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February 09, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-09

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Tuesday, February 9, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Gilmore,

DROP TWO AT TECH
Dolp h sBeleagured icers weather stormy

drub

Iu u

TU

lowly

By The Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE - Artis Gil-
more reached into his bag of tal-y
ents for a super performance and
led sixth-ranked Jacksonville to
a 111-93 victory over Loyola of
S It was the 10th straight for the sot
Jacksonville Dolphins, who kept NIGHT EDITOR:
their nation-le'ading scoring aver- BETSY MAHON
age .above the 100 mark.
The 7-foot-2 Gilmore scored 24
points, pulled in eo ference basketball victory o v e r
blocked 11 shots before going to Mississippi State.
the bench with five minutes left The league-leading Wildcats
n the clock. held a four-point lead with 14:30
Loyola's Tyrone Barioneaux, a remaining.
seven-footed, scored 12 of his State tried a full-court press
points after Gilmore left the game. and three fast passes gave J i m

.4oyola
MANHATTAN. Kan. - A goal-,
tending call against Kansas
State's Davie Hall with 11 seconds
left gave Oklahoma State an up-
set 51-50 victory over the Wild-
cats in Big Eight basketball last
night.'
The Coyboys, winless in six con-
ference games, took a 41-37 lead
with about 10 minutes remain-
ing and went into a freeze.
As time ran out, K-State's Ernie
Kusnyer missed a 35-footer,Eand
the Cowgoys grabbed the rebound
and held the ball to the buzzer.
The lead changed hands 12
times during the game. Kansas
State held a 31-30 advantage at
halftime.
Rebels lose
KNOXVILLE-Tennessee limit-,
ed Johnny Neumann, the nation's
leading scorer, to a season's low of
22 points last night in beating
Mississippi 80-74 in a Southeast-
ern Conference basketball game.
Neumann, who went into the
game with a 41.3 average, was held
to 19 floor shots by a special box-
and-one defense devised by Vol-
unteer Coach Ray Mears. The
Rebels' sophomore connected ona
11.
* *

By JOEL GREER
The Michigan icers lost all the
way around this past weekend.
Not only did they lose b o t h
games of the series to the Mich-
igan Tech Huskies, they had to
suffer through a 14-hour bus ride
to reach the Houghton Winter
¢b° Carnival.
Due to the cancellation of all
plane flights to the Upper Penin-
sula city, the Wolverines spent
part of Thursday and all of Fri-
day bussing their way through
one of the winter's worst blizzards.
Arriving just before game-time,
the Wolverines obviously weren't
ready to take on the high-flying

Ernie Fleming led the winners
with 26 points. Bobby Dissant was
high for Loyola with 23.
* * *
Wildcats romp
LEXINGTON - Eighth-ranked
Kentucky snapped out of"its dol-
drums in the second half last night1
for a 102-83 Southeastern Con-.

Andrews the ball for Kentucky
alone under the basket.
Seconds later Larry Steele pick-
ed off a State pass to make it
65-50.
State's Jack Bouldin took scor-
ing honors witli 34 points.
Tom Parker led Kentucky's at-
tack with 32 points, 23 of them in
the second half.

Jayhawks triumph
LAWRENCE, Kan.-Mark Wil-
liams wrecked Colorado's defense
last night as fifth-ranked Kansas
beat Colorado 91-67 in a Big Eight
Conference basketball game.
The 5-foot-11 sophomore came
off the bench in the first half and
scored a career high of 22 points,
including 10 field goals in 14 shots.
The Big Eight leaders threw a
tight ring around high scoring
Cliff Meely who still scored a
game-high 25 points.
The Jayhawks opened the gap
to a 38-26 halftime score, then
broke the game open increasing
the lead to 20 points.
Scores
NBA
Milwaukee 118, Phoenix 94
ABA
Floridians 106, Pittsburgh 97
College Basketball
Notre Dame 93, Butler 81
N. Mich. 83, Minnesota (Duluth) 74
Air Force 81, Portland 62
Virginia Tech 81, William & Mary 63
Oklahoma State 51, Kansas State 50
Youngstown 76, Hillsdale 53
Clemson 77, Rollins 52
Furman 83, Wofford 62
Vanderbilt 92, Florida 81
Florida A&M 103, Savannah State 97
Dayton 63, Western Kentucky 60
Utah State 103, Tulane 81
St. Louis 76. Wichita State 71
Southern 94, Prairie View 88
Georgia 71, Alabama 70

i
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t
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y
7
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--Daily-Terry Mccarthy
BRIAN SLACK (8) takes a point blank shot against Michigan State. His attempt was thwarted by
State goalie Jim Watt but Slack managed two goals in the week-end series with Michigan Tech.
His efforts were for naught however as the Wolverines dropped both games, 5-2 and 7-2.
EYE BIG TENS:
masts show improvement

Alumni triumph
Michigan's varsity t e n n i s
team fell victim to a fired up
group of Alumni racketeers
Saturday as they could manage
only three wins in the first six
singles matches and the three
doublesicontests.hAltogether
nine singles match-ups took
place with the varsity taking
two of them.
The most exciting match of
the afternoon came when Tim
Ott and alumnus Harry Fau-
quier played to a three set
marathon in number two singles
which included three tie break-
ers.
Huskies. But the spirited Wolver-
ines gave it all they had through
the first two periods leaving the
ice tied 1-1 with 20 minutes re-
maining.
The lack of stamina finally ap-
peared at the beginning of t h e
final stanza as Michigan T e c h
broke the game wide open.
Ranked number one in the na-
tion by a poll coming out of Madi-
son, Wisconsin, the Huskies put on
an excellent display of sharp pass-
ing and quick skating.
The onslaught began at the 18
second mark as Toronto senior
Ken Tucker put the Huskies in the
lead for good after taking a pass
from freshman forward Gary
Crosby. Tech put the game away
with two more tallies before the
half-way mark of the period as
the long drawn-out trip took its
toll on the weary Wolverines.,
Merle Falk and Punch Cartier
scored for the Wolverines but it
wasn't enough as the Huskies beat
Michigan goalie Karl Bagnell four
times in the final period giving
the Huskies a 5-2 victory.
"We Just didn't have the

journey,
strength after the second period,"
explained Michigan's Rick Mal-
1 e t t e before Saturday's game,
"We all ran out of gas at the
same time."
A well rested Michigan team
took the ice Saturday but the re-
sults were nearly the same. Mich-
igan got both goals from Brian
Slack but the Huskies had anoth-
er four-goal third period to win
this time, 7-2.
The second straight victory gave
the Huskies the Governor's Cup
on the basis of their two-game
12-4 total goal victory.
Michigan goalie Bill B u s c h
made his first start of the season
Saturday and looked extremely
sharp during most of the contest,
except for his shaky start at the
game's beginning. Michigan Tech
scored twice in the 'opening two
minutes before Slack brought
Michigan within one at 7:22.
The Huskies regained a two-
goal advantage with a little over
four minutes remaining in t h e
opening period on defenseman Jim
Nahrgang's "gift" goal. Both
Nahrgang and Crosby broke over
the Michigan line and Nahrgang
dropped a pass to Crosby who
pulled up about 30 feet shy of the
net.
Crosby's shot from there w a s
neatly kicked out by Busch but
the rebound ricocheted straight
back into the net off of N a h r-
gang's pads who had continued in
for the rebound.
Slack tightened the Tech lead to
one at 4:46 of the final period as
he slid a backhand shot just in-
side the right goalpost.
Less than two minutes later, the
Huskies began another four-goal
barrage as Mike Usitalo scored his
second of the night on a power
play at 6:14.
From then on its was all Mich-
igan Tech as Gary Scriver,
Graham Wise and Lorne Stamler
added third period goals to com-
plete the series sweep. The last two
goals came only eight seconds
apart.
a WCHA Standings

By BETSY MAHON

The Michigan gymnasts began
their current season on a note of
cautious optimism. They had lost
such stalwart performers as Ron
Rapper, Sid Jensen, George Hunt-
zicher and Bill Machie, but at the
same time standouts such as Rick
McCurdy and Dick Kaziny were
returning along with a group of
highly touted but untested fresh-
men.
Now, with the season at its half-
way point Coach Newt Loken finds
that his "young and growing"
squad is "progressing nicely". The
fact that the team has scored
higher at each successive meet is
an "indication of the hard work
and hustle" on the part of all
team members.
The gymnasts began their sea-
son by participating in the Mid-
west Open where they made a

creditable showing with 155.75
points Loken admitted at the time
that "It.is evident that we must
make considerable improvement if
we wish to regain the prominence
we held last year." At that meet
Iowa State, the Wolverines' chief
gymnastic rival scored 163.5.
Then the Wolverines entered
the Big Ten Invitational which
they completely dominated, pick-
ing up two first place finishes
more than any of the other nine
competing teams.
In their first dual meet of the
season the, gymnasts romped to
a 160.7 to 138.0 decision o v e r
Western Michigan. The strongest
event of the night proved to be
the long horse where Ray Gura
posted a 9.3 and Rick McCurdy
and Terry Boys tied at 9.1. The
Wolverines performed well on the
high bar but the parallel bars
event turned into a disaster as no
one managed to score above an
8.60..
'The Michigan squad completely
controlled a meet with neighbor-
ing rival Eastern Michigan, out-
pointing them 163.7 to 138.0.
diana State and Iowa the Wolver-
ines again proved dominant as
ines again proved dominant as
they defeated Indiana State 163.85
to 162.35 and Iowa 163.85 to 158.2.

-Associated Press
*KENTUCKY'S TOM PARKER (12) leaps high and scores despite
the presence of Mississippi State defender Malcolm Wesson (42).
The eighth ranked Wildcats triumphed easily to maintain their
lead in the Southeastern Conference race.
Ifoope Pickings
OK let's hear it for Randy "the Greek" Lott whose phenomenal
mastery of probabilities has gained him one free bowling game at the
Union for himself and a guest, plus, yes plus, one tatalizing Cottage
Inn pizza guaranteed to make the gods turn their noses up at ambrosia.
"Lucky Larry" as his friends call him will no doubt welcome all
4tters of congratulations. In fact he'd probably welcome any kind at
all. That's beside the point. Don't scoff at his miraculous revelations of
last week. His feat is surely worthy of congratulations. After all, how
often is it that you are able to eat Cottage Inn pizza? Let me phrase
that differently. How often is it that you are able to stomach Cottage
Inn pizza?
This is a great moment in Randy's life. Let us not forget it.
member what Harvey Bodansky said earlier this year: "You too
an win a free pizza and bowling game by sending in your Hoope
Pickings to 420 Maynard by midnight Friday."

Bobby Hull leaves hospital;
Russians capture ski event
By The Associated Press
" CHICAGO - Bobby Hull of the Chicago Black Hawks was
released from a hospital early yesterday after x-rays proved negative.
He was injured Sunday night in a National Hockey League game
against the Pittsburgh Penguins.
Hull was hurt after scoring the 544th goal of his career, tying
Maurice Richard for second place in NHL career goals.
Hospital attendants said there were no fractures in his right
hip and right elbow.

points. However, the long horse
which was a strong event earlier in
the season, went to pieces as the
Wolverines managed only a 26.75.
The parallel bars event, a con-
tinuing source of concern, was
able to score only 26.60.
While all the events have had
their strong moments at one time
during the season, the trick seems
to be having all the events score
well in the same meet. The weak-
est event continues to be the par-
allel bars where the performers
"must improve to score 27 points
consistently."
Loken feels that the steady im-
provement is a "fine tribute to the
entire squad who are trying to
repeat as the Big Ten Champ-
ions." Besides the optional rou-
tines this year's Big Ten Champ-
ionships will include the compul-
sory Olympic routines. The scores
on these compulsory routines will
be added to the regular scores to
determine which team will repre-
sent the Big Ten in the NCAA
Championships.
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
'A Farah
Wright
' Tads
* Sebring
CHECKMATE

III _

MICHIGAN........4 12 0

l I[!'

W L T
Tech ........ .......14 1 0
Denver...........8 6 0
Duluth .............9 9 0
MSU ............. 7 70
North Dakota.......9 9 0
Wisconsin .......... 7 7 0
Colorado...........5 8 0
Minnesota.........6 10 0

Pct.
.933
.571
.500
.500
.500
.500
.385
.375
.250

Over the past week end t h e
bouncers posted their highest
point total of the season as they
handily defeated Minnesota 164:05
to 159.55. The high bar event was

* * * Michigan's strong point as all five
0 SAPPORO, Japan - The Soviet Union continued its strong Wolverine entries Ed Howard, Jim
showing yesterday in a preview of the 1972 Winter Olympics with a Skully, Ted Marti, Rick McCurdy
victory in the women's 15-kilometer cross-country ski relay while last and Ray Gura all scored over nine

1. MICHIGAN at Purdue,
(pick score)
2. Wisconsin at Northwestern
3. Indiana at Iowa
4. Michigan State at Minnesota
5. Illinois at Ohio State
6. Notre Dame at DePaul
7. Duke at Maryland
8. Southern California at
Oregon
9. Jacksonville vs. Bradley
10. LaSalle vs. Villanova
11. Virgiina at Wake Forest
{ 12. UCLA at Oregon State

13. Detroit at Marquette
14. Miami (O) at Ohio U.
15. Western Michigan at
Northern Illinois
16. Washington at California
17. Drake at St. Louis
18. Tennessee Tech at Western
Kentucky
19. Dartmouth at Columbia
20. Alaska at Hawaii

z)
i
(a

year's world champions from West Germany captured the two-man
bobsled competition.
Having already won the four-man 40-kilometer cross-country
relay, the Russians picked up victory No. 2 when the team of Galina
Kulakova, Alevtina Olunina - both reigning world champions - anda
23-year-old Nina Fedorova breezed home more than a minute in
front in the women's 15-kilometer race.
Petitioning now open for:
Central Student Judiciary
5 SEATS
Petitions and information available at S.G.C.
offices (1st floor S.A.B.)
Petitions must be in before
MONDAY, Feb. 15, at 5:00 p.m.
Interviewing on Sunday & Monday, Feb. 14 & 15
Women and men of all schools and colleges are
urged to app ly

FOR UNIVERSITY
PEOPLE WHO CARE
WE NOW HAVE
4 SHOPS TO SERVE YOU
" ARBORLAND
* MAPLE VILLAGE
" LIBERTY OFF STATE
" EAST UNIV. OFF SO. UNIV.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS

a

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State Street at Liberty

I

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

1

MARTY
4 p.m. Rackham
TODAY

BORED?
LET LUMS ENTERTAIN
YOU THIS WEEK
TUES.+& WED.
LINDA FORD sings folk music
THURS. & SAT.
SPECIAL SURPRISE ...
(But we might talk if you give us a call)
FRIDAY
PHASE I ploys jazz
all shows are from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
after 9 p.m. all patrons must be 21
663-1740

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0

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CONCORD'S MK 8
R Tu.iicur and R l an-n ai

M
I

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All Speakers of English as a Second Language- Are
Invited to Take Part in an Experimental Test of Eng-
lish I onninnnk Pefiri nrv +o ha ;vn in RACKHAM

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