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January 30, 1971 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page

Iers

lose one

more

tough

one

The

By RICK CORNFELD puck trickle through Maertz's legs,
Michigan's i c e r s, who have and skated around the bewildered
broken more hearts in the last Bulldog.
month than Casanova, lost another Seven feet in front of the goal,
heartbreaker last night to Minne- Slack lofted a shot that went over
sota-Duluth, 8-5. the goalie into the top corner of

Court

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RANDY PHILLIPS

JeoteI'

11

A. LIEE KIRK.

The Wolverines were tied witht
the Bulldogs as late as three
quarters of theswayathrough the:
final period, but, as coach Al{
Renfrew said after the game,°
"everything they touched in the
last five minutes went in." Min-
nesota-Duluth was skating with-
out five regulars.#

the net.

That tied the score again and
sent 2400 people shrieking with
delight, but the shrieks soon turn-
ed to groans. "It was a good game
for 55 minutes," Renfrew said af-
ter 55 minutes plus five.
Slack's goal marked the end of
the first 55 minutes, and a score
frme D hIiolh nL rac3-wrnanri # u-

Tiger Stadium dilemma
.*..look west, old men
W ITH SNOWFLAKES falling on moor and meadow, it is a
little painful to think about baseball, but in the- Motor City,
the national pastime is always in season.
The various groups pushing for a new stadium to house the
Tigers and the Lions have started spring training a little early
this year. Current proposals would have the new stadium built
outside Pontiac, in Southfield, or on the Detroit River near
Cobo Hall.
There is, however, strong opposition to all three plans.
Southfield and Pontiac are not Detroit, and there is strong
feeling that the Tigers and Lions should remain in Detroit.
If a new stadium is built in Detroit, city residents' taxes
would payfor it. With the city's jails, its schools and em-
ployes all crying for money, any normal sense of priorities
demands that stadium building be postponed.
That the Tigers should be looking for a new stadium is
rather surprising. Their home, venerable old Tiger Stadium, is
becoming a vintage edifice in this era of symmetric structures
and synthetic turf. A fan at a Tiger game feels like he is part
of the action instead of a mere spectator.
Tiger Stadium, however, was built for baseball,. not foot-t
ball. Most seats for football are, as it were, way out in left field.
Of course, the Lions usually fill every seat in the house, but it
is their owners who are doing most of the pushing for a new,
stadium, not the Tigers'.
The push for one stadium that would house both teams
is in itself surprising. There' have been about a dozen sta-
diums built in the past decade for both baseball and foot-
ball, and they have proved less than ideal for either sport.
Ideally, if a new stadium were built, it would be the Lions
who would use it and not the Tigers. Besides the practical con-
sideration of keeping one team in the city, there is also the sen-
i timental concern of keeping Tiger Stadium intact.
Instead of building a new stadium for football, the Lions
might look into the possibility of using Michigan Stadium. Cur-
rent Big Ten regulations prohibit the use of conference school
facilities for regular season games, but the winds of change are
blowing.
Until this year, exhibition games were prohibited. But fac-
ed with rising costs, the Big Ten relented and exhibition games
will be played at some stadiums, /including Michigan Stadium,
this fall.
The Lions are not the only NFL team interested in Big
Ten stadiums. The Chicago Bears would dearly love to get
away from cramped Wrigley Field into Northwestern's
Dyche Stadium, and the Minnesota Vikings also are inter-
ested in using the facilities at Minnesota. The Cincinnati
Bengals do have a new stadium, but it is far smaller than
the horseshoe up the road in Columbus.
It is doubtful that any rapid decision is forthcoming in the
dispute over where and if a new stadium should be built in De-
troit. By that time, soaring athletic costs may well have forced
the Big Ten to reconsider its archaic policy regarding pro games.
A profit sharing plan could allow all conference schools to share
in the benefits, and everyone would come out ahead.'
IOWA, INDIANA STATE:

i
.

by hot shot freshman Pat B011-
Trailing 4-3 in the third frame, tette marked the start of the final
Bernie Gagnon brought the crowd fatal five.
of 2400 to life with about seven Boutette took a pass from Walt
minutes remaining. He took the Ledingham from the corner, and
puck all alone down the right side justin front of the net, tipped the,
of the ice, ignored Mike Jarry on puck in.
his left and sent the puck flying Two quick goals by Phil Hoene
past Duluth goalie Glenn Resch. made the result official. The first
Seconds later, freshman Julian was a shorthanded tally, Duluth's
Nixon lost a chance to put Mich- second of the game, as the Wol-
igan ahead when he missed a verines, for the most part, showed
breakaway, his shot bouncing off a lack of ability to mount a threat
Resch's right leg. with a man advantage.
Instead, Merv Kiryliuk put Du- The loss was the fourth straight
luth into the lead again when he for the Western Collegiate Hockey
took a pass from Lyman Haakstad Association cellar dwellers. After
on the left side of the ice. Kiry- the game, Renfrew, whose team
liuk, 15 feet in front of and to the might well have won three of those
left of the net, whacked a shot games, smiled with embarrass-
that bounced over the stick of ment and said, "What are you go-'
Wolverine goalie Karl Bagnell. ing to do?"
B We rActually the game had started
But the Wolverines still refused out in as promising a way as it
to quit. Two minutes later Brian
Slack took the puck at center iceN
with just Jim Maertz betweenhim KNI
and the goalie.
Slack slowed to meet Maertz just
inside the blue line, then let the
Fifty-five plus five 1Ist n

ended, with Duluth scoring just
after the opening face-off. A slap-
shot by Gregg Hubick was deflect-
ed by Haakstad past goalie Bag-
nell. i
Thirteen minutes later, Brian
Skinner let loose a slap shot from
the blue line as powerful as a
Hoyt Wilhelm knuckleball, but
Slack was just outside the crease
and deflected the puck into the
net, tying the score.
Walt Ledingham, the league's
leading scorer, scored on a re-
bound, and Buck Straub then did
the same, keeping the score tied
at the end of the first period.
A minute into the next frame,
Gagnon put Michigan in front on
a shot eight feet out, but a short
handed goal by Kiryliuk on a
break knotted the game.
Just before the end of the
period, with each team two men
'shot. Young scored, from 15
feet out, putting the Bulldogs
ahead, 4-3.

-Daily-Denny Gainer
MICHIGAN'S 'Punch Cartier' (3) places his stick down in front of the Minnesota-Duluth goalie
in hopes of tipping in a shot from the point. The Wolverines' tough defensive player turned in an-
other fine performance last night against the Bulldogs.

CKS KNOCK CELTICS

This Weekend in Sports

I

wallop Rockets

I

SCORE BY PERIODS
Duluth 2 - 2 - 4 - 8
MICHIGAN 2 - 1 - 2 - 5
First Period: SCORING: 1. (M-D)-
Haakstad (Hubick, Kirylick) 0:16; 2.
(M)-Slack (Skinner, Marra) 13:32;.
(M-D)-Ledingham (Boutette, P. Trach-
sel) 14:21; 4. (M)-Straub (Cartier, Nix-
on) 19:56. PENALTIES: 1. (M-D) Stev-
ens (kneeing) 7:04; 2. M-D)-Stevens
(misconduct) 7:04; 3. (M-D)-Heaslip
(holding) 10:39; 4. (M-D) - Trachsel
(tripping) 19.32.
Second Period: SCORING: 5. (M)-
Gagnon (Jarry) 1:08; 6. (M-D)-Kiry-
linuk (Haakstad(-Maertz) 5:04; 7. (M-D)
--Young (Hoene) 19:35. PENALTIlES : 5.
(M-D)-Stevens (trlliping) 4:47; 6. (M)
--Marra (interference) 10:01; 7. (M)--
Straub (interference) 13:19; 8. (M-D)--
Boutette (high sticking) 16:09; 9. (M)-
Lefebvre (high sticking) 16:09; 10, (-D)
--Haakstad (interference) 18:27; 11. (M)
-Cartier (interference) 18:37; 12. (M)
-Marra (high sticking) 19:08; 13. (M)-
Marra (roughing) 19:08; 14. (M-D)-
Hubick (high sticking( 19:08.
Third Period: SCORING: 8. (M)--Gag-
non (Malette) 12:44; 9. (M-D)--Kiry-
liuk (Stevens, Haakstad) 12:23; 10. (M)
--Slack (Gamsby) 14:23; 11. (M-D)-
Boutette (Ledingham, Fryer) 15:06; 12.
(M-D)--Hoene (Young) 17:01; 13. (M-D)
--Hoene (Young) 17:42. PENALTIES:
15. (M-D)-Kiryliuk (interference) 15:30;
16. (M)-Galconer (slashing) 18:28.
COALIE SAVES:
MICHIGAN (Bagnell) 11-11-13-35
M-Duluth (Resch) 10-14- 7-31

By The Associated Press
DETROIT -- The Detroit Pis-
tons scored their second biggest
victory of the season last night,
swamping the San Diego Rockets
131-104 to snap their three-game
National Basketball Association
losing streak.
The defeat was the 12th in the
last 13 games for the Rockets.
The Pistons stormed into an early
lead and, after the Rockets pulled
within four points in the third

period, broke loose on the scoring
of Bill Hewitt, Dave Bing and Bob
Lanier to take a 94-82 advantage
into the final ptriod.
Bing led the Pistons with 34
points.
* * *
Celtics seared
BOSTON - Walt Frazier and
Dave Stallworth scored 12 points
apiece in a fourth-period rally last
night as the New York Knicks

TANKERS TOUGH:
Subs dunk Toronto

NationalBasketball Association
stormed from behind for a 118-111
victory over the Boston Celtics.
Trailing 83-79 entering the fi-
nale, the Knicks caught up with
about eight minutes remaining.
Baskets by Willis Reed, Walt Fra-
zier, and Mike Riordan put them
in front 95-93.
Boston got to within a basket at
103-101, but Stallworth hit a field
goal and two free throws and Reed
added two more from the line to
pull the Knicks out of danger at
109-101 with 2 minutes left.
* * *
Bucks breeze
PHILADELPHIA - Hal Greer
joined the National Basketball As-
sociation's exclusive 20,000-point
career club last night, but his
Philadelphia 76ers lost to the Mil-
waukee Bucks 142-118.
The 34-year-old Greer needed
20 points to reach 20,000 and col'-
lected 10 field goals and a free
throw for 21. Most of his points
came on typical 15-20-foot jump
shots.
While Greer carved out a piece
of NBA history for himself, his
76ers went into a coma midway
through the third period and were
snuffed by the Bucks.

BASKETBALL-at Minnesota, 9:00
HOCKEY-Duluth at Colesium, 8:00
WRESTLING-at Ohio State
GYMNASTICS-IOWA and INDIANA STATE, Crisler Arena, 3:00
SWIMMING-at Princeton
TRACK-Michigan Relays, Yost, Field House, 10:00 a.m. to
10:00 p.m.
EUROPE $159
SUMMER:
3 5/4-6/6 4 Det-Ams-Det $159
4. 5/5-6/26 7 Det-Ams-Det $169
5. 5/15-8/15 12 Det-Ams-Det $189
6. 6/26-8/26 8 Det-Ams-Det $209
7. 7/1-8/15 6 Det-Ams-Det $209
8. 8/1-9/1 4 Det-Ams-Det $219
N.Y. departures will be added, inquire at office
Also, a Complete Range of Travel Services: Rail
Passes; Car Leases & Purchases; Motorcycles; Intra-
European Charters & Many More.
Also available, summer job opportunities and num-
erous mini-trek tours.
Travel and administrative services by
WORLD WIDE CHARTER
211 SOUTH STATE STREET

Gymnasts tackle toughest foes

By BOB ANDREWS
There very well could be a di-
mension of excitement for t h e
Wolverine gymnastic team this
weekend as they will host a tri-
ngular meet at Crisler Arena. The
wo opponents are Iowa, the 1969
NCAA Team Champions, and In-
diana State, which ranks as one
of the finest gymnastic squads in
the nation.
The Wolverines are coming off
a very convincing 163.7 to 150.4
Ahellacking of Eastern ,Michigan
and Coach Newt Loken was quite
pleased with his squad's perform-
ance. But he added, "There are
certain areas we will have to work
on, namely the parallel bars, but:
we should be ready when the meet
comes."
*The reason Loken emphasized
the need for work on the parallel
bars is that in the meet against
Eastern Michigan, the Huron's
captain, Lanny Mills, managed to
place second in the event. If it
weren't for Mills' efforts, the Wol-
verines would have swept the first
#ree places in every event.
Even if they sweep the parallel

bar event, it is highly unlikely that
the Wolverines will be able to do
so in all the other events.
Indiana State is led by Dave
Seal, last year's NCAA r i n g
champion, along with Fred Hen-
derson and Ray Jauch in the floor
exercises, all-arounder, John Pel-
likan; and Kevin Murphy and Ed
Slezak, 9.4 workers on the side
horse.
If that is not enough for the
Wolverines to worry about, t h e
Hawkeye team will bring with
them, Barry Slotten, the Big Ten
floor exercise champion, k e n
Liehr, the Big Ten side h o r s e
champion, and Dan Rapp, the Big
Ten rings champion.
In last week's meet, all-around-
er Rick McCurdy perfectly exe-
cuted a twisting vault which he
! had been working on for a long
time, to earn hi ma 9.35 score.
Against the likes of S e a 1 and
Rapp, McCurdy will have to do
as well, if not better, to capture
that event.
Overall, McCurdy, finished with
a 53.90 total, placing in the top
three in all the events. The other
two Wolverine versatility special-

ists, Ted Marti and Ray Gura fin-
ished w i t h 52.70 and 52.75 re-
spectively.
It will be the performance of
these three that will be instru-
mental in how well the Wolverines
will fare admist this field of many
talented gymnasts.
Murray Plotkin, on the parallelj
bars; Ed Howard and Jim Scully,
on the high bars; Ward Black, on
the floor exercises and Dick Kaz-
iny on the side horse, all of whom
finished with 9.00-plus scores in;
their respective events, will round
out Loken's squad of starters who
will be out to defend the team's
winning streak and its status as
National Champions against what
is easily the toughest competition
of the year.
'.":tt.X . Y"hm "..1} { L ". m .""

By JOHN SOMMERS
Those Michigan swimmers n o t
competing at Princeton today eas-
ily drowned the University of
Toronto Maple Leafs last night by
an 89 to 24 margin. The team was
split by two back-to-back meets
scheduled here last night and at
Princeton today.
The meet started slowly due to
repeated power failures during the
one meter event, but Michigan's
divers handled the additional pres-
sure well finishing one-two in
both the one and three meter
events; Jim Creede topped all div-
ers with 291 poists in the 3 meter
competition.
Michigan did almost as well in
the swimming contests losing but
two of the eleven events. Erke-
hard Schoettle and Joe Bryk, two
of the promising freshmen on the
squad left in Ann Arbor, won three
events; Schoettle touched o u t
Mike Holloway in the 220 yard
freestyle and Bryk outdistanced
Fo he student body:
FotFLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
'lTads
SSebring
CHECKMATE

Mike Dwyer in both the 500 and
1000 yard freestyle.
Upperclassment captured the
other six events. Bill Mahony cop-
ped the 200 yard breaststroke, Jeff
Watts won the 100 yard freestyle,
Tim Norlen took the 200 yard but-
terfly, Greg Goshorn swept the
200 yard backstroke. The Michi-
gan swimmers won both relays.
Michigan's top swimmers took
leave for Princeton yesterday af-
ternoon, before the blizzard began
and will take on the Tigers today
in a dual meet.

or
611 CHURCH STREET
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Dial: "ON-A-TRIP" 66-2-8747
U of M students, faculty, staff and their immediate

Open only to
families.

I

WORSHIP

Sothrn Scores
Southern California 81, Illinois 69
Marquette 87, Chicago Loyola 52
Washington and Jefferson 72,
Carnegie-Mellon 71:
Worcester Tech 84, Bates 82
Wyoming 74, New Mexico 59
Colby 62, Coast Guard 49
Texas El Paso 69, Colorado State 68
Coe 64, Cornelk 57
Michigan Tech 73, Winona 67
Quincy 105, Lewis 79
Beloit 66, Grinnell 44
Curry 89, Hawthorne 64
West Liberty 111, Davis and Elkins 98
COLLEGE HOCKEY
Minnesota-Duluth 8, MICHIGAN 5
North Dakota 4, Minnesota 1
Boston College 7, St. Lawrence 4
St. Louis 3, Ohio U. 2
Middlebury 10, Colgate 4

Professional League Standingsy

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "Mind Your Own Business!"
Broadcast WNRS 1290 AM, WNRZ 103 FM,
1 1:00 a.m.-12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Jan. 31:
5:30 p.m.-Worship, Wesley Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program: "Alternative Hetero-
sexual Models," Wesley Lounge.
Thursday, Feb. 4:
Luncheon Discussion led by Edward McCracken
12:00 noon - "Different S t r o k e s for
Churchy Folks" (Mission Work). Lunch
25c.
Friday, Feb. 5:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion led by Bart-
lett Beavin: "The Historic Church." Lunch
25c.
5:00 p.m. through Sunday noon-Wesley
Winter Retreat, Tecumseh Woods. Meet
at church for dinner in Pine Room.
6:15 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Youth Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program: "Transcendental Med-
itation," Wesley Lounge.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-"All Shook Up."
t-n "-rk rN,_

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C, Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.---
Sermon Title: "The Spirit of Unity," Rev.
Terry N. Smith (preaching).
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Sermon by
Mr. Sanders.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.--Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. --
Mon., 10-9: Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
davs and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St.
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11:00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held
at YM-YWCA, 350 South Fifth Ave.-Ron
Johnson.
7:30 p.m. Tuesdqv--Study and Prover Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prayer
and Counseling, also, 12 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
Daily Word, published at Unity Village, is
available.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion-Winter soldier
investigation.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. - Contemporary Worship (Holy
Communion).
11:00 a.m.-Matins.
1:00 p.m.-Folk Mass.
6:00 p.m.-Supper and Fellowship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheios, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Sermon by pastor, "The Strength That God
Gives." (Communion at 9:30).
Sunday at 11:00 o.m.-Bible Study: Epistle
to the Romans.
Sunday at 5:30 p.m.-Meet at chapel to go
to 2870 Aurora for supper at the home of

II

I'

a

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pet. GB
New York 38 17 .690 -
Philadelphia 33 23 .594 51>
Boston 29 26 .530 9
Buffalo 16 42 .276 23
Central Division
Baltimore 32" 21 ,596 -
Cincinnati 22 30 .420 8
Wleveland 9 48 .158 24
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 43 9 8-
Detroit 35 19 .643 9
Chicago 31 22 .585 12
Phoenix 32 23 .52 12
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 29 21 .580 -
'an Francisco ?8 26 .519 3
.eattle 25 28 .472 5"-
San Diego 24 32 .430 8
Portland 17 37 .315 14

Phoenix at Portland, inc.
Today's Games
San Diego at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at New York
Seattle at Phoenix
Los Angeles vs. San Francisco at
Oakland

State Street at Liberty

Boston
New York
Montreal
Toronto
Vancouver
D)et roit
Buffalo
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphi
Minnesota
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
California
Ye

NHL
East Division
W L T Pts.GF4
34 8 6 74 233:1
9 9 9 69 162:
22 14 11 53 1671
22 24 3 47 164:
15 28 5 35 1301
14 27 6 341291
11' 26 10 32 112:V
West Division
32 10 6 70 181:
21 13 14 56 131l
a 17 22 9 43 1231
16 22 10 42 1071
15 22 12 42 1361
s 14 23 9 37 1371
15 30 3 33 120V
sterday's Results

GA
126
107
132
143
176
184
182
111
117
142
137
140
171
172

ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
Sundav, Jin. 1 a 10.30 nm.-Warren Mil-

Yesterday's Results

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-% w w -S M Wr -

EII

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