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February 11, 1971 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A
February 1 1, 1971

Thursday, I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, February 11, 1971

Deaths, damage
mount following
LAeathquakeNo"A
LOS ANGELES ( - The toll of dead continued to rise
and propetrty damage mounted into the hundreds of millions
yesterday as Southern California' continued to quiver from
aftershocks of Tuesday's devastating earthquake.
Workers searched the ruins of a veterans hospital where
the bodies of 27 patients and employes had been found. They.
said 13 persons still are missing,
In all, authorities tallied 46 deaths, nine by heart attack.
More than 1,000 persons were injured.
Fears of a rupture in the cracked dam of the city's
largest reservoir eased as the water level fell, due to draining.
The 80,000 persons evacuated from the area were not allowed
to return but officials said only'a powerful new shock could
" cause trouble.

Conference
Treaty 'su
(Continued from Page 1)
tions on college campuses.
Thus, many of the people who at-
tended the conference desired to
discuss ways to tailor implemen-
tation of the treaty to the needs of
their own particular region.
In this context, by the time the
May Day proposal was considered
Sunday afternoon, many of the
conference delegates had already
Those leaving generally said they
were leaving only because if they
r stayed longer they would be late
getting home and not because they
were angry or disgusted with the
conference.
However, it is significant that so
many people apparently considered
May Day inconsequential enough
to leave it to discussion among,
only those who favored it.
Ec~athy The people who attended the
S meetings though the conference
was worthwhile because it gave
them the opportunity to discuss the
treaty with other interested people
from around the country.
They said the success of regional
organizing around the treaty would.
ultimately determine whether May
Day would be anything more than
a "one shot" proposal.
Despite this attitude, there was
le court- still considerable interest in May
Day. There were 700 people at the
Indiana May Day caucus and about 1,000
hed and people attended the final portion
ding, but of Sunday's plenary where the May
inutes. Day proposal was approved.
in Laird This basic conflict - between
front of those primarily interested in pro-
r as 500 grams of national implementation
the Uni- I such as May Day and those inter-
ested in discussing regional or-
stud judiciary
1) unanimity in jury decisions-in-
1rli n ti ri n c dun mtirrm;

on Peace
!cessfu1'
ganizing-was further complicated
by time limitations imposed on the
conference and the fact that the
conference was moving toward a
final plenary session where na-
tional programs would be ap-
proved.
Many of the caucuses and meet-
ings seemed almost to be pervaded
by the need to accomplish anything
concrete, regardless of its ulti-
mate value.
However, much of the disunity
manifested at the conference was
generated simply because the con-
ference was a body of organizeis
from diverse areas and with dif-
fering politics, trying to cope with
a situation which was lesa than
ideal.
Whether the attempt to revive
the peace movement as empha-
sized by the student-youth confer-
ence last weekend, will achieve
the harmony of purpose it needs to
succeed, however, will not really
become evident until it expands
from simply a movement of or-
ganizers to a genuine movement of
the people.
For the student body:
Genuine
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HRD firing
questioned
(Continued from Page 1)
tions to reconsider the actions
which have taken place."
Louis Belcher, Republican can-
didate for mayor, said last night,
"I think that the best judge of
any employe's ability is his super-
visor. . . In view of Mr. Hunter's
past escapades at school board
meetings, any other city employe
would have been fired."
Ezra Rowry, chairman of the
Model Cities policy board, called,
the firing of Hunter "one of the
most racist and overt acts of dis-
crimination ever recalled in City
Hall. . . It was racist primarily
because (City Administrator Guy)
Laredm cannot stand a black man;
with guts, integrity and real social
principles." '1
Councilman Robert Faber (D-
2nd Ward) said last night that
this was "absolutely not a political
firing inspired by City Hall." He
called Slaughter "a capable man,"
speculating that "evidently Mr.
Slaughter and Mr. Hunter did not
get along well."

Vice President Spiro Agnew, sent,
here for consultations and an in-
spection tour after President Nix-
on declared California a disaster
area, arrived via helicopter to look
at hard-hit areas with Gov. Ron-
ald Reagan and Mayor Sam Yorty.
Attention centered on the Veter-
ans Administration hospital at
Sylmar in the west end of the San
Fernando Valley just 10 miles
from the quake's center. Some 250
workmen probed the steel and con-
crete rubble of two collapsed
three-story ward buildings.
Well over 100 patients and em-
ployes were inside when the 6:01
a.m. tremor shook the 45-year-old
structure apart. Scores were in-
jured and additional scores trap-
ped. For nearly 24 hours moans
and cries came from victims trap-
ped alive. Many injured were ex-
tricated and flown by helicopter to
other hospitals.
Authorities said there was little
chance of additional survivors.
Aftershocks by the hundreds
emanated from the region of the
quake's center in the San Gabriel
Mountains 26 miles northwest.
A dozen or more fairly strongj
ones kept the area jiggling yes-
terday but caused no new dam-
age. Magnitudes of the stronger
shocks were around 5 on the Rich-
ter scale, compared with 6.6 for
the first.

4

All ages protest the war TryM
Invasion proteste,
on college cam pu~

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of

i

March protestmig Laos
actions draws 4,000

(Continued from Page 1)
were arrested and several injuries,
both of demonstrators and police,
were reported.
At the University of Wisconsin
there was a rally drawing 1,500
protesters. From the rally, the
demonstrators went to the Social
Science Bldg. and occupied it.
Ten people were arrested, but
last night students were reported-
ly still in the building.
On the Boston Commons, about
4,000 demonstrators g a t h e r e d
peacefully and listened to speech-
es. From the Commons, the crowd
marched to Copley Square, dwin-
dling to about 1,000 as they con-;
tinued on to Northeastern Uni-
versity.
At Northeastern, a Harvard
Crimson reporter said, windows of
a ROTC truck were smashed and
riot police came. There may have.
been a few arrests, he said.
Between 150-200 students en-
tered and shut down Stanford
University's co puter center,
charging it was doing war-related
research.
In Washington, 2,000-2,500 pro-
testers from college and anti-war
groups in the area marched on
the White House.
In New York City about 2,500
persons gathered at Times Square
to protest the war and then,
marched on to Rockefeller Center,
several blocks away. No trouble
was reported.
At the University of Washing-
ton 1,500 people rallied for an hour
and a half. At Ohio State Univer-
sity a rally and march were held
attracting 50-60 people. About 200
people gathered on the New Haven
Green at Yale and then marched
by military recruiting stations,
shouting anti-war slogans.
About 1,000 people including
many veterans rallied at the Uni-
versity of New Mexico and 500
protesters marched from the Uni-

versity of Minnesota to thi
house.
At the University of
700 demonstrators march
took over the ROTC build
left peacefully after 25 m:
Defense Secretary Melv
was burned in effigy in
an army recruiting cente
protesters marched fromt
versity of Illinois.
Reoents t
(Continued from Page

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plans proposed by various faculty cudng ecisionsa etermining gui
groups on campus as well as judi- and punishment.
cial systems on other university According to a source closet
campuses. the Regents, "The big proble:
The proposed judiciary provides with the proposed plan is tt
for an all-student jury to decide unanimity clause. If Student Go'
guilt and punishment in cases ernment Council refuses to ba(
w h e r e students are defendants, down on that point we could ha'
Trials would be presided over by troubles."
an outside legal expert, along with SGC has said the unanimi
student and f a c u 1 t y associate provision is "essential if we aret
judges. accept the judiciary's proposal."
Last month, Senate Assembly- Although SGC has not endors
the faculty representative body-. the proposed University-wide ji
approved the proposed judiciary, diciary, it has agreed to go alon
but urged several changes in the with the plan "in the interestsc
plan. A major criticism by Assem- all segments of the Universi
bly was the requirement for community."

lt
to
m
he
Iv-
ck
,ve
ty
to
eed
u-
ng
of
[ty

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

il,

I

.s ' ..
.S . . . . . . .

OPEN MON., THURS., FRI. NIGHTS 'TIL 9:00

(Continued frorh Page 1)
A permit was granted to the
marchers by the city Tuesday,
authorizing them to walk along
the right side of the street along
the route to City Hall.
The participants assembled at
the Diag at about 4:30 p.m. and
heard an organizer of the march
U.S. troops
enter Laos
(Continued from Page 1)
taken," said a spokesman. "They
are operating only on the Vietnam
side of the border."
Meanwhile, in Cambodia, the
drive by 10,000 South Vietnamese
troops with full TU.S. air support
continued, as the allied forces
clashed at four points with North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops.
In Phnom Penh, a battle raged
all night around Cambodian navy
headquarters on the Mekong River,
but details were unavailable be-
cause Cambodian sailors openeda
fire at newsmen who tried to ap-
proach. None was reported in-
jured. Naval guards said they were
acting on orders from the base
commander.
Both the Cambodian and Laos
drives are directed at cutting off
the Ho Chi Minh trail, the route
used by the North Vietnamese to
transport troops and supplies into
South Vietnam.
The landing force of 1,500 U.S.
Marines was armed with artillery
and tanks and placed off South
Vietnam's northern coast on ships
of the American 7th Fleet.
While their reported reason for
deployment was to counter a pos-
sible North Vietnamese thrust in
retaliation for the Laos incursion,
there was speculation that the
landing force was linked to Ky's
announcement of a possible inva-
sion of North Vietnam.
The U.S. Command said it would
have no comment.

urge them not to commit any
violence during the demonstration.
Amidst a multitude of flags and
banners, they began walking north
on State St., the size of the crowd
growing 'as the march moved
along.
Although the crowd consisted
mainly of students, Mayor Robert
Harris and several City Council-
men also took part in the march.
Other participants included some
University professors and people
from the Ann Arbor community.
The marchers, filling the street,
turned west on Liberty St. as traf-
fic on side streets was blocked off
by policemen. The march contin-
ued north on Main St., and turned
on to Ann St. from where the
marchers entered the City Hall
parking lot.
Marchers climbed to the balcony
of City Hall, and unrolled banners
criticizing U.S. involvement in
Southeast Asia.
An organizer of the event told the
crowd that the march was a dem-
onstration of solidarity with the
Vietnamese people.
Barbara Fuller, coordinator of
the Interfaith Council for Peace, in-
formed the crowd that a telegram
will be sent to President Nixon,
Senators Philip Hart and Robert
Griffin, and Congressman Marvin
Esch late tomorrow. She said the
telegram expresses "outrage" at
the "widening of the war under the
guise of withdrawal," and de-
mands immediate, total withdrawal
of all American forces in Southeast
Asia.
The demonstrators then agreed
to meet in the Union Ballroom at
7 p.m. to organize further action.
In a wide-ranging discussion, the
meeting last night debated political
philosophy as well as specific pro-
posals for action.
At one point there were over 21
proposals on the floor for consider-
ation. Many participants left thel
meeting at that time, expressing
dismay at the confusion.

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COMMITTEES:
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Contemporary MUSKET
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Canterbury
sit-in ends
(Continued from Page 1)
"Black people are saying take
the investments out of Indochina
and South Africa and reallocate
the money to those who are at-
tempting to establish an economi-
cal base with which to deal with
poverty in this country", Thomas
said.
He sees the money from Canter-
bury House as a recognition by the
church of "what they have done
to blacks, through dehumaniza-
'tion, slavery, and poverty," a n d
now, he added, "they are begin-
ning to pay."
Although the funds represent
only one per cent of the $1 mil-
lion BEDL-WRO is asking from
Canterbury House's trustees over
the next 10 years, Thomas said the
action is a "very healthy begin-
ning."
, He explained that his organiza-
tion will "continue to press its de-
mands to all the churches until
they are met."
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