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February 04, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT
Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open--
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 a.m.-Fri. -Sat.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Catering
769-2330

ROLAND KIRK
SAT., FEB. 6
10 p.m.-3 a.m.
SUN., FEB. 7
Matinee 5 p.m.-$3.00
Evening 9-12 p.m.-$3.75
Ibo, 17111 Third
341-0770 no age limit

"----------

wwww"s

Does her anger at a
domineering husband
justify a wife's taking
a lover?
This
wirfe
was n .
driven
out! >
diar
ofaema
housewife
-NEXT-
''LOVE STORY"S
STARTS FEB. 12

n e wsbriefs
By The Associated Press
A BLAST AND FIRE at a Thiokol Chemical Corp. plant yester-
day leveled a munitions building, killing more than 25 persons and
injuring more than 100.
The blast at the Brunswick, Ga. plant sparked a blaze that con-
sumed the remains of the building where magnesium trip flares were
reportedly being manufactured for use in Vietnam.
The division manager for the Thiokol plant said the FBI was assist-
ing in identifying bodies. He said also that the possibility of sabotage'
was being checked into.
A WHITE HOUSE presentation on revenue sharing yesterday
apparently left a number of House Republicans unconvinced.
Chief GOP spokesman on revenues, Rep. John Byrnes (R-Wis..
said afterward he opposed the President's proposal to turn $5 billion
over to state and local governments with no strings attached.
Byrnes cited a lack of working revenue and the government's in-
ability to spare the money from its own spending pressures as practical
problems inherent in the plan.
* *
A NEW JERSEY school board yesterday resumed in the
Supreme Court the protracted battle over prayers and Bible '
readings in public schools.
Appealing to the court to modify or reverse its 1963 ban on Bible;
readings and prayer recitation, the Netcong School Board told the
justices "spiritual weapons" are the nation's most powerful resources.
Last February, a New Jersey judge ordered the board to cease
the daily reading in the school gymnasium of prayers from the_
Congressional Record. Participation by students and teachers was:
optional.
BATTLES between Britsh troops and teen-agers erupted last
night in scattered-parts of Belfast.
Rioting over the past two years has stemmed from religious and
political differences with the Catholic minority claiming the Protest-
ant majority has denied them equal opportunity in jobs, housing, and
voting.
i ithfochoo'a, a.rliev,.in the dAar, ftav Aldi,,'s c~a.ehc~r1n.

Thursday, February 4, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Nixon urges bil
tolimit strikes
WASHINGTON (A' - Citing a threatened nationwide rail-
road walkout March 1, President Nixon yesterday renewed
his urgent request to Congress for the first new law in a
quarter century to forestall major strikes.
"The urgency of this matter should require no new
emphasis by anyone," Nixon said in a reminder of December's
one-day national rail strike that Congress halted until March
1 with a special law.
Secretary of Labor J. D. Hodgson said, however, the White
House has no hope that Congress will enact the proposed
new law in time to head off -_

Zt4P

S W'i ! Wn

Da4llR

-Associated Press
Lindsay listens
New York Mayor John Lindsay listens during a press conference
yesterday after he was named co-chairman of the "Commission
on Cities in the '70's."

EGYPT PROPOSAL:
Mideast cease- fire
extended one month

Ro
tie
i
J
are
fro
re

INDIVIDUAL TICKET SALES
FISHBOWL, Feb. 8-9
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
February 10-20

gtaJ y**-U* &JLJCtl ziu u 0.d WASHINGTON (') - A Cairo
man Catholic district for arms. The troops were showered with bot- broadcast reported last night that
s of acid and other missiles. Egypt will agree provisionally to
* * .extend the current Mideast cease-
fire for one month, until March 5.
SOVIET BLOC FISHING VESSELS were sighted Tuesday fish- The Cairo radio broadcast, heard
ng in restricted international waters 60 miles off the coast of New by U.S. monitors, did not spell out
Jersey, the Coast Guard reported. just what conditions the Egyp-
Under treaties with the Soviet Union and Poland, fishing in the tian government might be attach-
ea is banned at this time of year to preserve fishing stock. ing to its agreement to a one
A Coast Guard spokesman said the cutter Vigorous was speeding Informants here said they ex-
)m Connecticut to "apprise" the commander of the flotilla of treaty pect Egyptian President Anwar
quirements. No further action is contemplated, he said. Sadat will give more details in a
GROUPS CITE PROGRESS
Black voters register in South

i

B

'V

GET YOUR MANWITH A
Want Ad

yi:

..

___ - ~-~-

"Old-Time and Bluegrass Music"
The Sloney Lonesome Boys

speech scheduled to be delivered to
the Egyptian National Assembly
today.
The broadcast said: "To show
its good intentions and in response
to international public opinion,
Egypt will not proclaim the end
of the cease fire.
"The United Arab Republic will
proclaim that it will not open fire
for one month, ending March 5,
provided the Israeli government
announces during this period that
it is prepared to implement the
Security Council resolution.
"Should the Israeli government
actually be prepared to implement
the resolution, it should also set a
timetable for withdrawals."
A cease fire has been in effect
since a U.S. peace initiative got
under way last summer. However,
Arab-Israeli talks under United
Nationsauspices have begun only
recently.
U.S. diplomats have been work-
ing behind the scenes for an ex-
tension of the cease-fire.
Israel has said it would not be
the first to resume shooting. The
Egyptians had indicated t h e y
wanted progress in the talks as a
condition for extending the truce.
The Security Council resolution
referred to in the Cairo broad-
cast presumably was the Novem-
ber 1967 peace guideline resolu-
tion passed by the U.N. body after
the six-day Arab-Israeli war.

the March 1 strike threat of
nearly 500,000 rail workers.
"We are hopeful of resolving
that one by bargaining," Hodgson
told newsmen at the White House.
But Nixon said the current wage
dispute of four AFL-CIO unions
emphasizes the need for broad new
legislation to deal with national
emergency strikes in railroad, air-
line, shipping, longshore and
trucking industries.
Spokesmen for organized labor
and the railroad industry indicated
they would mount stiff opposition in
Congress against the law.
Nixon's proposal, almost iden-
tical with one he made and Con-
gress ignored last year, would
abolish the separate Railway La-
bor Act covering rail and airline
labor disputes and bring them un-
der coverage of the Taft-Hartley
Act now covering other industries.
If enacted, Nixon's proposal
would be the first legislation limit-
ing strikes since the Taft-Hartley
Act went into effect in 1947.
Nixon's bill would give the White
House three new options to deal
with transportation strikes threat-
ening the national interest.
The first would allow the Presi-
dent to extend the present Taft-
Hartley Act 80 day cooling-off in-
junction for an additional 30 days.
Or, the President could appoint
a special board to determine whe-
ther to permit a partial strike and
partial operation in a nationwide
dispute. In railroads, that would
mean letting unions strike certain
lines but leave others operating
for as long as 180 days.
If there were no settlement in
180 days, an industry-wide strike
or lockout, or further action by
Congress in a special law could
proceed.
The third option would permit the
president to appoint a neutral panel
to impose as a final solution in a
labor dispute the last offer of either
the union or the management, on
the theory that the two sides would
move closer together to avoid los-
ing too much if each other's last
offer were accepted.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

Seniority
foes meet
opposition
WASHINGTON ( - Tradi-
tion-oriented H o u s e Demo-
crats yesterday rejected an ef-
fort to remove a 72-year-old
southerner from a committee
chairmanship after shouting
down two other moves to di-
lute the power of congression-
al seniority.
The party caucus voted 126 to
96 to retain Rep. John McMillan
of South Carolina in the District
of Columbia Committee chairman-
ship he has h e 1 d for 22 years.
Younger liberal members h a d
sought his removal, asserting he
runs the panel autocratically and
has no real concern for the needs
of the predominantly black city of
Washington.
McMillan's supporters countered
that the critics are just men em-
bittered by ideological differences
with the chairman, especially his
opposition to home rule for the
District now ruled, in effect, by
Congress.
Earlier yesterday the caucus
handily defeated attempts to lim-
it length of service by all Demo-
cratic committee chairmen to four
two-year terms and to prohibit
a ny representative 70 or older
from serving as chairman.
The McMillan vote followed a
plea by the powerful Ways and
Means Committee chairman, Wil-
bur Mills (D-Ark.), to retain the
chairman or risk losing the White
House to the Republicans in 1972.
If McMillan were defeated,
Mills told his fellow Democrats, it
would be seen as a slap in the
face to Southerners and the South
and would cost the Democratic
party Southern support in the 1972
presidential elections.
The vote quashed the attempt
by liberals on the conservatively
dominated committee to win elec-
tion to the chairmanship of Rep.
Charles C. Diggs Jr. (D-Mich.), a
black.

"Hillbilly music with counterpoint."

-Carter Katz

"I've always noticed that for every tuxedo suit that's
sold, there's a hundred pairs of overhauls, and that's why
I stick to swamp opera."

ATLANTA, Ga. -) - More
than 100 groups still quietly con-
duct voter registration drives
across the South-trying to reach
an estimated 1.6 million blacks
who remain unregistered despite
the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
"Substantial progress has been
made but there is much left to be
done," said John Lewis, director
of the nonpartisan Voter Educa-
tion Project, Inc., one of the
largest groups active in voter
registration work.
"You don't hear as much about
voter registration now that the
era of the big protest march is
gone," he said. "But the job of

registering blacks still involves
hundreds of people.
"There's still resistance to our
work," added Lewis, "but of a
more subtle shading.
The project's annual report
says more than two million
blacks have been registered in
11 Southern states since pas-
sage of the Voting Rights Act.
The report said 3.36 million
blacks are on file, out of 5 mil-
lion voting age blacks.
The white registration is about
17 million out of 20 million in
the voting age group, the report
said.

"As the report indicates,"
Lewis said in an interview, "the
pool of unregistered black voters
represents a great deal of as
yet unexercised political muscle
in the South. I would not be at
all surprised to see the first
black congressmen come from
the region during the next five
to 10 years."
The report, compiled from cen-
sus tables and tabulations of
county registration figures, said
Texas has the highest percen-
tage of registered black voters,
84.7. The lowest percentage, 55.4,
is in North Carolina.

ARK COFFEE HOUSE
TONIGHT 9 p.m.

--Clayton Mac Michen
Come hear them put
those notes in there
out of context.

........;C......... . ,v; ...... . v....."........ .. ,F ... . .''
CLAUDE CHABROL sA
FILM FESTIVAL -
CC~
8 I TONIGHT- t
LEDA (Web of Passion)
1959 Chobrol with Jean-Paul Belmondo's
gastronomic orgy. A TRUE-LIFE
SUZY PARKER DIDN'T FIT THE DECOR A
"I like the screen full of color, 20 colors on the ONE WEEK ONLY
I Ha~sc ershly emotional film of love and murder.0 THPrU
7 :5Architecture -__________
c~~w' 662-8871] 75c Auditorium adls $2 5
-4 '.
The University of Michigan Bands
* Qpresents a
hPOPS" CONCERT
f eatuing
PETER NERO
AND HIS TRIO
t The University of Michigan Symphony Band
Sundy, Feb.14 330 P.M.

STUDENTS AND YOUTH CONFERENCE
ON A PEOPLE'S PEACE
FEBRUARY 5, 6 & 7
2500 PEOPLE (with sleeping bags)
FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
NEED PLACES TO SLEEP

GOT ANY
FLOOR SPACE?

CALL
763-1107, 8, 9

Rome.
Before Christ.
After Fellini.

An ALKW RTOOMALDI Piokrtm
"FLII' AYIO N

COLOR by 0 Aebm FONAV!SION ®JCD

NOW

1 0

United Artists
S TONIGHT
at 7-9 P.M.

Order Your Daily Now-

r

I I

CINEMA II
Fri. & Sat. LIFEBOAT-:00

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