
constitution over how the Univer-
sity's money is spent, the Legisla-
ture has placed increasing re-
strictions in recent years on
money it has given the University.
For example, by forcing the
University to name its tuition hike
last year before they approved the
higher education appropriation,
the state was able to control the
size of the University's budget by
adjusting the final state appro-
priation. Thus, as one administra-
tor put it, "even if we were to
raise tuition over seven per cent
to make upfor their cut, the con-
troller could remove an equal
amount from our allotment."
And, while the issue of the Uni-
versity's autonomy is being bat-
tled in the courts, the University
has thought it better to accept the
restrictions rather than jeopardize
future allocations.
Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Day Calendar
U-M Extension Services: 21st Mathe-
matics Education Conference, Rackham
- Registration, 8 a.m.
Gymnastics: Mich.vs. Ohio State,
Crisler Arena, 1:30 p.m.
Swimming: Mich. vs. Illinois, Matt
Mann Pool, 3 p.m.
U-M Physical Therapy Dept.: Wheel-
chair basketball game, Crisler Arena, 8
p.m.
International Students Assoc.: Ger-
man night, Rive Gauche, 1024 Hill, 8
p.m.
Placement
U.N. Translators, must be active speak-
er of French, and have attended univ.
where teaching in French will also
be required to translate into some other
official languages of UN from French
and Engl. (Spanish, Russian, and Chin-
ese); a plus if proficient in ot h e r
languages. Tests given March 18, and
19, N.Y.. Montreal, Paris, Geneva, Brus-
sels, and Vienna. Apply immediately,
address on letter at Career Planning.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.A.B.
Announcements: for details, call 764-
74601or stop in.
EXAMINATION for Summer Jobs in
Federal Agencies: open to students eli-
gible to take test on the Grade Point
System until Mar. 13; applications are
available at SPS.
Cook County Dept. of Public Aid,
Chicago, Summer Trainee Program in
Social work announced for sophomores
and juniors; applications at SPS.
Human Resources Center, social serv.
work for grad. and undergrad. students
in nursing, occupational and physical
therapy, psychology, public health, re-
habilitation, education, recreation, soc-
iology and related fields; applica-
tions available at SPS.
Abraham & Straus, Brooklyn, N.Y. as-
signments in area of sales, customer
service, sales supervision, comparison
shopping and merchandising.

4

WORSHIP

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State of Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536'
Wesley-668-6881
Dr Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m.-Family Worship-Race Relations
Sunday. Contemporary Service- Theme:
Children of God.
1 1:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Kendall Cowing:
"The Age of Aquarius."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 a.m. to noon."
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sundav. Feb. 14:
5:30 p.m.-Celebration, Wesley Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Dinner, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program-Environment, Wesley
Lounge.
Thursday. Feb. 18:
12 noon-Luncheon Discussion-"Layman As
a Live Option"-Pine Room.
Friday. Feb. 1 9:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion-"The His-
toric Church."
7:00 p.m.-Meet at Wesley Foundation for
party at IM Building.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m. --Sermon: "The God of Our
Trouble."
6:00 p.m. -- Sermon: "Zechariah and the
Comfortable Pew."
Guest minister-Mr. Bill DeVries, Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship, Staff, Wayne State
Universty.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Camous-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and i1:00 a.m. -
"Facing the Anxieties of Life," Rev. Terry
N. Smith.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Sermon by
Mr. Sanders.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Readina Room. 306 E. Liberty St. -

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11:00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held
at YM-YWCA, 350 South Fifth Ave.-Ron
Johnson.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study and Prayer Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prayer
and Counseling, also, 12 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
Daily Word, published at Unity Village, is
available.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Holy Communion.
11 :00 a.m.-Matins.
1 :00 p.m.-Free-form Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.

II

I

AUSTIN
DIAMOND

1209 5. University

663-7151

I

Join The
r

Daily

I

the U of M Physical Therapy & M Clubs Present
C.S. Mott Children's Hospital Benefit
Wheelchair Basketball Game
featuring the
DETROIT SPARKS
WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL GAME

*Of

AID

Feb. 13-8:00 p.m.

Crisler Arena

$1.00

__....__

BEAVER C(
VIENNA SE

11

AID is a referral agency organized for the purpose of offering
abortion and family planning information in order to relieve the
frustration too frequently encountered in these crises. We refer
men and women upon request to other agencies or qualified in-
dividuals whose facilities meet all medical guidelines for the pur-
pose of professional guidance in the fields of birth control, steril-
ization, contraception, and artificial insemination. All inquiries
are kept strictly confidental. We offer 24-hour, 7-day a week
servce. For further information, contact us at 1-313-964-4445.

LLEGE
MINAR

1w

11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion with Slides and
Music and Poetry and The Prophet Amos.
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF
.....n V A ' E A . k .'.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheios, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Services,
with Communion at 9:30.
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Bible Study, "Romans."

JUNE 14-AUGUST 23, 1971
An Intensive Study of Modern Southeast Europe
In co-operation with the Austro-American Institute of Education,
an unusual opportunity to study and observe current dynamics of
chanae within the communist-dominated countries of Southeast

3s .

ABORTION REPEAL
Write your state legislator about the need

I

.I

11

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