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February 03, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

It

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 3, 1971

$9 MILLION BY '73-'74

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U' asks funds for black admissions

(Continued from Page 1)
During the BAM strike the
cleans and governing faculties of
the schopls and colleges agreed
to meet the difference, which
could conceivably be as much as
$4.5 million, out of their own
operating budgets.
"We have long known that we
must continually re-examine our
total budget to find new money
for higher priority items, and
this is now simply a very high
priority," Fleming wrote soon
after.
The fact that the University
has assigned such a high prior-
ity to suporting increased black
admissions has aroused s o m e
private resentment among a few
faculty members, students and
alumni.
"The people hurt by a partic-
ular decision are not going to
like it and the place the money
goes is going to make them un-
happy," Yates explains.
Private contributions to the
University last year were down
about a third, a decrease at least
partially attributable to the
BAM strike, Vice President for
University Relations and Devel-
opment Michael Raddock re-
ported to the Regents last
month.
And in t h e business school,
someone, apparently a faculty
member, sent the Daily a confi-
dential report issued by the
school and underlined a state-
ment that blacks, although only
two per cent of t h e entering
graduate class, were receiving
20 per cent of the school's sch-
olarship funds.
Financial Aid Director Brown
points out that while funds for
financial support for blacks will
be increased, the total financial
aid budget will also rise.
"White students are not going
to be shut out," he says. "But
we are going to increase our em-
phasis on low-income' groups."
Brown denies tlat aid to
white undergraduates has been

cut because of the minority en-
rollment program.
"When there are cutbacks it
is either because there are
changes in (family) income that
they report to us or because we
usually expect students to pro-
vide more out of their own earn-
ings each year," Brown says, ex-
plaining that sophomores, for
example, would normally receive
less aid than freshmen.
Of this year's general f u n d

for working in occupations such
as teaching.
Finally, the federal work-
study program gives students
jobs with the federal govern-
ment paying 80 per cent of
their education and the em-
ployer paying the other 20 per
cent. About 33 minority under-
graduates are now in this pro-
gram.
One other issue concerning
undergraduates left over from

office to Detroit to help fill out
the form.
For black and other minority
graduate students, the Oppor-
tunity Program is allocating
$293,000 this year and addition-
al funding is provided by a
wide variety of fellowships, loans
and grants.
While the amount of aid for
black graduate students is in-
creasing, financial support for
white graduate students is drop-
ping sharply because of c u t -
backs in federal funds allocat-
ed to graduate education.
"The best estimate for the
University at this time is that
total federal funding of its ma-
jor fellowship programs will de-
crease by about $662,000 in
1971-72," the University's bud-

get request for next year states.
Although the University is
attempting to recoup some of
this money by part of the $1.3
million requested increase in
financial aid funds, the dispar-
ity between support for white
and black graduate students will
most likely continue.
"We've come nowhere close
to meeting their needs," Brown
says of graduate and especially
professional students in areas
such as medicine and dentistry.
The achievement of better dis-
tribution of aid funds to all stu-
dents when not enough money is
available might require the Uni-
versity to provide aid in the
form of long-term loans rathen
than outright grants," Brown
adds.

"We have long known that we must con-
tinually re-examine our total budget to find new
money for higher priority items, and this is now
simply a very high priority," President Robben
Fleming wrote after the Black Action Movement
strike.
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budget about $3.27 million is
included for student aid funds.
Of this amount, $802,743 or
about one-quarter is allocated to
the Opportunity Program for
minority students.
Besides the Opportunity Pro-
gram, Brown explains, under-
graduate minority student g e t
most of the rest of their aid from
three federal programs.
The first, Educational Op -
portunity Grants, is aiding 255
minority undergraduates this
year. These grants, are lim-
ited to students from families
with less than $9,000 annual in-
come.
The National Defense Student
Loan program helping to sup-
port 114 minority students, has
no set income limit but students
must show definite financial
need.
The loans are interest-free
while the student is attending
the University, with 3 per cent
annual interest thereafter. Re-
payment of the loan is reduced

the BAM dispute still has not
been settled. The black students
claimed that the Parents Con-
fidential Statement (PCS), used
to determine financial need,
should be revised.
"The Parents Confidential
Statement is complex, but there
is no better system of n e e d
analysis currently available,"
Brown.,says.
To aid minority students and
their parents with Brown plans
to send representatives of h i s

Join The Daily
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NOW is the time to buy your
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4V
4

I

READ
-JAMES WECHSLER-
.in
~jOg £iIt Da lyj

6 Hours of
i Sient FilmCassics
7:00-THE KID-Chaplin
EASY STREET-Chaplin
THE NEW YORK HAT-Mary Pickford
THE ORIGINAL DR. JEKYL AND MR. HYDE
9:00-GERTY THE DINOSAUR-the first cartoon
SHOULDER ARMS---Chaplin
TWO TARS-Laurel and Hardy
TRIP TO THE MOON-Melies
PARIS QUI DORT-Clair
1 1 :00-FATAL GLASS OF BEER-W. C. Fields
BROKEN BLOSSOMS-D. W. Griffith

4

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MODEL 20 with AM
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II

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