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January 26, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

len THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 26, 1971

'U'issues.
nepotism
guld eines
(Continued from Page 1)
demic Affairs or the Personnel
Office, as appropriate."
Vice President Smith said last
night this would prevent under-
utilization of one relative if, for
example, a husband and wife ap-
plied to the same department.
Jean Tashian of PROBE said
last night she believed the policy
contained no major departure
from present practice. "I don't
see it as much of a change," she
said, "except in requiring the ap-
proval of the administrative head
and the vice president."
The University statement con-
cludes, "In any event, in accord-
ance with general University
policy, there shall be no discrimi-
nation based upon sex in appoint-
ment, promotion, wages, hours or
other conditions of employment."
Smith said the policy on nepo-
tism was sent to HEW early this
month. The University agreed on
Dec. 8 to submit a written policy
within 30 days as part of a pro-
gram President Robben Fleming
said would satisfy all but two of
HEW's objections to the Univer-
sity's first plan.
The original plan did not meet
requirements necessary for the
University to be "awardable" for
federal contracts.
University Prof. Richard K. Os-
born has been appointed as t h e
first holder of the Paul G. Goebel
Chair in Advanced Technology it'
the Engilneering college.
Funds for the endowed profes-
sorship were given two years ago
by friends of Regent Paul G. Goe-
bel to honor his service to the
University as an alumnus, as a
member of the governing board
and as national director of the $55
Million Program, which raised~
more than $72 million in capital
funds for the University. Goebel
is a 1923 graduate of the college.

Judge rules against
govt. wiretap in trial

Really interested
in Film Making?
GENERAL MEETING
Basement Canterbury House
Wednesday, January 27-7:30

(Continued from Page 1)
organizations to attack or subvert
the existing structure of govern-
ment' (as the attorney general
argued) cannot be in and of it-
self a crime,"
Following the decision, U.S. At-
torney Ralph Guy said the pro-
secution requested and was grant-
ed a 48 hour postponement of the
trial. He explained that the At-
torney General will have to decide
within that time whether to make
the disclosures, dismiss the case,
or appeal the decision.
As a result of the decision, the
defense now has a right to hear
the illegal tapes, if the govern-
ment chooses to continue the case.
From this the defense can deter-
mine whether any evidence which
might be used by the prosecution
in the case was obtained through
the tapes and would therefore be
illegal. To do this, the court or-
dered an evidentiary hearing at
the conclusion of the trial.
Defense Attorney William
Kunstler said he thought the de-
cision was a "great opinion and a
victory for the people of the U.S."
Carl Cohen, chairman of t h e
local American Civil Liberties Un-
ion, (ACLU), said "the ACLU"
has been pressing for this result
and is most gratified in it."
According to Defense Attorney
Neal Bush, a similar ruling w a s
made by Federal District J u d g e
Warren Ferguson last month in a
case involving Black Panthers on
the West Coast. Bush suggested
that this previous ruling may have
influenced yesterday's opinion in
Detroit.
Kunstler noted that Judge Jul-
- |k

ius Hoffman had come to the op-
posite conclusion in the Chicago
Conspiracy trial. "This now puts
the government in a bind", he
said, "because if it gives in here,
it will hurt its position in Chi-
cago. If it decides not to give
in," he continued, it will either

46

have to abandon prosecution here
or else take time out for appeal."
Last month, in response to a;-
defense request to see any tapes
that had been made relevant to
the case, Keith ordered the Jus--2 courses for beginners and intermediates
tice Dept. to submit any such '
tapes. When tapes were submit-
£tatin toayJanuary 26-7 p m
ted it then became apparent that p -
there had in fact, been wiretap- Courses run for 10 weeks
ping.
Also accused in the case are two Small Ballroom 2nd floor Michigan Union
other White Panthers, John Sin-
clair and Jack "Waterhouse" For- HURRY-Space Limited
est. All three are accused of con-
spiracy and Plamondon is further
accused of carrying out the actual D aily C lassifieds G et Results
bombing.
95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
FAST REA DING IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN!

so

-Associated Press
Railroad dispute meeting
Principals in the rail dispute meet yesterday in Washington, D.C., in an effort to head off a strike
threat. From left are W.J. Usery, assistant labor secretary; J.W. Jennings, vice president of the
United Transportation Union; Chairman George Ives of the National Mediation Board, and J.P. Hiltz,
Jr., chief industry negotiator, foreground.
$14 MILLION:
Administration seeks funds
for capital outlay budget

All those wo completed courses held this
past year at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved
speeds of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same
or increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rates.
SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
-save hours, use your time more efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster than
you do now
-improve your comprehension and increase your
enjoyment of reading material
at a cost less than HALF that of nearly all
other commercial reading courses!

b
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rid'
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.
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(Continued from Page 1)
the University for last year total-
ed $12,380,345. However, the state
appropriation for fiscal year 1970-
71 was only $3,380,845.
If the University is successful in
its $14,041,500 capital outlay re-
quest, projects listed for general
educational facilities for 1971-72
will be:

Panther defense reaction
to wire tap ruling mixed

(Continued from Page 1)
the defense requesting the right
to question jurors about possible
prejudices they might have toward
the defendants and their life
style. Presently, only the judge
can question the jurors. Keith is
expected to rule on this motion on
Thursday, when the trial resumes.
Bush talked of the need to "re-
educate" the jurors, "turning
around everything they've read in
PhRom Penh
under attack
(Continued from Page 1)
Cambodia's Highway 4, the main
supply route from Phnom Penh
to the port of Kompong Som on
the Gulf of Siam.
Meanwhile, anti - war senators
blasted Secretary of State William
R o g e r s for what Sen. Frank
Church (D-Idaho) called "an
abrupt and drastic change in U.S.
policy in Cambodia."
Commenting on U.S. bomber and
helicopter support of Cambodian
and South Vietnamese troops,
Church added that he and other
members of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee would like
"to learn the facts" of actual U.S.
involvement in Cambodia.
Committee chairman J. W. Ful-
bright (D-Ark.) has asked Rogers
to testify in a closed session. State
Department s o u r c e s confirmed,
Rogers' acceptance.
In another development, the
U.S. military command reported
that American troop strength in
South Vietnam increased last week
for a second straight week.
TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

the straight press" about the youth
culture.
Gaines said although the govern-
ment already has John Sinclair
in jail for possession of marijuana,
it wants to convict him of a vio-
lent crime. She charged that it is
the government's intention to
"discredit the entire youth culture
and movement" by implying that
bombing, rather than marijuana,
is an essential part of the counter
culture.
Gaines and Bush also questioned
the sanity of the government's
key witness David Valler, and ex-
plained that Keith had turned
down a defense motion to have
Valler undergo a psychiatric
examination.
Valler has admited that at one
point he hadbeen using LSD
daily. The defense alleges that
during that time, Valler traversed
Detroit asking for support in his
campaign to become President of
the United States.
Bush said that Valler actually
believed at the time that he would
be elected on his "peacaand love"
platform, and at times would ask
people what he should do when
he assumed office.
The workshop, attended by
about 25 people, was a part of Life
Culture Week, a series of teach-
ins about the emerging counter
culture and the government's re-
action to it.

-$1,700,000 to correct short-
comings in areas to handicapped
student requirements, safety code
provisions and vertical transporta-
tion systems in the General Li-
brary;
-$1,360,000 to renovate labo-
ratories and mechanical systems
in the Natural Science Bldg.;
-$600,000 to develop cost analy-
sis and develop renovation pro-
grams and timetables for general
science facilities;
-$50,000 to examine potential
reuses of the old Architecture and
Design Bldg. and to plan complete
renovation.
-$600,000 for campus-wide de-
velopment in support and service
systems;
-$365,000 for a classroom and
office building already under con-
struction and scheduled to be open
this August;
-$3,000,000 for construction of
the proposed new Architecture and
Design building on North Campus;
-$1,200,000 for the engineering
building authorized by the Legis-
lature last spring;
-$300,000 to continue prelimi-
nary planning for a science build-
ing for psychology;
-$400,000 to study possible re-
use, remodeling and replacement
of the Chemistry Bldg.;
-$100,000 for the North Cam-
pus general library; and
-$100,000 to initiate long-range
In a story apublished last
Sunday, The Daily incorrectly
reported that Georgia Water-
mulder, Placement Services
career planner, said that S an
Francisco is a good place to
look for work. Watermulder
actually included San Francisco
in the group of cities that are
bad for job seekers.

planning and study for a library'
systems master plan.
University capital outlay re-
quests for projects listed under
health sciences are:
-$1,000,000 to begin renovation
of open wards in University Hos-
pital;
-$150,000 to continue prelimi-
nary planning for the long-range
Medical Center development; and
-$500,000 to begin planning
studies for a new Mental Retarda-
tion building.
Funding requests for the Dear-
born Campus are:
-$200,000 for the Library and
Learning Resources Center to pro-
vide for the first stages of build-
ing a library resource center pro-
gram and associated teaching and
research training facilities;
-$200,000 to begin preliminary
planning for a general instruc-
tional and laboratory building;
and
-$50,000 to Campus Develop-
ment, Support and Service sys-
tems to correct roads and parking
shortcomings.
Convention
sets platform
(Continued from Page 1)
An addition to the police plat-
form, established Saturday, called
for a police review board to set
p o li c e policy and investigate
charges made against the police.
The board would also be designed
to regulate the activities of "out-
side" law agencies operating with-
in Ann Arbor.
The convention will conclude
this coming Saturday with the
nomination of candidates, the
naming of the party, and the de-
termination of the party's struc-
ture and function.

71

i"-i

Bring a book to a free, live demonr;tration of the reading skills which will be taught in a GUARANTEED
course offered this semester.
Demonstration This Week-Tues. & Thurs., Jan. 26, 28
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

t!

c> _:
t
'
':
'>
'
'*,,,
::. rr::.. >

" JANE FONDA
. EAST COAST
CONSPIRACY TO
SAVE LIVES
" ARCHIE SIN6HAM

I

COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT
Fine Food
Chops, Steaks, & Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open-
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m. till 3 a.m.-Fri.-Sat.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Catering
769-2330
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results !

And They Iz
ALL KOMING*
SOONER THAN
YA THINK
CCI ADE V Tall 133I AM% }

I

4

Tues., Jan. 26
DRUGS IN ANN ARBOR
Dr. Edward Pierce, M.D., Matt Lampe of Drug Help, Inc., Lynn Rosenfield of
Ozone House, and Leni Sinclair of the White Panther Party.
8:30 p.m. Assembly Hall
Michigan Union Basement
Wed., Jan. 27
WAR CRIMES, THE CIA, THIRD WORLD LIBERATION
MOVEMENTS,& PEOPLES' PEACE TREATY
Participants will include Chicago Conspiracy Trial defendants
Tom Hayden and John Froines, actress Jane Fonda, Political Sci-
ence Prof. Archie Singham, Sister Susan Cordes andd Father
Phillip Lindon S.S.J., a member of the Black Clergy Caucus and a
close friend of Phillip Berrigan. ($1.00 contribution at the door.)
7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
Michigan Union Ballroom
Thursday, Jan. 28
NEW LIFE NIGHT
(An Evening of Talk and A Night of Action)
Among the participants will be author Mark Lane, Tom
Hayden, Genie Plamondon of the W.P.P., attorney Ken-
neth Cockrel, Sister Susan Cordes and Father Phillip Lin-
don S.S.J. who were members of the East Coast Conspir-
acy to Save Lives and are close associates of the Berri-
gons, a Vietnam Veteran from the Winter Soldier War
Crimes Investigation, and others. (Tickets are $1.50
available Monday through Thursday at the Fishbowl and
at the Michigan Union, and on Thursday at the door.)

"t.1

1

y," a

II1

RUSH
STATE STREET
FRATERNITIES
Beta Theta Pi
604 S.State

(FEBRUAKY 6, HILL AUD.
SHOE SALE
Final week of the clearance of
Men's and Women's fine foot-
wear.
Still a good choice of sizes
and styles to select from
Store hours 9:00-5:30 daily

I f- I

00

8:30 p.m.

Hill Auditorium

FREE JOHN. PUN and JACK

I'l

I

.

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