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February 03, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-02-03

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STUDENTS AND YOUTH CONFERENCE
ON A PEOPLE'S PEACE
FEBRUARY 5, 6 & 7
2500 PEOPLE (with sleeping bags)
FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
NEED PLACES TO SLEEP

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, February 3, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

GOT ANY
FLOOR SPACE?

CALL
763-1107, 819

news briefs
By The Associated Press

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1~
MATURING/
THE WORLD'S LARGEST BEAR
From
ALASKA
toBAJAI inCLR
AN A B D B
PRODUCTION
d
A TRUE-LIFE ADVENTURE
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
THE BEST ANIMAL-SCENIC EFFORTS
OF ANY KIND EVEN RANKING WITH
DISNEY." Lee Straight-VANCOUVER SUN
STARTS TODAY
ONE WEEK ONLY
adults-$2.50 PIPTH POrUM SHOWS
01FTH AVENUE AT LBIBWATV 0 :0
under 12-75c DOWNONANN A4:3 7:00
O 9
GINIMA BULD1
CLAUDE CHABROL FILM FESTIVAL
FEBRUARY 1-7
4 films from the man who learned suspense from Hitchcock.
Creator with Godard and Truffaut of the NEW WAVE Chabrol
exposes the swell of passion with sudden violence
Heroic gastronomy and the subtle grace of the 7 Capital
Sins.
"Chilling and beautiful"
". the Cinema of Cruely and Compassion"
) x
Jacqueline Sassard and Stephane Audron in LES BICHES
A MURDER IN EVERY MOVIE:
Thu., Feb. 4-LEDA (WEB OF PASSION) 1959. Jean-Paul Bel-
mondo's gastronomic orgy. An emotional film of love and murder.
Fri., Feb. 5-LES COUSINS 1958. Country cousin come to live
with decadent Parisian Jean-Claude Brialy.
" Sat., Feb. 6-LES BICHES 1968. Another triangle of lesbianism
and irony. Chabrol "back in business again"
Sun.. Feb. 7-LE SCANDALE-THE CHAMPAGNE MURDERS.
Chabrol in Hollywood. A wine-making empire, and Tony Perkins
not playing a psychotic for once.
7 & 6 PM 75c ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM
NOTICE:
Cinema Guild announces petitiong for membership on its board.
All interested and qualified persons are welcomed. Underclassmen
especially encouraged.I

Sign-up for interview appointments in Architecture Auditorium
lobby. A sign-up sheet will be posted on the central column there.

CHRYSLER CORPORATION white collar workers went on
strike yesterday, but United Auto Worker negotiators and the auto
company reached a contract agreement when the walkout was only
three hours old.
Details of the agreement were not disclosed, but the settlemen
was believed to match the 13 per cent salary increase given to nonuniol
personnel at Ford and General Motors.,
THE SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE yesterday gave 13-0
approval to the nomination of John B. Connally as secretary of the
treasury.
The action apparently assured easy Senate confirmation for the
Texas Democrat, former governor of Texas and secretary of the nav3
under President John F. Kennedy.
* * *
. MICHIGANREPUBLICANS took control of the State Senate
without one word of debate yesterday.
Though the Senate is divided evenly between Democrats and Re
publicans, the GOP can effectively break ties by using the vote of
Lieutenant Governor James Brickley.
On a voice vote, with two democrats absent, the Senate named Sen,
Milton Zaagman of Grand Rapids as president pro tem and Sen. An-
thony Stamm of Kalamazoo as assistant president pro tem.
PRESIDENT NIXON asked Congress yesterday to move
ahead full speed with welfare reform, combined with a 6 per
cent, rather than 10 per cent, increase in Social Security benefits.
Presenting its case to the House Ways and Means Committee,
the administration asked for basically the same bill passed only by the
House last year, based on a federally assured income of $1600 per
year for a family of four.
* * *
NEGOTIATIONS between Western oil companies and Persian
Gulf producing countries, concerning petroleum prices, collapsed
last night.
The breakdown in the talks raised the threat of an oil cut-off
to Western Europe and Japan.
I The Persian Gulf countries supply 85 per cent of the world's
oil exports.
UGANDA'S rebel army leader named a new cabinet yesterday,
made up almost entirely of civilians.
Maj. Gen. Idi Amin, who toppled President Milton Obote's civilian
regime last week, appointed 16 civilians to fill 18 cabinet seats.
Amin kept the titles of head of state, minister of defense and com-
mander of the armed forces for himself.
THREE EXPLOSIONS destroyed a hijacked Indian airliner at
Pakistan's Lahore airport yesterday, bringing relations between
India and Pakistan to a new low.
The hijackers claimed to be "freedom fighters" for Kashmir State,
which is claimed by both India and Pakistan.

-Associated Press
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin Laird testifies on President
Nixon's plan for an all-volunteer Army, before the Senate
Armed Servic: Committee yesterday.
TOUCHDOWN FRIDAY:
Apollo 14 set for
moon orbit, landing
SPACE CENTER, Houston (A- sharply toward a valley in an an-
The Apollo 14 astronauts s p e d cient moon mountain range called
through space yesterday right on Fra Mauro.
time for arrival tomorrow in lunar Roosa remains on board Kitty
orbit and an exploration the next Hawk, keeping the mother ship
day on the surface of the moon. ready for the return of the moon
Mission Control said spacemen explorers.
A 1 a n B. Shepard Jr., Stuart A. Mission Control said yesterday
Roosa and Edgar D. Mitchell doz- that the planned crash on t h e
ed off and on yesterday but they moon of the spent Saturn third-
awoke occasionally to look back at stage rocket hull will be slightly
their mother planet. off target. The racket, which

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Laird defends
volunteer army
before committeel
WASHINGTON F -- Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
rejected yesterday the idea that frontline soldiers in an all
volunteer Army would consist primarily of blacks and other
disadvantaged minority citizens.
"This will not be the major problem," he said. "We will
have a well rounded, well-trained military service" if Con-
gress provides sufficient pay and education incentives.
He estimated it would cost an additional $5 billion a year
for servicemen's salaries if the nation is to attract and keep
sufficient volunteers so the draft can be ended safely.
Laird gave his views before a skeptical Senate Armed
Services Committee as he presented the administration's plea
for a two-year extension of the draft and 5 per cent pay hike
for lower-grade enlisted menl +-
as part of the plan to elimi-
nate the draft by mid 1973. s1
Committee Chairman John C.Jd a
Stennis (D-Miss.) said going into
the marketplace to compete on a
salary basis for men would attract
a great number of "dropouts, mis-
fits, ne'er-do-wells, whatever you
want to call them."t l f
Stennis also asserted that com- LO ii11itar
peting for men on a salary basis
instead of drafting men from all
walks of life would destroy the WASHINGTON 0P) - The State
spirit of t h e modern American Department told Congress yester-
Army. day that $693.1 million in Food
Laird insisted it is difficult to For Peace .funds have been con-
attract men into. the services be- verted into military assistance for
cause of the low pay scales, not- Korea and South Vietnam, a n d
ing that a New York City police- other countries since 1965.
man receives $9,500 a y e a r to Undersecretary of State J o hn
start. N. Irwin, testifying before the
By comparison, he said, a re- Senate-House Economic Com-
cruit who has just completed bas- mittee, said the conversions were
ic training receives only $2,700 a made with U.S. permission over
year - $600 less than the feder- the past six years from local cur-
ally established minimum w a g e rencies generated by the program.
which amounts to $3,300 a year. Irwin released statistics showing
Laird said all military payrolls that in the period 1965-70, South
and allowances in 1964 totaled $14 Vietnam converted $446 million in
billion, but will hit $29.4 billion Food for Peace funds to mil-
this year for an Army of roughly tary purposes and Korea $221.3
the same size, million.
Stennis declared he supports The money derives from the sale
the idea of volunteer military ser- of American foodstuffs for local
vice but added, "the volunteer ob- currencies. Irwin said the money
jective to me is a flight f r o m can be used for any purpose that
reality unless the size of the arm- the receiving country sees f i t,
ed forces is to be reduced . . . far consistent with its wellbeing and
below any figures I consider our security.
ninimum requirements." Senuril
______Sen. William Proxmire (D-
Wis.), chairman of the commit-
-ice r vealstee, said, "If a country needs these
icefunds for security reasons, it
should make its case on that basis,
rather than to pervert Food For
Peace to food for war."
Sen. George McGovern (D-S.D.)
the first director of the Food For
Since the proposal went to the Peace program, testified Congress
ate commission Monday, the ear- must move quickly to consolidate
iest date for the increase is May all provisions of existing law which
1-100 days. However, postal of- affect U.S. military assistance
icials said the temporary increases to other nations to improve Its
are likely to go into effect "on or ability to supervise the programs
bout May 15." properly. -
Asst. Postmaster Gen. James W. "If that is the inevitable result
Hargrove, who outlined the rate of the law as it now stands, t h e
>ackage at a news conference, said law ought to be changed and we
he proposals will allow the postal ought to limit all funds connected
service to "operate on a sound fi- with this program to nonmilitary
ancial basis for the first time inI purposes."

ann arbor film co-op
General
Membership Meeting
Wednesday

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The astronauts started a sleep
period shortly after 10 a.m. EST
yesterday and were awakened at
about 7 p.m.
A 10 second rocket burn Mon-
day night changed the Apollo 141
flight plan slightly and assured it
of an on-time rocket into lunar
orbit at 2:01 a.m. tomorrow. TheI
lunar landing is scheduled forI
4:16 a.m. Friday.

Doosit Apollo 14 toward he
moon was fired Sunday toward a
lunar collision tomorrow about 186
miles west of the Apollo 12 land-
ing site in the moon's S e a of
Rains.

~1

Postal Serv

8:00 p.m.

3529 SAB

Board Vacancies Must Be Filled

Mission Control said the burn,
Monday was not as precise as had WOT
been planned and Apollo 14 will be ;WASHINGTON () - The U.S.
slightly outside the predicted point Postal Service unveiled yesterday
of arrival in moon orbit. This is a rate increase package headed
not considered a problem, how- by an eight cent letter stamp that
ever, because later rocket firings officials said would put the mails
will refine the flight path. on a sound financial basis for the
first time in decades.
After the initial rocket firing In addition to a two cent increase
to place Apollo 14 into a moon or- in regular first class postage there
bit of 69 by 195 miles, the astro- would be a one cent hike in the cost
nauts -will fire another rocket of airmail stamps, an eventual
;burst four ho~urs later to drop toduln fnwsae n aa
an orbital low point of 11.5 miles, zine rates, and a one-third increase
the lowest command ship orbit ev- inratesoadvetir ne.
er attempted. in rates for advertising.
The proposed new rates must be
This 'ow orbit sets the stage for cleared by the independent postal
Shepard and Mitchell to board rate commission established by the
the lunar lander they call Antares postal reorganization legislation
and to cast off from command of last year. If the commission does
not act within 90 days, temporary
ship Kitty Hawk. Then they drop increases may be put into effect
- after 10 more days.

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1_ ° '

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

many years."
He conceded that the price of
stamps and other postage may
have to be increased even more
as postal costs rise, particularly
wages of postal unions and man-
agement for a contract expected
to take effect July 1.

.:

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
Does her anger at a
domineering husband
justify a wife's taking
a lover? 9

r

ANNIVERSARY SPE(IAL

ALL SHOWS
ALL TIMES
admission only

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615 6..MwrLA0
6623903

'-mmlikk

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