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January 06, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 6, '! c 7T

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 6, ~7T

r

,I

VACATION INCONSISTANCIES

Split series plague

By J. MICHAEL KEVRA
The Michigan hockey team, still
struggling to get above the .500
mark, continued its inconsistent,
play over Christmas vacation as
it split each of its three series to
run its season record to 6-6.
Of the three series, only the first
was WCHA action. In the contests
held just before final exams, the
icers, facing the always t o u g h
Wisconsin Badgers, took the open-
er 5-4 in orvetime but dropped the
second game, 5-3.
In the Friday night encounter,
Michigan came back from 2-1 and
3-2 deficit to take a 4-3 lead ear-
ly in the third period but Wiscon-
sin tied the score to force a ten
minute overtime.j
The winning goal was a power
play effort and came just after the
seven minute mark. Wolverine
wing Bernie Gagnon knocked
down an errant Badger pass near
center ice and cut down the left
Unreserved tickets are avail-
able at t he Michigan Ticket
Dept. for the Michigan-Austra-
lian basketball game which
starts at 8 p.m. tonight. Stu-
dents are admitted for $1, oth-
ers for $1.50, with tickets sold
at Crisler Arena prior to the
game.

wing with only one Wisconsin de-
fenseman to beat.
Just past the blue line, he 1 e t
loose a hard slap shot w h i c h
seemed to stun Badger netminder
Jim Makay. The loose rebound
came out in front of the goal and
was picked up by Merle Falk who
rammed it home from 20 feet for
the winning tally.
Falk, Gagnon, Michel Jarry, and
Brian Slack accounted for the oth-
er Michigan goals.
THE SECOND game was a dif-
ferent story, however, as Wiscon-
sin scored twice in each of th e
first two periods to grab a 4-0
lead.
Michigan came back in the third
stanza on goals by Punch Cartier,
Backy Straub, and Slack but the
rally fell short. The split brought
the icers' WCHA record to 2-4.
For its next action, the hockey
team travelled to Detroit for the
Great Lakes Tournament, a two
day, four team affair.
In the first game the icers fac-
ed Brown, a representative of the
Ivy League. Michigan's small but
swift skating icers were more than
a match for the large but slower
Bruins and they cruised to an easy
4-1 decision.
Leading the way for Michigan
was Gagnon, one of the best play-
ers in the WCHA this season, as
he counted two goals and an as-

daily
sporl
NIGHT EDITOR
J. MICHAEL KEV
sist. His first goal was a
shot from near the right1
he beat Brown netmind
Reycroft, cleanly.
Only 34 seconds later
connected again as he
Jackson a perfect passz
blueline and then, after
has stopped Jackson's sl
the rebound past the fal
tender.
After the game, Michig
Al Renfrew summed up
tory. "They were a good t
noted, "but our goaltend
excellent."

Wolverin
THE NEXT NIGHT Michigan's
goaltending was still fairly good
but the defense was weak as the
icers fell to Michigan Tech, 7-2,.in
the championship game. The por-
ous defense allowed 42 shots on
goal as compared to only 23 for
the Huskies.
Tech scored early on a powerj
jRA play effort by Mike Usitalo after
RA only 69 seconds as they built up;
a 6-0 lead before Michigan could
long slap get untracked. Usitalo was easily
point and the star of the game as he count-
er, L o u ed three goals, the proverbial h a t
trick, and an assist to pace t h e°
Huskies.
Gagnon "We just didn't put the puck
fed Rick into the net", commented R e n-
near t h a frew after the game. John MacIn-
Reycroft nis. the Michigan Tech mentor was
hot, slid delighted with his team's perform-
len goal- ance. "We skated well," he said.
"It was our best game of the sea-
;an coach son both offensively and defensive-
the v i c- ly. This is the best team I've had
team," he in five years."
ling w a s MICHIGAN started out the new
I year with a bang routing the in-

icers

experienced Yale Bulldogs 11-1 in
the opening game of the Nichols
Tournament in Buffalo, New York.
Nine different Wolverines scored
including a number of the lesser
used players as Renfrew went to
his bench early and often.
Again ias usual?) Gagnon was
the star as he garnished one goal
and three assists to pace the at-
tack. Michigan scored five times
in the opening period, added two
more in the second, and four more
in the last period to clinch the
victory.
Both Julian Nixon and Bob Fal-
coner scored twice while Gagnon,
Rene Demarias, Rick Marlette,
Falk, Jarry, Straub and captain
Paul Gamsby added single scores.
In the championship game, it
looked as if the icers were about
to break their habit of splitting
series as they took early leads of
1-0 and 2-1 before pulling into a
4-4 tie. But the Dartmouth Ind-
ians went on the warpath in the
final ten minutes to pull out a
hard-earned 6-5 victory.

''

HOLIDAY ENTREE:

Grap pers feast on opponents

i

By TIM OBOJSKI
While most of us wallowed in
gastronomic mirth during our
winter respite, Michigan's grap-
plers (a band of little Scrooges,
as all good wrestlers are) fasted,
choosing to fatten themselves on
success rather than calories. Their
discipline proved its worth Dec.
29-30 in LaGrange, Ill., as the
Wolverines finished fourth in a
field of 52 at the Midwest Open.
The tournament, which is "equal
to the NCAA Tournament in terms
of toughness, in terms of the level
of competition" according to,
Coach Rick Bay, showcased some

of the nation's finest collegiate
wrestlers. Included in this prodi-
gious display of muscle were even
several former collegiate cham-
pions, now wrestling with the va-
rious wrestling clubs that entered
the tournament.
The only squads to finish ahead
of Michigan were what are com-
monly accepted as the top three
collegiate teams in the country:
Iowa State, the defending NCAA
champion, Oklahoma State, the
defending Big Eight Conference
champion, and Michigan State,
runners-up in last year's NCAA
tourney.
The Wolverines gained only four

place-points among the 42 they
totaled, indicating good balance.
"Theoretically, this should make
for a good dual meet team," said
Coach Bay. "But you need guys
who could go all the way to win a
big tournament."
Individually for Michigan, 150
lb. freshman Jerry Hubbard was
undoubtedly the most outstanding.
He won his first two matches be-
fore he was dropped by Iowa
State's Don Gable, considered by
Bay to be "the greatest collegiate
style wrestler in the nation."
Following the- defeat, Hubbard
went on to win his next three
matches and was the victim of a
controversial referee's decision in
the consolation finale as he lost
to NCAA defending champion
Larry Owings of Oregon State.
Captain Jerry Hoddy fought his
way to the semi-finals, capturing
four victories in all. Jim Hagen
won three matches. Tim Cech won
one. Mark King won his first
three, lost to defending NCAA
champion Darrell Keller from
Oklahoma State, and gained one
more victory before bowing out.
Mitch Mendrygal took the same A
route, his loss coming to defend-
ing Big Eight champion Carl
Adams. Tom Quinn lost his opener
to the eventual champion, won
four in a row after that, and be-
came the only other Wolverine
grappler to place, losing the con-
solation match to Keith Abens of *
Iowa State. Therlon Harris won
two. Walt Sexton won one. And
Rick Bolhouse won two.
Bay is understandably pleased
with his young team's progress
and says, "I think we could cause
a lot of trouble in the Big Ten and
make a respectable showing in AP
the NCAA Tournament."
SAV
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USED

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1.

ORSON WELLES FILM CLUB
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
PARAMOUNT PICTURES
PRESENTS
A WILDWOOD-
INTERNATIONAL
PRODUCTION
STARRING
ROBERT REDFORD
(the "SUNDANCE KID")
GENE HACKMAN
(Academy Award nominee
of "BONNIE & CLYDE")
CAMILLA SPARV
IN
TECHNICOLOR I APARAMOUNTPiCTURE
PRODUCED BY
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