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January 23, 1971 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-23

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 23, 1971

I

'U' COMMITTEES:
GA seeks more representation

Regents OK talks
on N. Campus land
(Continued from Page 1) May and June in conjunction with
4ne1- osng. 1 ...... -4 4 u nTsivrsity{F

(Continued from Page 1)
Marrone says SGC does not ef-
fectively represent the graduate
community, despite the fact that
graduate students are eligible for
election to SGC and there has
been at least one graduate stu,.
dent on SGC for each of the past
five years.
"Graduate Assembly is not striv-
ing for a flat-out unnegotiable 40
per cent representation," Mar-
rone explains. "It should depend
on the nature of the committee
and its pertinence to graduate
students. In some cases it should
be less than 40 per cent and in
some cases greater," he continued.
Marrone adds, "there is no
representative body on this cam-
pus more indicative of true stu-
dent opinion than Graduate As-
sembly. We think that GA repre-
sentatives encompass a wide va-
riety of backgrounds and view-
points."
SGC President Marty Scott
calls the issue of representation
"one of the most important issues
facing students governments to-
day." He says since SGC is the
student government for the whole
University, committee appoint-
ments should be made at its dis-
cretion."
Scott says SGC makes it a mat-
ter of policy to contact other stu-
dent governments at the Univer-
sity when making appointments
to committees which affect the
student bodies which those partic-
ular governments represent./
"I have my real doubts about

how representative of the grad I
student body GA really is," Scott
adds "But it is not really helpful
for student governments to be
fighting about this sort of thing.
It can only come out in favor of
the Administration."
Scott explains meetings are in
the process of being scheduled for
early next month between SGC,
GA and other student govern-
ments within the University.
Robert Knauss, vice-president
for student services, has an-
nounced that GA will be consulted
in nominating graduate students
to all boards within his office.
GA wants the same policy en-
acted for all committees of the
University, for example those ap-
pointed by Senate Assembly.
Knauss says he is "sympathetic"
to GA's concern about the ap-
pointments, but "would not like

to be pinned down to a quota" of
graduate students on committees.
"So far we have left the ques-
tion of representation up to vari-
ous committees as they draft their
legislation," said Weinberg. "Some
have asked that it go through only
GA or only SGC or both."
Weinberg cited the current pro-
posal for a University-wide judic-
iary as an example. The current
plan, approved by Senate Assem-
bly, includes a provision that a
certain proportion of the judges
should be graduate students. How-
ever, these graduates must be
screened by SGC.
Acknowledging that Senate As-
sembly has been getting letters
from GA concerning the matter of
40 per cent representation on
committees, Weinberg said the
faculty body plans to take no ac-
tion on the matter for the time
being.

Coi

Pt

,4
it
t
f
i
c
1
1

station has no broadcast license
and is only piped into the dormi-
tories and University Towers.
Under thegproposal, the .now
self -supporting s t a t i o n would
cease to sell advertising and would:
function directly under the aus-
pices of the University. However,
it would continue to be managed
and edited by students.
The debate centered around who
would exercise editorial judgment
over the content of the broadcast
material. Regent Lawrence Linde-
mer (R-Stockridge) also objected
to the proposal on the grounds
that he saw no good reason why
WUOM, the University's profes-
sional FM station, could not in-
corporate student broadcasts.
"I want to know who's really go-
ing to be in control, what the
managerial structure is going to
be," said Regent William Cudlip
(R-Detroit). "This looks like it's
going to be an aerial Daily, and I
think we might want something
different," he said.
The proposal was tabled follow-
ing the discussion to enable the
Regents to gather more informa-
tion on the question.
Other debate at the meeting was
sparked by efforts of students liv-
ing in Northwood married - stu-
dent apartments to overturn an
earlier University decision requir-
ing each tenant to pay six dollars
per month to the Ann Arbor
school bdard in lieu of property
taxes. The issue had arisen last

the closing of the University
School.
At that time the Regents ap-
proved the collection of the
monthly charge, but actual pay-
ment to the board had been de-
layed until yesterday, pending an
attorney general's ruling on the
legality of the payments.
The rulings have never been
forthcoming, however, and yester-
day's action was an attempt to
test the legality by simply making
the first payment.
Finally, the Regents gave final
approval to a plan establishing an
extension of the Washtenaw legal
aid service to students. The serv-
ice would be available chiefly fog
students meeting standard county
indigency requirements and for
small claims cases.
The Regental action this month
was taken chiefly to clarify a
point raised at last month's meet-
tng in which fears were raised that
the service would be used to sue
the University for large sums or
to challenge major University pol-
icies.
The final proposal clarifies the
point by saying that "suits where
significant amounts of money are
involved and attorney fees norm-
ally would result, for examule,
suits challenging the University's
residency policies, or use of Uni-
versity funds, which if successful
would normally generate an at-
torney fee, would not be handled."

Nixon asks for sharing
federal funds with states,

UINTa
S..missing out
on some of the
SDAILIES because
- of delivery
. mistakes?
v I

(Continued from Page 1)
"health maintenance organiza-
tions."
Nixon said he would ask also
for more aid to medical schools
and "to greatly increase the num-
ber of doctors and other health
personnel. He also said he will seek
an extra $100 million "to launch
an intensive campaign to find a
cure for cancer."

Poice drug raids startle,
awaken youth community

(Continued from Page 1)
of the first three arrested werej
reduced yesterday from sale of
marijuana to possession of mari-
Juana and sale of LSD to posses-
sion of LSD.
Some of the youths involved in
the drug arrests credited the re-
duced bail to their criticism of
the raids. District Court Judge S.
J. Elden, however, said bail was
reduced because "we had an op-
portunity to investigate the mat-
ter."
Many of the arrested youths
also credit their strong criticisms
of the drug arrests with curtailing
further raids.
Police undercover agents, who
had been conducting surveillance
for months to use in the raid
were suspected by the youths tc
have many more warrants fo
people they didn't find during the

raid. Many who feared they were
named in unannounced warrants
have either gone "underground"
or have tightened security in their
living units.
Though police repeatedly deny
charges that the raids were related
to a recently proposed amendment
to city law that would reduce pen-
alties for marijuana possesison,
most of the youths see it as an
attempt to discredit the proposal
through a "scare" campaign.
Mayor Harris, who said he knew
nothing of the raid until after it
took place, expressed concern af-
ter criticism of the raid reached
his office.
By Wednesday, Harris had di-
rected Krasny to investigate re-
ports of police misconduct and has
begun soliciting statements from
witnesses to the alleged miscon-
duct.

Reaction from Congress on the
State of the Union address was
cautious. Republican support was
generally wile-spread, while Dem-
ocrats - though praising Nixon's
goals-predicted many proposals
will face stiff opposition.
Sen. John McClellan (D-Ark)
chairman of the Government Op-
erations Committee which will
handle Nixon's proposals to con-
solidate eight cabinet departments
into four, said "any time you try
to abolish or consolidate an es-
tablished agency of government,
you run into trouble."
He noted that former president
Lyndon Johnson sought to con-
solidate the Departments of Com-
merce and Labor but opposition
from both business and labor kille(
the proposal.
In the House, continued s1cep-
ticism about the President's reve-
nue sharing proposals was ex-
pressed by Rep. Wright Patman
(D-Tex.) chairman of the Bank-
ing and Currency Com.ittee
which handles urban and housing
legislation.
"I am still not convinced that
this is not just more shuffling of
existing funds and that in the enc
major federal programs will be
crippled to find the funds for this
revenue sharing," Patman said
Rep. Wilbur Mills (D-Ark.),
whose Ways and Means Commit-
tee will have to consider the reve-
nue sharing proposals, also has
been strongly critical of the Presi-
dent's program.

i

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