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January 21, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-21

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 21, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 21, 1971

.. -.

it

Michigan Tech: High atop
the college hockey world

i.

By JOEL GREER
With athletic budgets floun-
dering at many universities,
specialization in one collegiate
sport has become a popular pol-
icy.
Whereas many schools can-
not support major football pro-
grams, several small colleges
such as Jacksonville, Marquet-
te and St. Bonaventure feature
outstanding basketball p r 0-
grams. Schools in the northern
clime devote much of their
funds to ice hockey.
Four of the nine schools com-
peting in the Western Collegiate
Hockey Association conduct this
type of athletic program and
league leading Michigan Tech
heads up the list.
Located in the Upper Penin-
sula's "copper country" between
the tiny twin cities of Houghton
and Hancock, Michigan Tech-
nological University has little
else to offer in the winter
months besides collegiate hock-
ey. Temperatures fall unnerv-
10% Off
EVERYTHING
NOW at NOW
Student Book Service
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
'A Farah
Wright
'Tads
^ Sebring
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

ingly below zero and snow
depths are recorded in feet
rather than inches. It has lately
become a custom for students to
snow-mobile their way from
campus to the always packed
Dee Stadium.
THE 4700 STUDENTS, in-
cluding 700 co-eds, have always
had pride in their number one
attraction. Over the past three
years the student body has fund-
ed the construction of a new
3500-seat arena which should
be completed in time for next
season's opener.
Dee Stadium, the ancient fa-
cility now used by the Huskies,
seats an estimated 1600 a n d
tickets are practically impossi-
ble to get. In fact, there has
been a continuing controversy
between Michigan Tech officials
and the Houghton fire marshall
over attendance figures. The ac-
tual attendance, which seldom-
ly is under 2200 has never been
quoted.
Hockey has been played in
- Houghton since the turn of the
century and is regarded as the
birthplace of professional hock-
ey on the North American con-
tinent. James R. Dee, who has
been credited with starting the
Houghton hockey program, built
the "old Amphidrome" in 1902
along the shores of Portage Lake
so that hockey would have the
opportunity to grow as he felt
it would.
Sure enough, a professional
league formed in the Houghton
area in 1903 and the Huskies be-
gan collegiate competition in
1919.
TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
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662-5671

The original building was de-
stroyed in 1927 but was rebuilt
by Dee the following year. Nat-
urally, the name has been ap-
propriately changed to James R.
Dee Stadium.
Hockey at Michigan Tech has
a 1 w a y s been comparatively
strong, but the team didn't be-
come a national power until it
dominated the sport throughout
the last decade. Under present
coach J o h n MacInnes, the
Huskies have won four WCHA
championships including na-
tional crowns in 1961-62 a n d
1964-65. Tech last won the
WCHA crown during the 1968-
69 season.

4.

THIS YEAR'S Huskie
has been exceptionally
despite t h e graduation
seniors last spring.

squad
strong
of 11

Freshmen have filled key
holes in the Michigan Tech at-
tack and the offense has been
amazing.
In posting their 10-1 confer-
ence record, the Huskies have
averaged 5.6 goals p e r game.
"This year's squad is especially
offensive minded, and some-
times it's tough to k e e p the
reigns on them," Maclnnes ex-
pressed recently. "Our defense-
men can all carry the puck."
The team has molded into a
cohesive unit quicker than most
young squads and McInnes com-
pared this edition of the Husk-
ies with past ones. "This is def-
initely the best group I've had
here in the last five years."
Much of the speculation of
whether the Huskies could win
away from Dee Stadium dissap-
peared last weekend when they
swept both games f r o m the
stubborn Minnesota Gophers at
Minneapolis. Tech outlasted the
Gophers 6-2 Friday, and took a
penalty-marred 4-2 win on Sat-
urday.
In league competition, Michi-
gan Tech now has won seven
home encounters while taking

s -Djaiy-ThOmas R C OOi
A TRIO OF Michigan Tech Huskies rough up Michigan's Tom
Marra (5) in WCHA action last year. The Huskies, one of the
most physical teams in the WCHA, are currently leading the

league by 32 games. Last year,
Huskies taking the opener 6-2
two of three on the road. The
only loss was administered by
the Spartans at East Lansing.
Tech doesn't have it quite as
easy the rest of the way as
eight of its remaining twelve
conference games are away
from the friendly confines of
Dee Stadium.
The Huskies face their big-
gest test of the season this
weekend when they travel to
Duluth to meet the second-place
Bulldogs.
Minnesota-Duluth, which also
stresses hockey as it's primary

the Wolverines split with the
and losing the rematch 6-3.
sport, has already knocked off
the Huskies in the final of the
Christmas tournament, 6-1.
The Bulldogs, supporting a 7-
5 league record and now three
and a half games behind the
Huskies are the only contenders
left to challenge the Huskies for
the league championship.
The Huskies will be facing the
league's leading scorer at Du-
luth in Walt Ledingham. Coun-
tering -Ledingham and the rest
of the potent Bulldogs will be
the league's top netminder,
Morris Trewin.
Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield
Village, interview schedule available for"
work as guides, in food service, as cash-
iers or groundsman; SPS, 212 SAB.
General Notices

Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 2)
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
Interviews: Appointments made by
calling 764-7460 or coming into the of-
f ice.
January 21:
DB.E.S.T.S., Belgium, Jobs Abroad, will
interview 1:30, 3:00 and 4. Register in
person or by phone.
January 22:
Davey Tree Co., Kent, Ohio: 9:30-5.
Interested in students in forestry, bio-
logican sci., and horticulture.
Announcements:
Applications available for Park Rang-
er positions throughout state of Mich.,
SPS, 212 SAB; applications deadline is
Jan. 25 for exam Feb. 27."..

History Make-up xam: will be Sat.,
Jan. 23. 10-12 a.., rm. 429 Mason
Hall; consult your instructor, then sign
list in history ofc., 3601 Haven Hall.
LS&A scholarship applications for
coming Spring, Spring-Summer, Sum-
mer, Fall. and Winter terms available
at rm 1220 Angell Hall; completed ap-
plics. due no later than Feb. 15; ap-
plicants must have had at least one full
term of residence in this college at
the time of the award; must have an
established 3.0 grade point average or
higher; awards based primarily on
need.

- 1

a

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