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February 04, 1971 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 4, 197 1

NASA BUDGET DROPS
?bate continues on space funds

For the student body:
SGenuine

as technological and economic
benefits, scientific knowledge,
and world prestige..
Many say the United States is
making a mistake by cutting
back its space effort at a time
when the Soviet Union is exert-
ing its greatest effort in this
area.
One is Dr. F6y D. Kohler,
former U.S. ambassador to Rus-
sia who is conducting an ex-
tensive study of the American
and Soviet space programs un-
der, a $700,000 government grant.
Kohler, 'now a professor at the

University of Miami's Center
for Advancad'International Stu-
dies, says the United States is
in danger of losing this position
if it continues drastic cuts in
space and defense research.
Kohler said Russia is spend-
ing about 2 per cent of its gross
national product on space while
the United States is spending less
than one half of 1 per cent. He
estimates the Soviets have about
600,000 persons working on space
projects, compared with 145,000
for the United States. At its peak
in 1966, the American program
had 420,000 persons.
The space agency budget has
been sliced from $5.9 billion in
1966 to $3.2 billion this year. In
the process, three of the planned
Apollo moon landings have been
dropped, and the United States
faces a four or five year period
starting in 1973 when it will not
send men into space.
Kohler expects Russia to move
ahead rapidly and says the So-'
viets have at least a two-year
lead in the development of the
next major space goal, the large
orbiting space station.
Opponents, especially those in
Congress, feel NASA can main-
tain an on-going space program
and a lead over Russia with an
annual budget of around $3 bil-
lion.
Their main target presently is
the space shuttle, a reusable
rocket ship which would be used
late in this decade to ferry men
and supplies between earth and
an orbiting space station. They
failed, however, in a December
attempt to eliminate from the
NASA budget $110 million to con-
tinue study of the shuttle in 1971.
One of the leading opponents
is Sen. William Proxmire (D-
Wis.). He cited Russia's Luna
16, an unmanned craft which
returned moon soil to earth, and
Luna 17, which discharged a
wheeled rover on the moon and
said the U.S. program should
concentrate more on such auto-
matic devices.
Space agency officials note
that. Luna 16 returned only 3.5
ounces of soil and that it was
contaiminated by the exhaust of
contaminated by the exhaust of
Arguing against the shuttle,
Sen. Walter F. Mondale (D-
Minn.) said the $110 million
voted "is only the tip of an ice-
berg" which he said might cost
$14 billion or more.
Do we need
to remind
God to help
us?
No. Because God, divine
Love, is always ready
to help. What we have
to do is pray with an
understanding of His
love and guiding care.
You will hear some
outstanding examples
of practical, effective
prayer in a talk by
John Richard C. Kenyon
of The Christian Science
Board of Lectureship.
The subject of his talk
is'"Where Do We Look
for Guidance?" It's a
refreshing and entirely
logical view of prayer.
Christian Science lecture

Feb. 6-3 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRISTIAN SCIENTIST
833 Washtenaw Ave.

"The shuttle and space sta-
tion," Mondale said, "are the
first essential steps toward a
manned Mars landing - a pro-
gram that could cost anywhere
between $50 billion and $100 bil-
lion. The President apparently
believes that $110 million for
the space shuttle is more impor-
tant than providing' increased
funds for urban renewal, for a
clean environment and for im-
proved veterans care."
"I t h i n k. that -Unmanned
spacecraft should play an in-
creasingly larger part in the
whole scheme of things while
they are cheaper and can do the
job," said Rep. Joseph E. Karth
(D-Minn.).
Space officials like rocket pio-I
neer Wernher von Braun, direc-
tor of NASA's future planning,
contend the space program has
made the United States the
world's leader in technology by
forcing developments in elec-
tronics, mechanics, computers,
metallurgy, the biosciences and
fabrication techniques.
They see the space station and
shuttle as providing great eco-
nomic return from space, noting
that the shuttle, flying back and
forth on an airline-type sched-
ule will reduce the cost of get-
ting into space considerably.
Most scientists have decried
the cuts in the space program.
But congressional opponents of
the shuttle have enlisted two
eminent scientists for their cause.
They are Dr. 'James A. Van
Allen of the University of Iowa,
whose instruments aboard Amer-
ica's first satellite discovered
the Van Allen radiation belts, and
Dr. Thomas Gold of Cornell Uni-
versity, who also heads Presi-
dent Nixon's space science panel.
"The manned space program,
it seems to me, has had its day,"
Gold said. "A manned landing
on Mars would cost perhaps $100

billion. To pretend one is not
building a space shuttle in pre-
paration- for a trip to Mars is
nonsense. Unmanned, instru-
mented flight won't be as excit-
ing, but it will be far more im-
portant."
Van Allen said: "I am totally
unpersuaded that men in a space-
craft are important or even use-
ful in any way that is commen-
surate with the effort required to
maintain them there. It increases
the cost of a given mission and
risks human life unnecessarily."
He said future space flights
"should be launched for purely
scientific reasons."
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Chicago Sun-Times, Jan. 24

If you care
enough, maybe
you can meet
the Paulist
challenge...
It isn't easy, being a Paulist.
Bridging gaps between young
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past and future. But it is a
challenge.
The Paulist mission is to
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If you are interested in
finding out more about the
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write to:
Rev. Donald C. Campbell, C.S.P.
Vocation Director
GI'aulist
,fatheta'
Room 111
415 West 59th Street
New York, N.Y. 10019

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