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January 23, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Saturday, January 23, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FORMER ARMY MEN

rage .fever

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits . . .. $6.98
(All Colors)
Bells.........$8.50
DENIM
Bush Jeans $10.00
Bells $8.00
Pre-Shrunk $7.50
Super Slims $7.00
CHECKMATE]
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Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

Agents admit spying at colleges

By The Associated Press
Former A r m y intelligence
agents have admitted spying on
student political meetings ad-
dressed by liberal speakers.
The recently discharged
agents say they took notes of
what the speakers said and de-
scribed crowd reaction in reports
to Army Intelligence Command
headquarters at Ft. Holabird,
Md.
Meanwhile, alarmed by re-
ports of Army spying on civil-
ians, 20 congressmen have pro-
FONDA
Rally/Benefit
UNION BALLROOM
January 27
8:00 P.M.
FROINES

posed a federal privacy law giv-
ing citizens a chance to know
about - and see - the files be-
ing kept on them.
Six former agents interview-
ed by The Associated Press in
Minnesota said their superiors
were intensely interested in ci-
vilian protest activities.
Earlier disclosures by agents
in other parts of the country
have fueled a growing contro-
versy over military surveillance
of civilian activity.
The six men said half a doz-
en Army men were in the au-
dience when Sen. Walter Mon-
dale (D-Minn.> addressed a col-
lege rally in October 1969.
And last spring, they said, two
disguised Army agents mingled
with students, taking pictures of
John Kenneth Galbraith a n d
the crowd when the noted econ-
omist appeared on the Univer-
sity of Minnesota campus,
The former agents said 95 per
cent of their w o r k with the
113th Military Intelligence re-
gional headquarters in Minne-
apolis involved routine security
CORRECTION
In reporting Thursday's
meeting of the Regents, The
Daily incorrectly termed Re-
gent Gerald Dunn (D-Lan-
sing) as newly elected. Regent
Dunn has been in office for two
years. He did not attend Thurs-
day's meeting.
- -r- -

checks on military personnel
and defense contractors.
However, they said the 113th:
-Built card files on between
5,000 and 8,000 individuals and
groups in the Minneapolis re-
gion;
-Filled a filing cabinet draw-
er with pictures of demonstra-
tions in which individuals were
circled, numbered, named and
cited in telex reports to the in-
telligence command at Ft. Hola-
bird; and
-Gained ready access to 'he
University of Minnesota admis-
sions office to c h e c k student
character references and finan-
cial records without first obtain-
ing university authorization.
Former agent George Lewis,
24, said he protested when his
command officer ordered him to
infiltrate the moratorium day
rally address by Mondale.
Lewis said he w e n t to the
meeting but slipped away after
noticing five other Army agents
mingling in the crowd, includ-
ing Lt. Col. Donald E. Mattson,
the regional commander.
Mattson refers all questions to
the Pentagon.
"I see this as becoming a na-
tional issue," he said. "As for
spying, that's a loosely u s e d
term. We don't spy. The FBI
would arrest us if we did. Spy-
ing is illegal."
Former agent Richard Kasson
said he frequently checked stu-
dent records at the University
of Minnesota admissions office.
Most times, he said the checks

- a

-

involved security clearances and
the subject had signed a waiver
authorizing the inspection.
But he said that as the ad-
missions office personnel got to
know him, he was allowed to
see records without showing the
waiver and sometimes looked in-
to the background of students
who had taken part in demon-
strations.
Earlier disclosures of military
investigation on campus caused
uneasiness a m o n g Minnesota
students.
The Student Association :s
contacting other universities to
alert them to what has happen-
ed there.
Backers of the legislation to
be proposed in Congress say cit-
izens need some recourse in the
face of massive information be-
ing collected by the government
through various interconnecting
data banks.
"Today, t h e average citizen
has no recourse and the reputa-
tion of countless numbers of de-
cent citizens are being threat-
ened or destroyed by malicious
and false information appearing
in the millions of dossiers held
by government agencies," says
Rep. Edward I. Koch.
The New York Democrat and
a bipartisan band of colleagues
from nine states entered legis-
lation Thursday to:
--Require all federal agencies
to notify persons of any per-
sonal files being maintained on
4 them, and
-Give a person a chance to
inspect his files and add, at his
own expense, any clarifying
statements he feels are required.
Exceptions to the disclosure
would be in cases where secrecy
is required for national security
and involving records retained
on a temporary basis for law
enforcement purposes.

Open Only to U of M Students, Faculty, Staff & Alumni
& immediate families
NASSAU
SPRING VACATION

-Associated Press
FORMER AGENT George Lewis of the Army Intelligence Command leaves the Federal Building in
Minneapolis, where the command's regional headquarters is located. Lewis said he was ordered to
infiltrate a moratorium day rally addressed by Sen. Walter Mondale of Minnesota.

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(Continued from Page 61 person for interview appt. announced Summer Intern Program,
programs leading to MBA, one year Jan. 25: Camp Wabikon, Canadian, details and applic. at SPS; applic. dead-
prog. for B'BA's, 2 yr prog. for under- coed. Will be here 9-5; openings include line Apr. 1, but for law students, Feb.
rad. liberal arts, sci., and engr. ma- gen. counselors and specialists in water- 15.
fors, evening grad. program. front, canoeing, crafts, drama, sailing. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield
Village, interview schedule avail. f o r
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS: working as guides, in. food service, as
212 S.A.B. (lower level) N.J. Dept. of Community Affairs have cashiers or groundsman.
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available at SPS. Phone or apply in 8"C vr:'"'.s"n^f: . ti4' ahr^"..
ORGANIZATION NOTICES
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ATT -MN
ATTENTION

Ageless Science of Yoga. Instruction
in the yoga exercises as taught by qual-
ified instructors. Sponsored by Self-
Realization Fellowship. Call Dale after
6:00 p.m. at 761-9825.
* * * *
Scottish Country Dancing for men
and women. Always open to beginners
- instruction provided. Every Thurs.,
7:30 p.m., WAB Gym.
* * - *
Enact Political Issue Committee
meeting - Tuesday, Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m.,
Room 2024 Nat. Res. Bldg. Plans for
this coming semester will be discussed.
All interested people welcome.
* * * *
"Legislative Action on Abortion a n d
Adoption" - 1971" will be discussed by
Mrs. Lorraine Beebe, Dr. 'David Oing-

ham, and representatives of COAC,
on Monday, Jan. 25, 7:30 p.m., at Ann
Arbor Public Library. The meeting is
sponsored by Zero Population Growth.
* * . *
UM Folk Dance Club meets every
Friday evening, 7:30 - 11:00 p.m. in
Barbour Gym. Teaching 7:30 - 9:00
p.m. Open to all.
* * * *
Bach Club meeting, Thursday, Jan.
28, 8:00 p.m., South Quad, West Lounge.
Renaissance Music, Paulus Hofhalmer
ensemble (8 voice choir, 4 recorders, 4
crumhorns, mute cornet, guitar and
percussion). Also short election of of-
ficers. Evelyone welcome! No music
knowledge needed. Meet interesting
people. Refreshments (including home-
made chili) afterwards. For further in-
formation call 7689-3003 or 764-7638.

1k

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SPECIALS ON

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(The Easy-Does-It Band)

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Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 764-0558

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FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND'
FOUNDATION

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3.25
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4.75
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6.50
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SALE
299
349
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State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-688 1
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "It's Your World, So It's Your
Mission !"
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS
Sunday, Jan. 24:
5:30 p.m.-Worship, Wesley Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program with Gay Liberation rep-
resentatives.
Thursday, Jan. 28:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion led by Ed-
ward McCracken, "Different Strokes for
Churchy Folks" (church vocations). Lunch
25c.
Friday, Jan. 29:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion led by Bart-
lett Beavin "The Historic Church." Lunch
25c.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxom, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-
"Values," Rev. Ronald C. Phillips.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Sermon by
Mr, Sanders.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11 :00 a.m.-Holy Communion/folk mass.
UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn Willi'om White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11:00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years),
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a n.-Morning Prayer.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Ave.
Alfred T. Scheins, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gammo Delta, Lutheran!

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