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January 29, 1971 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-29

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 29, 1

Pae enTH MCHGA DiL

LSA govt. hits section deletions

(Continued from Page 1)
of students affected by the delet-
ed sections at between 70 and 80
of the approximately 175 in the
course.
Hefner said last night he had
not received any official n o t i c e
from the curriculum committee
that the sections had been delet-
ed.
"My position at this time is
that they don't havesany legal
grounds upon which to take my
sections away," he said. "My in-
terpretation of their delay in no-
tifying me is that they are pos-
sibly having second thoughts
about their action, in view of the
motions passed by the LSA gov-
ernment and the general interest
which the issue has aroused."
Fleming said that through ad-
ministrative errors in the course's
organization, a number of pro-
posed teachers were not associat-
ed with the LSA faculty in any
respect, and failed to obtain the
approval of the dean and the
executive committee.
Since the term is too far ad-
vanced to practically permit ap-
proval to be granted now, accord-
ing to committee members, the
decision to delete the six sections
is completely unnegotiable.
Bass emphasized that at no
point was approval for the sec-
tions ever rescinded. He said the
curriculum committee never ap-
proved the sections in the first
place, but rather approved of the
course as a whole at a meeting on
Jan. 19, while at the same time
stipulating thatathe course mart
committee would subsequently re-
view the sections separately,
making them subject to deletion
at the committee's discretion.
The reason the course was ap-
proved at that time but not the
individual sections, Bass said, was
to guarantee the 175 students en-
rolled in the course that they
would be receiving three college
U S -

credits for the course, even
though they might be forced to
move to another section if theirs
was scrapped.
The committee members ve-
hemently denied that the dele-
tions were made for political rea-
sons, citing several other courses
among the current course mart of-
ferings which are "of as much or,
more of a radical nature" than
College Course 327.
Tikofsky said the list of Winter
term courses included "Problemsj
in Counter Culture" taught by a
psychology undergraduate, "Marx-
ism and Methodology", taught by
a confirmed Marxist and "Viet-
nam: "Cultural Perspective",
taught by a -Vietnamese woman.
"Statements to the effect that
we are being politically repressive
are simply not true," Tikofsky
said. "Our actions came about
not because of the political nature
of the course but because of sev-
eral administrative errors by the
sponsor."
"If it was political repression,
it would have been total," said
Bass. "We wouldn't have approved
any of the sections. Intellectual
repression goes against the very
reason the course mart was
f ormed."
At the start of the afternoon's
meeting, Steve Nissen, '71, and
Fred Rosen. Research assistant at
the Conflict Resolution Center en-
tered and asked for reasons why
the sections had been deleted.
Nissen was to teach one of the
deleted sections, while Rosen is
presently teaching a section on
ideology, which was not deleted.
Last night, Nissen told LSA
government members that the cur-
riculum committee had been pres-
sured from "somewhere above" to
delete the six sections. He said the
committee applied criteria to the
course which they had never ap-
" :? '

plied to any other course mart
courses.
"The entire issue of the techm-
cal reasons for denial of credit,
to the six sections is a red her-
ring," Nissen said. "No questions
were raised about this course until
it got all the publicity that it did,
from ads that appeared in the
Daily and leaflets passed around
campus."
"The most important issue in
this whole affair is the right of
those 80 students to elect thet
courses they desire to meet their
educational needs, and not cater
to the whims of people like Locke
Anderson," he continued.
Nissen claimed the rule con-'
cerning the approval of teachers

Jury fails to reach
verdict in RAM case
By ALAN LENHOFF
A Washtenaw County Circuit Court jury adjourned last night
without reaching a verdict in the case of a University student charged
with assaulting an Ann Arbor policeman during last spring's Black
Action Movement (BAM) strike.
County Judge William F. Ager asked the jury to resume delibera-
tions this morning in the case of Thaddeus (T.R.) Harrison.
Harrison is charged with "assault with intent to commit great
bodily harm less than murder," stemming from an incident occurring
during the strike.
Harrison allegedly threw a brick at an Ann Arbor policeman
during a scuffle in front of the Administration Bldg. last March 19.
Ager said that generally in cases "of this sort", the jury is sent
to a hotel where they are locked up to insure that they will not

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for the course has not
lowed in any course ma:
he is aware of.
"I have been teachin
course 309 (Planned Chf
two semesters, and as
know I was never approv
dean or executive comm
said, "but now they won
teach in College Course
which I am probably m
fied."
Tikofsky said the c
would not permit Nissen
a section of 327 becaus
agreed that an unde
would not be able to t
courses in the same term
tion to his class load.
Speaking of the motio
by the LSA government,
said "considering all t
about the issue that I kn
ISA student governmen
know, I think they've g
torted. Their action sad
angers me, and frustrate
At a policy board m
the course Wednesday
motion was approved toe
a mass delegation of stu
a small group of the te.
the deleted sections to ne:
day's curriculum commit
ing to demand reasons fo
letion of the sections.
Anderson s a i d yester
riculum committee mee
open and there would n
attempt to prevent the c
from attending. He add
ever, that the issue wo
nitely not be on the agen
"The whole matter
closed," Anderson said.

been fol- discuss the case with other people.
rt courses *He said, however, he was making
courses radicals an exception in this trial.
g college The jury has four alternatives.
ange) for soIt can convict Harrison of the
fas as I f ar'' ll"' charge of "assault with intent to
ed by the (Continued from do great bodily harm less t h a n
ittee," he ( Page 1) murder," which carries a maxi-
't let me Recent troop reductions in mum penalty of ten years in pri-
327, for (Continued from Page 1) soni;
re quali- South Vietnam actually increas-
ed "the murder factory of Viet- It can lower the charge to felon-
ommittee nam," Lane charged. "With the ious assault if it is determined
to teach bombing seven times greater now that there was no intent to do
se it was than when Nixon was elected - great bodily harm. This charge
rgraduate the equivalent of 2%/2 Hiroshimas has a maximum penalty of four
each two every single week - American years;
in addi- soldiers are only in the way." It can lower the charge to as-
The program started with many sault and battery if it judges that
ns passed in the audience taking part in the assault was the result of a
Fleming singing and dancing on the audi- moment of anger. This charge is a
the facts torium's stage. Calling the stage misdemeanor;
ow which "liberated", the group was led ,in
t doesn't the signing by several young musi- It can reach a verdict of not
ot it dis- cians. After the speeches, Rubin guilty.
dens me, suggested that discussions con- Fourteen jurors listened to the
es me." tinue at the Umon because the three days of evidence in the trial.
eeting of auditorium was being rented by Two were eliminated from the
night, a the hour. jury in a random selection pro-
send both There, Rubin elaborated on his cess yesterday before deliberation
dents and view that "the jails are going to began in order to reach the num-
sachers of have to be torn down." ber of 12 jurors required by law.a
xt Thurs- "Everything in this country is rf j e
tee meet- built around its jail system," said
r the de- Rubin. "I'm for doing anything Q}u , o 0 ilty .
against it." Lt
day cur- R u b i n characterized Timothy. G.E
tings are Leary's escape from jail last year1 Inl in. n cident
ot be any as the "biggest victory" recently
ontingent against the system. Some helpful (Continued from Page 1)
led, how- tactics could be similar to Rubin's berg would attempt to assault s.
uld defi- disruption of the David Frost tele- 6'2" police officer.
Ida. vision show last year, which Rubin
is quite said was useful because of the The defense also cited what Els-
publicity it generated. enberg's attorney called "discrep -
_____________ __________ancies" between the accounts of

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14

Kent jury report

1 4

i
.
f

(Continued from Page 1)
that the report endangered their
jobs.
He said the jury violated its oath
of secrecy in asserting in the re-
port that witnesses before it had
"fairly represented" events at Kent
and that the witnesses "indicted
an effort at complete impartiality.'
Thomas said the jury further
violated the oath by asserting that
it had examined various reports
and "all pertinent information and
Air raidshi
Indochina
(Continued from Page 1)
positions across the Mekong River
from Phnom Penh yesterday, but
most battlefields near the capital
were quiet after three days of
sharp fighting.
Although the attacks have been
stepped up and there is fear
among many senators that more
increases may exceed the limits of
the Cooper-Church amendment,
there was general agreement that
the administration has ,up till now
kept within the technical , limits
of the amendment.
When asked about fears on the
part of Congressmen that the U.S.
could become involved in a new
Vietnam in Cambodia, Rogers re-
plied, "I don't think that is pos-
sible".
Senate Foreign Relations com-
mittee member George Aiken tR-
Ver) also cited the likelihood of a
strong public reaction in stating
that while apprehensive, he doubts
there will be an expanded U.S. in-
volvement in Cambodia.
"The uproar in this country
would make last May seem like a
Sunday school picnic," Aiken told
reporters yesterday. g
Meanwhile, the Italian govern-
ment has notified Washington of
its "anxiety" over an increase of
U.S. bombing in North Vietnam,
Foreign Ministry Undersecretary
Angelo Salizzoni told the Chamber
of Deputies yesterday.
He said the U.S. government
had been informed "in the most
opportune manner and way" of
Italian anxiety. Salizzoni added
that Italy believed the bombing
would not help a negotiated set-
tlement of the Vietnam war.
*i

evidence . . . in detail" when. some
reports were not introduced as
evidence and some were not read
in their entirety by the jury.
He ruled that the assertions of
the report might have an adverse
effect on prospective P o r t a g e
County jurors and that the con-
tinued official existence of the re-
port could "irreparably damage"
the right of the 25 indicted to a
fair trial.
No trial date has been set for
those indicted.
"It was my opinion we were to
issue a report," said Robert Hast-
ings, the Ravenna insurance brok-
er who was the jury foreman.
"Frankly, I didn't think that
report was prejudicial to any trials
and I still feel that way. We sim-
ply were trying to evaluate what
we thought went on there."
Thomas noted that former Gov.
Rhodes' call for the jury appeared
to have instructed the panel to
determine the causes of unrest at
Kent, but "the scope of a gover-
nor's call cannot enlarge the,
power of a special grand jury."
Thomas said he found no evi-

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLE TIN
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1971
DayCalendar
International World's Fair: Residen-
tial College, noon to midnight, Var-
iety Show, 2, 3:30, 7 and 9 p.m.
Astronomy Colloquium: Dr. E. Upton,
UCLA, "Fundamental Determinations of
Absolute Magnitudes on the Zero-age
Main sequence," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4
p.m.
Rive Gauche: :Internat'l Folk Dance,
Barbour Gym, 8 p.m.
Hockey: Mich. vs. Duluth, M i c h.
Coliseum, 8 p.m.
Sch. of Music: University Woodwind
Quintet, School of Music Recital Hali,
8 p.m.
University Players: "Timon of Ath-
ens," Trueblood, 8 p.m.
Literature, Science & Arts: P. Teller,
Univ. of Ill., "Epistemic Possibility," W.
Conf. Rm., Rackham, 8 p.m.
Placement }

exper. preferred, but not nec. (Taylor),
Harper Row Publishers, college trav-
eler for Ann Arbor area, degree w it h
good g.p.a., no exper. nee.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 S.B.A. (lower level)
Interviews at SPS, register for inter-
views by phone or in person.
FEB. 1
Good Humor Co., Detroit, interview-
ing 9 to 5, a job with good pay.
FEB. 3
Camp Tamarack, Detroit Fresh A i r
Society, interivewing 9 to 5; c a b i n
counselors, specialists in watrfront, arts
and crafts, nature campcraft, tripping,
dramatics, dance, puppetry, counselors
for pioneer and outpost camping, unit
and assistant unit supervisors, c a s e-
workers, nurses, truck-bus drivers,
cooks assts.
FEB. 4
Camp Tamarack.
Announcements: for further info.
check with Summer Placement Serv-
ices.
Final exam on Summer Jobs in Fed.
Agencies, Mar. 13; application must be
in Washington by Feb. 3; applications
available at SPS.
Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield
Village. Interview Schedule available for
working as guides. in Food Service, as
cashiers or groundsman.
General Notices
Third Annual Mich. Conference on
A p p i i e d Linguistics: Angell Hall,
through Jan. 30.
Attention Freshmen & Sophomores
"in LSA (fewer than 55 hrs by May '71):
Make advanced classification appoint-
ments starting Feb. 3; no forms will
be turned in before Mar. 8; have one
or two alternative course selections
ready; time schedules will be available
sometime in first week of March.
I

officers testifying for the prose-
cution.
Prosecuting Attorney John Huss
said however that the details of
the police accounts were not "as
important as the fact"that Eisen-
berg had attempted to block th(;
camera and had subsequently
jumped on the back of the police-
man.
The jury of four women and
two men deliberated for two and
a half hours before bringing in
the verdict of guilty.
No date for sentencing has been
set pending a decision by Eison-
berg whether to appeal.

we pinpoint the dotted dress shirt
as big fashion news for men. . .
Creighton Shirtmakers' crisp
Avril rayon/cotton blend shirt with
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dence of bad faith prosecution by 1 3200 S.A.B.
the state in the Kent cases, as had These Ann Arbor area jobs listed with
us this week. Other listings from many
been alleged by the plaintiffs. part of country on file in our office;
Portage County Common Peace further info. at Placement Services.
Judge Edwin Jones, under whose Battle Creek Community Hosp., staff
authority the jury operated, re- pharmacist, new grad is fine, comple-
fusedcommet ontion of intership preferred.
fused comment on yesterday's+ General Cable Corp., cost and bud-
action. get supervisor, BBA acctg. major. 3-5
Craig Morgan, Kent State stu- yrs exper in manufacturing acctg.,
dent body president and one of the supv. exper. required. (Cass City).
Carriage Galley, interior decorator,
25 indicted, said the report's dis-
missal "doesn't make any differ--
ence,"
"You're not going to tell Portage
County people to forget the report.
The report did its damage al-
ready," said Morgan who was in-
dicted on second degree riot
charges. :
Dr. Thomas Lough, a Kent State ,k
faculty member indicted on a".
charge of inciting to riot, said the *
decision was "a substantial vic--
tory, but I think it's too early to'
tell what the implications of the
decision are in my case and the
other 24."

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