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January 27, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 $1.500

HELD OVER
BY POPULAR
DEMAND!
11CATC 1122
IS THE MOST
MOVING THE MOST
INTELLIGENT, THE MOST
HUMANE - OHTO HELL
WITH IT! - IT'S THE
BEST AMERICAN FILM
I'VE SEEN THIS YEAR!"
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES
tAliMn muEmNmt~fmvimmS NtVwIt
A MiKE NICHOLSFILM
ALANARKIN
TONIGHT'S SHOWS:
7 and 9
rna w
II 1

page three

a4ire

SI~43IIUI

ai

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-055-

Wednesday, January 27, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

news0bries
By The Associated Press

Topic
rec. artists
THE
High
Level
Ranters

LAST 2

DAYS

"the best folk group in
England."
-MICHAEL COONEY

A BIPARTISAN, session-opening drive for a Senate rules
change suffered a severe setback yesterday at the hands of Vice
President Spiro Agnew.
The rules change would have made it easier to halt filibusters.
Agnew said he is going to stick with the precedents and turn over
to the Senate for decision the constitutional issues involved in the
rules fight.4
The result was to put supporters of a rules change on notice that
they will have to muster a two-thirds majority to break a filibuster
by opponents.
THE APOLLO 14 ASTRONUATS climbed aboard spaceship
trainers today to practice a new landing technique intended to
guide them to a pinpoint landing in one of the roughest areas of
the moon, the craggy Fra Mauro highlands.
Upon reaching the moon the astronauts will set up a nuclear-
powered science station and collect rocks which might hold clues to
the moon's origin.
Two nights ago a small leak was detected in a hydraulic pack-.
age associated with one of the rocket's engines. The package was re-
moved and the defective parts replaced. Launch officials said the
countdown would be unaffected. A crowd of 500,000 is expected to be
present at the take-off scheduled for 3 p.m. Sunday.
* * *
SOUTH VIETNAMESE and American forces last night joined B
the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese is a cease fire in Vietnam
to celebrate Tet, the lunar near year.
The Saigon government began the Year of the Boar with a pro-j
posal that all sick and wounded prisoners of war be freed by both sides.
Calling this a "decisive year for peace," President Nguyen Van
Thieu predicted the Communists would try to take over the South
by political maneuvers because they could not win on the battlefield.
Thieu's emphasis on the elections suggests he may be opening a bid
for a second term as president.
* * * wh
THE VATICAN NEWSPAPER accused the government ofIm
Guinea of massacre yesterday for executing four political Ro
prisoners.Un
Sources in the West African country reported by telephone that to
Ito t
four of the 58 persons awaiting execution for plotting to overthrow abo
President Sekou Toure had been hanged on a main street in the capi- plo
tal, Conakry. All four had been leading officials in Toure's government.
'PROTECT KIDS'
Jaycee 'andits' inab d4

-Associated Press

MI1*11s attacks
Nixon sfund.
sharing plan
WASHINGTON ca--President Nixon's plan for sharing
federal revenues with local governments is wasteful, unfair
to areas most in need and likely to force a general tax in-
crease, Rep.. Wilbur D. Mills, (D-Ark), told the House yester-
day.
Mills, chairman of the House Ways and Means Commit-
tee which will consider the $16 million tax-sharing program,
reserved an hour of House time for a detailed criticism of the
plan, which amounted to his reply to Nixon's address. The
President's State of the Union speech was primarily devoted
to promoting the idea.

Wilbur DA Mills

d.,

ERRIGAN CASE:

I st American
Tour

" .. alternately raucous
and sensitive . . . but
always a slam bang eve-
ning of first rate enter-
tainment."
--LONDON
TIMES

KAMA "
SUTRAW

NEXT WEEK-

JOHN
COHEN

(of the NEW
LOST CITY RAMBLERS)
9:36 .604

MEW
t

THE MOTION PICTUREf
KAMA SUTRA SEEN BY /
MILLIONS OF MEN AND
WOMEN IN EUROPE
AND ASIA IS NOW I
FREE TO BE SHOWN
IN THE UNITED STATES...
ANSWERS QUESTIONS EVEN A MAN AND
WIFE DON'T DARE ASK EACH OTHER!
O.E TO TH.
KAMA SUTRA
1 WANT TOSHNOW"OU UOM.THINI..In..~
A GC fTIfltM-ww..-.-w..%08fO t AEG(R .0d RICHA*RD R.l
ro.*i*0iR SCMIOT -Ao-E-t.fx pr B~dtt C oI -
Shows at 7:15 and 9:00
0 P;PTH POrMu
FH'TN uI a AT'rnspYv
lii OOWNTOvmI ANN AROR
LLJINFORMATION 751-9700I
STARTS FRI DAY
DOWNHILL RACER
and LOVING

I

Grand jury jais nun
for refusal to testify
HARRISBURG, Pa. (A)-A nun York City, was held in contempt
o charged the federal govern- of court by U.S. District Judge
nt tapped telephones within the R. Dixon Herman after she failed
man Catholic Church in the to testify. She had been granted
ited. States and Rome was or- immunity by the court on two oc-
red jailed yesterday for failing casions.
testify before a U.S. grand jury Sister Jogues was named a co-
out an alleged bomb-kidnap conspirator in the case against
t. six persons charged with plotting
Sister Jogues Egan, 52, New to kidnap presidential adviser
Henry Kissinger and blow up tun.-
nels in Washington on Feb. 22.
Herman ordered her held without
bond, but said she could get out
of jail as soon as she agreed to
testify "within the life of the
rus grand jury." The jury could sit
up to 18 months.
etting the dealers and they'd At the same time the govern-
ist get more." ment attempted to seek immunity
Describing the operation, the for three other grand jury wit-
o-chairmen said most of the nesses, but Herman recessed court
rug suppliers "were in our age until Wednesday morning.
roup-that's why the Jaycees Indicted by the grand jury
ere able to move about among Jan. 12, were the Rev. Philip Ber-
lem once they got identified rigan, now serving a.sentence at
s being big buyers." Danbury, Conn. for destroying
Some of the guys sat in on draft records; Eqbal Ahmad, a
ot parties," they said. "None Pakistani graduate student; ,the
ver used any of the drugs. Revs. Neil McLaughlin and Jo-
They undertook the project, seph Wonderoth, and Anthony
ail said, because most Jaycees Scobdick, a former priest, all of
ave children and would "sure Baltimore; and Sister Elizabeth
ate to see any of our kids on McAlister of Tarrytown, New York.
is junk." IAll but Father Berrigan are free
on bond ranging up to $60,000. His
The place to meet brother, the Rev. Daniel Berri-
NTERESTING people gan, also in Danbury on the draft
records charge, was named as a
co-conspirator.
Herman ordered Monday that,
the six defendants be arraigned
here at 11 a.m. Feb. 8.

L

In an obvious effort to counter-
act pressure on congressmen by
governors and local officials, Mills
listed states he said would gain
and those he expects to lose under
various possible ways of imple-
menting the program.
"If the purpose of revenue shar-
ing is to meet the needs of our
economy today, then revenue shar-
ing is a poor and wasteful means
of attaining those ends." Mills
stated.
"Under any of the formulas
that have been developed so far,
substantial funds are given to
states and localities where there
is little or no need, as well as to
those where there is need." The
most likely effect of sharing reve-
nue, he continued, would be to
raise federal taxes. If this were
done, he said, available informa-
tion "suggests that the distribu-
tional. effects of revenue sharing
would hurt most the urban states
where we hear most about the
need for revenue sharing, includ-
ing Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania
and New York.
Mills criticized mainly the por-
tion of the Nixon proposal calling
for distribution of $5 billion a year
with no strings tied.
Nixon suggested also that $11
billion more be shared with the
stipulation that the states use it
in specified general areas like ed-
ucation. They would develop their
own programs. All but $1 billion of
this $10 billion would be diverted
from present specific categorical
federal air programs.
Mills indicated some sympathy
with the block grant approach.
But he also said the likelihood of
$15-billion federal deficits "at
least should flash a caution light
for us to go slow with these pro-
posals for giving away federal
revenues.
"Myconcern is that once this
road is begun, where does it end?"
Mills said. "Once the $5 billion or
so is obtained in this manner,
what could be more natural than
at some future time to demand in
the strongest terms possible, fur-
ther increases in funds available.
"What worries me most about
not imposing taxes at the same
level of government responsible for
the expenditures is that this means
there is no balancing of priorities
between taxing and spending."

Nixon pushes
for renewed
action on bills
WASHINGTON (MP - President
Nixon asked Congress yesterday
to enact quickly 40 administration
bills that languished in 1970.
But he deferred explicit appeals
for action on two of his main tat -
gets: increased Social Security
payments and welfare reform.
In his first special message of
the new year, Nixon acknowledged
some of the 40 measures have
been revised this, year to meet
legitimate concerns expressed by
members of the Congress.
One of the major proposals in
the package would provide $1.5
billion by mid-1972 to school dis-
tricts facing racial desegregation
problems.
"I believe," said Nixon, "that
the items of unfinished business I
propose today merit the prompt
and careful consideration of the
Congress. I believe they are good
measures."
The presidential message did
not encompass all the items he
failed to get from the 1970 Con-
gress.
The President said he will sub-
mit separate messages later to
cover strikes creating national
emergencies; S o c i a 1 Security
amendments; bail reform; aid for
higher education; reform of the
draft; and steps toward creating
all-volunteer armed forces.
Nixon cited also-but did not
list among his 40 submissions-
"one especially urgent item of un-
finished business which I proposed
to the 91st Congress: welfare re-
form."
"In fairness to the taxpayers, to
the communities, and also to the
children, we can afford to delay
no longer in discarding the pres-
ent system and replacing it with
a new one," he said.
House Republican Leader Ger-
ald R. Ford of Michigan said all
the Nixon proposals are meritor-
ious and Congress should move
swiftly on them.

WENATCHEE, Wash.(YP)-Vol- in the area from marijuana to g
unteer undercover men, all opium." ju
members of the local Junior The Jaycees, given the code
Chamber of Commerce, say a name "Bandits" by the sheriff's cc
10-month investigation turned office, learned to identify drugs, dr
up an "unlimited supply" of il- how to "make a buy" that would gr
legal drugs in this farming com- stand up in court, and met users w
munity of 18,000. and pushers on their own th
The investigation by the Jay- ground.
cees, in conjunction with the The "Bandits" worked in two- p
Chelan County sheriff's office man teams, three nights a week,
resulted in about 50 arrests. seeking to penetrate the local
Larry Graybeal, co-chairman drug rings. V
of the Jaycee drug abatement The plan, a spokesman said, hf
program, said the undercover "was to knock off the whole- hf
men were able to "buy anything salers. Otherwise, we'd just be th
Delta Sigma Delta
_ -- fI!- -I/-Dental Fraternity

Tlir i Ai mPi iin~

lilt LAW LLUD ireasurer is pulling nis
hair out because the social chairman is
giving away a free ski trip at the
"GIVEAWAY MIXER"

''LIVE
"OPEN'' BAND"
FRI., JAN. 29
6-9 p.m.
1502 HILL STREET

I

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NE-AC TV RENTALS
662-5671

Law Club Lounge
9
No Charge to Co-Eds.

Thurs., Jan. 28, 1971
-12 P.M.
A G-G Production

*I

c

IOiI

The Polus Hofhaimer
Ensemble
8-voice choir, 4 recorders
4 crumhorns, mute coronette
guitar, percussion
PERFORM ING
RENAISSANCE
DANCE MUSIC
plus a short election of officers
Refreshments (including CHILI)
ofterwa rds
THURS., JAN. 28-8 pn..
SO. QUAD, W. LOUNGE
EVERYONE WELCOMET
Positively no musical knowledge
needed ! !
Further info: 764-7638
ATTENTION: Look for the
story on the Bach Club in the
Daily, page 2, sometime this
week.
Starting the week after next,
Bach Club Daily ads will gener-
ally occur only on Thursday.

i

'i1

I

For the student body:
'~Genuine
SAuthentic
' Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 46
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

Really interested
in Film Making?
GENERAL MEETING
Basement Canterbury House
Wednesday, January 27-7:30
TOMORROW NIGHT

l

F,

THE
SeaTrain*
IS COMING
AND SO IS
DAVID BROMBERG

STUDENTS FOR THE PEACE TREATY
and
LIFE CULTURE WEEK
PRESENT

I

I

i

I

CINEMA II

JOHN FROWNS
Speaking on the Peoples Peace Treaty
JANE FONDA
Winter Soldier Investigation
TOM HAYDEN
Chicago Conspiracy 10 Defendant
ARCHIE SINGHAM
Third World Liberation
REV. PHILIP LINDON

THIS FRIDAY
JANUARY 29

HILL AUDITORIUM
8:30 P.M.

j :v
::
::_;..

Walt Disney's
Alice in Wonderland
Saturday, 7 p.m. and 9p.m.

TICKETS: $2.50, $3.00, $3.50 On sale at UNION (CELLAR),
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL and DISCOUNT RECORDS

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