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February 13, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"Roadsides on a Merry-Go-Round"
deals with the philosophies of Dietrich Bonhoef-
fer, Teilhard de Chardin and Martin Buber
Sunday at 6:45
NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

page three

T4r

irl 't ttn

iluity

NEWS PHONE: 764.055'
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, February 13, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

briefs
n e W SBy The Asocaed Pess

I

w

CINEMA II
A VALENTINE SPECIAL
"KING OF HEARTS"
with Alan Bates, Genevieve Bujold

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

7 & 9:05 p.m.

PLUS
"A' TASTE OF HONEY"
with Rita Tushingham
FRIDAY & SATURDAY-11 p.m.
SUNDAY-1 & 3 p.m.
February 12, 13, 14
Auditorium A, Angell Hall-75c
SEPARATE ADMISSION FOR EACH SHOWING
NEXT WEEK: "Birthday Party"
Screenplay by Harold Pinter

SEN. EDMUND MUSKIE (D-Maine) said yesterday he plans
hearings on threats of plant closings and worker layoffs by in-
dustries trying to avoid expensive antipollution controls.
Muskie made his announcement after being assured the Union
Carbide Corp., which is under a federal antipollution order, will "nev-
er engage in any economic or environmental blackmail."
Union Carbide has said it might have to lay off 625 workers at
its Marietta, Ohio plant to meet an order from the Environmental
Protection Agency to reduce fly ash and sulphur oxide emissions by
April 1972.
* * *
BLACK PANTHER DEFENSE MINISTER Huey P. Newton
is living in Oakland, California under an assumed name in an ex-
clusive top-floor $650 a month apartment overlooking a lake, the
San Francisco Examiner said yesterday.
The black militant's Lakeshore Drive apartment is lavishly furn-
ished and the one-year lease includes such services as a full-timej
do or man, sauna, gymnasium and putting green, the newspaper said.'
Newton and other Panther leaders could not be reached for com-
ment yesterday.

U.S. rep. blasts
appointments to
;new mine panel
WASHINGTON (A) - Rep. Ken Hechler (D-W. Va.) urged
yesterday the firing of Undersecretary of the Interior Fred
J. Russell for making what Hechler termed illegal appoint-
ments of unqualified "political hacks" to a mine safety tech-
nical panel.
Hechler asked President Nixon to request the immediate
resignation of Russell and of some members of the new Ad-
visory Committee on Coal Mine Safety Research who, he said,
do not meet the legal requirement that they be "knowledge-
able in the field of coal mine --- - -
safety research." - -,

A move is also underway to rally J v ~
congressmen in a bipartisan law-a uf
suit to sue the executive branch
because of the appointments.
-Associated Press "Some of the congressmen, Re retu rnpr a
Huey i posh apartment? speechless at these appointments,"

d AL
' ? c.niA /'Snv. > CfnTTawc. n. nnc..- nin+.. ..f I

I

"A JACK THE RIPPER TYPE STORY. .
with a twist! -William Wolf, Cue

THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION proposed new
labeling rules yesterday to encourage the use of iodized salt which
helps combat throat disfiguring goiters.
The administration also took steps toward requiring manufac-
turers to indicate prominently on salt labels whether the product
contains iodide, a component necessary for the human diet.
The Salt Institute. representing nearly all manufacturers, said
through a spokesman that its members oppose the labeling change.
* * *
THE AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department released a report
yesterday that says a rising glut of imported foreign goods is
worsening this country's highest unemployment in 14 years.
Heavy imports of textiles, leather goods, rubber, electronic com-
ponents, and a host of other products have eliminated hundreds of
thousands of jobs in the United States, the report said.
* * *

Black Panther Defense Minister Huey Newton leaves the plush
Oakland apartment where he reportedly lives under an assumed
name. The San Francisco Examiner said yesterday Newton goes
under the name Don Penn in the $650 a month apartment. See
News Briefs, at left.
SALES DOWN-
Detergent makers
remnoving enzymes

said uary Sellers, an associate oI
public interest lawyer Ralph Na-
der.
However, Russell could not be
reached yesterday for comment.
Among those Russell appointed
as "knowledgeable in the field of
coal mine safety research" were:C
-Jo Ann Gray, of Denver, a
former airline stewardess whose
mother's family included s o m e
miners.
-Sara Abernathy of Altus,
Okla., a onetime fine arts student
whose late husband was a doctor
specializing in eye, ear, nose and
throat ailments.
-Robert Ziems, a Washington,

PALE1TINE GUERRILLA chief Yasir Arafat announced Detergent makers are reportedly gun producing an enzyme f r e e patent tradtemark antitrust
yesterday what he labeled as a new plot by the Jordanian gov- removing enzymes from some of Tide. lawyer.
ernment to wipe out the commando movement. their laundry products due to a Spokesmen insisted there is no -Ben Chastian of Birmingham,
Arafat appealed to the Arab world "to shoulder your responsibil- loss of sales. evidence that enzyme detergents a chemistry professor with no re-
ities toward our people." Industry officials blame the are any more hazardous than reg- ported experience with mining.
* lower sales volume on consumer ular detergents. -William Carlson, Wyoming
THE APOLLO ASTRONAUTS began talking with experts confusion over the safety of en- The move comes as the Federal University president specializing
yesterday in Houston about their lunar excursions. zyie stain removers. Trade Commission continues a in radiation and veterinary medi-
Industry spokesmen confirmed year-long investigation of enzyme cine, whose Senate sponsor has
Astronauts Alan Shepard, Stuart Roosa and Edgar Mitchell went the cutback on enzymes after a !aety. The FT onside stated in writing th'at he has no
into the isolation of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory yesterday New York official had disclosed a petition that would outlaw en- experience in coal mining.
morning, that Procter & Gamble has be- zymes in detergents.i -H. Lynne Barber of Cincin-

~Remember 'PSYCHO'?
There are scenes with that
kind of impact! Worth see-
-ABC-TV

LANSING ACTION
Students draft antiSST *bills

Definitely in The Hitchcock Traditem
COLOR M

STARTS WEDNESDAY: ANDY WARHOL'S "TRASH"
ao F IFTHForuJm
_ PTH AVENUO At LIU. T
DOWNTOWN' ANN ARBOR
NIORMATION 761-6700

SNEAK
PREVIEW
TONIGHT AT 9:00 ONLY!
A complete showing of a new movie by
Louis Bunuel featuring his star in Belle
du Jour, Catherine Deneuve.

SAT.
Bird-3 :06
Bird-5:00
Bird-7:00
Sneak-9:00
Bird-10:45
SUN.
Bird only
at
3:00, 5:00,
7:00, 9:00

A bill that would prohibit the
supersonic transport (S S T)
from flying or landing in the
state is being drafted by a group
of four University law students
and one engineering student.
A second bill being drafted by
the group, all members of the
Environmental L a w Society
(ELS), would establish noise
limits at all non-military air-
ports in the state, which could
in effect ban the SST f r o -m
Michigan.
Both bills are expected to be
introduced to the state legisla-
ture early next week by Rep.
David Serotkin (R-Mount Cle-
mens).
The controversial bill prohib-
iting overflights by supersonic
jets stands less chance of pass-

ing than the bill setting noise
limits, according to John Watts,
a second year law student who
heads the ELS.
Watts suggests t h a t airline
companies, who stand to lose
the business SST flights in
Michigan would supply, are like-
ly to contest the b i1 in the
courts, should it pass the legis-
lature, on the grounds that it
interferes with interstate com-
merce.
Serotkin says he hopes to cre-
ate a test case for the U.S. Su-
preme Court based on the claim
that noise and atmosphere pol-
lution by the planes would be
harmful to the health of the
state's citizens and property.
The second bill would set a
noise limit of 108 decibels on
planes at the state's commer-
cial airports. Watts notes that
most conventional jets are able
to meet this limit.

Although it is a matter of
speculation how much noise the
SST would generate, environ-
mentalists say the SST's noise
level would go far above the
proposed limit.
Similar noise controls have al-
ready been established in Cali-
fornia and are under consider-
ation in New York, despite op-
position from the Federal Avia-
tion Administration.
Another group of students, ac-
tive in Fly America's Super Son-
ic Transport (FASST), is seek-
ing to appear before the legis-
lature to oppose the new bills
and "set the record straight" on
the SST controversy.
FASST charges that most of
the criticism of the SST has
been based on "fuzzy thinking,
exaggeration and out-and-out
misrepresentation."

The American Academy of Al-
lergy, which recently declared de-
tergent enzymes a "potential dan-
ger to public health" has present-
ed to industry and government of-
ficials a blueprint for a proposed
study to determine the safety of'
enzymes.
Enzymes are chemicals which
are present in all living things and
speed up chemical reactions, such
as the digestion of food.
In detergents, the enzymes,
which speed up chemical reac-
tions, break down certain stains
so the regular washing process
can remove them.
Scientists in England and the
United States have discovered
that workers in the enzyme in-
dustry have developed respiratory
illness from the enzymes.
Both government agencies and
detergent makers have received
complaints from consumers who
said they developed skin rashes
from immersing their hands in
laundry water or wearing clothes
washed in enzyme detergents.
The FTC alone reported receiv-
ing over 200 complaints of aller-
gic reactions.

nati, a "retired mining executive"
whose business was actually sand,
gravel and retail coal.
The former stewardess, the doc-
tor's widow and the patent lawyer
were involved in Republican party
politics, and the stewardness and
her husband are close friends of
Russell.
Interior Department spokesmen
said they do not know whether the
others were politically active.
Two other appointees certified
as knowledgeable about mine saf-
ety were a vice president of Con-
solidation Coal Co., whose No. 9
mine at Farmington, W. Va., ex-
ploded in November 1968, killing
78 men; and a representative of
Cargill, Inc., owner of a Louis-
iana salt mine where fire killed
21 men in March 1968.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

quake site
LOS ANGELES (MP)-Thousand.
of families received word yester-
day that they can return to homes
evacuated after Tuesday's earth-
quake cracked the dam of t h e
city's largest reservoir, creating
fears of a rupture.
Mayor Sam Yorty said four days
of pumping had lowered the wa-
ter level to just slightly above the
safety level, and an estimated 80,-
000 persons ordered out of a 20
square-mile area could return at
4 p.m.
The death toll from the devas-
tating shock stood at 61 yesterday.
Forty-two victims were pulled
from the rubble of a collapsed vet-
erans hospital, where two patients
and two employes were still miss-
ing last night and feared dead.
One man was pulled alive from
the ruins late Thursday, a day af-
ter workers had given up on find-
ing more survivors.
A strong aftershock did not fur-
ther weaken the dam at Van Nor-
man Lakes before the water drop-
ped to a safe level. T h e initial
shock crumpled the concrete fac-
ing and created, fissures in the
main bulwark of packed earth.
By yesterday morning 'pumping
had reduced the level of the up-
per reservoir by 18 feet and the
lower reservoir by 12. There were
four billion gallons of drinking
water in the lower reservoir when
the quake struck.
Scores had been rescued from
the wreckage of the hospital in
the first two days after the quake
but hope had been abandoned for
others when Frank Carbonera, a
kitchen worker, was found under
a huge concrete slab, orotected by
a metal tub.
In the hard hit west end of the
San Fernando Valley, close to the
quake's center, m a n y neighbor-
hoods in the communities of Syl-
mar, Granada Hills, Mission Hills
and Porter Ranch continued with-
out water due to broken mains or
wrecked wells.
With temperatures around 90
degrees, residents lined up at tank
trucks parked in strategic loca-
tions with signs saying "One Gal-
lon of Water Per Family Please."

t
- --- ------ ---

I

r

RC PLAYERS presents-
THE FROGS
an original play for children
SAT., Feb. 13-10 A.M. & 2 P.M.
SUN., Feb. 14-2 P.M.

i

11

East Quad Aud.

Admission 50c

!GINMA
Sat., Sun.-Feb. 13, 14
GREED
dir. ERICH VON STROHEIM (1925)
Zosu Pitts and her husband dentist fall from finan-
cial heights because of their GREED. A movie with a
message.
"GREED unquestionably contains the fullest depic-
tion of Stroheimian underworld and the most intense
contrast between extremes of innocence and de-
generacy.
Stroheim, Joel Finler
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

WITH

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