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September 11, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Saturday, September 11, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan News Phone: 764-0552

SKULL
a play

Fri.-Sat -Sun. 8 P.M.
AIR CONDITIONED

news briefs
By The Associated Press
A MILITARY JUDGE yesterday denied a defense request for
a directed verdict of acquittal on all murder charges against My
Lai defendant Capt. Ernest Medina.
"There is some substantive evidence as to each and every charge
and specification," ruled Col. Kenneth Howard, the military judge,
in denying a defense motion.
Defense lawyer F. Lee Bailey requested the motion on grounds
the government had not proved its case and has denied Medina, 35,.
Montrose, Colo., due process of law.
In a related development, a U.S. District Court judge in Atlanta
ruled that the federal government may prosecute, for criminal con-
tempt a witness who refused to testify in Medina's trial.
Medina, 35, is charged with the murder of 102 Vietnamese
civilians during an infantry assault on My Lai three and a half years
ago.
U.S. SENATOR WINSTON PROUTY, (R-Vt.), a veteran of
20 years in Congress, died yesterday at the age of 65.
Prouty, who entered the House of Representatives in 1951 and
went on to the Senate in 1959, died of gastric cancer at New
England Deaconess Hospital in Boston. He had undergone surgery
16 days earlier for a stomach ulcer that physicians said was malig-
nant.
Prouty was known as a moderate Republican and sometimes
clashed with leaders of his party. While generally supporting the
administration's Vietnam policy, he also urged consideration of an
internationally supervised ceasefire in Vietnam.
PRESIDENT NGUYEN VAN THIEU will step down if he re-
ceives less than 50 per cent of the ballots actually cast in South
Vietnam's presidential election, informed sources reported yes-
terday.
It was not clear on what basis the percentage would be figured,
- on the total number of registered voters or on the number of
ballots cast. Nor was it clear how a citizen could vote against the
lone ticket.
With the recent withdrawal of Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky,
Thieu is the only remaining presidential candidate.
* * *
HOWARD HAWKINS, president of RCA Global Communica-
tions, says the telecommunications administration of mainland
China has agreed to a direct telegraph connection to the United
States.
Hawkins said the administration had agreed to telegraph serv-
ice between RCA facilities in San Francisco and Shanghai.
RCA had requested the connection July 16, following Presi-
dent Nixon's announcement he would visit Peking next year. The
request asked for reactivation of direct service, as well as for
temporary expansion of facilities to handle government and press
communications during Nixon's visit.
CONFLICT OVER TAIN

Govt.
police

to
as

unrest continues

PONTIAC, Mich. (N) - A federal judge ordered the chief
U.S. Marshal at Detroit yesterday to begin an immediate
investigation of local enforcement of court-ordered school
desegregation in Pontiac.
U.S. District Court Judge Damon Keith ordered the in-
vestigation in response to a joint request by the Pontiac
Board of Education and the NAACP, which initiated the de-
segregation suit.
Meanwhile, six Ku Klux Klansmen charged with con-
spiring to blow up school buses used in the desegregation

investigate

RC Auditorium

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41

-Associated Press
WEARING CLOAKS and football helmets, Attica State Prison
inmates prepare to negotiate their 15 demands with New York
State Prison officials following a rebellion that broke out
Thursday.
Atitca prison rioteris
confer on hostages
ATTICA, N.Y. UP) - Rioting convicts breached an unde-
clared overnight truce at fire-scarred Attica state prison
yesterday, and fought from their last remaining cellblock
bastion to seize an adjoining one. They were beaten back bys
tear gas.
They then resumed negotiations with State Corrections
Commissioner Russell G. Oswald over the release of some 30
hostages being held for a second day, raising their demands
to total amnesty, plus freedom and guaranteed transporta-
tion to political asylum in "a non-imperialistic country."

plan were arraigned yesterday
before U.S. Magistrate P a u I
Komives. The men, including
Robert Miles, former grand
dragon of the Michigan Klan,
were released on $10,000 sure-
;y bond each. No pleas werE
entered.
The Klansmen are charged with
conspiring to blow up 10 empty
buses in a school bus parking lot
Aug. 30. The Justice Department
has announced a grand jury willI
investigate the bombing.
The NAACP and the school
board, acting together, a s k e d
Keith for an injunction barring
potentially disorderly gatherings
on school grounds and for t h e
dispatch of U.S. marshals to Pon-
tiac, a city of 83,000.
NAACP attorney Elbert Hatch-
ett called for a large force of
marshals in Pontiac or perhaps a
federal takeover of the Pontiac
Police Department, claiming t h e-
local police have "failed miser-
ably to discharge their responsi-
bilities."
Pontiac Police Chief William
Hanger said the NAACP charges
were untrue. "We don't feel we
have responded softly or impro-
perly," the chief said.
The Pontiac Police Officers As-
sociation announced yesterday it
would give $300 to the National
Action Group to fight the court
busing order.
NAACP attorney Elbert Hatchett
said the police association's ac-
tion was "typical" and indicated
a "method of discrimination in
law enforcement 'against blacks."

Nixon plan
accepted
by Meany
WASHINGTON (/P) - President
Nixon got a qualified promise of
cooperation yesterday from AFL-
CIO President George Meany, a
vocal critic of Nixon's economic
planning, on steps to follow the
current wage-price freeze.
Nixon met for two hours with
Meany and seven other union rep-
resentatives, plus an array of top
administration officials, to hear
organized labor's views on a wage-
price stabilization program that
will take effect when the freeze
expires at midnight Nov. 13.
Emerging from the White
House,Meany told newsmen that
he had told Nixon, "in effect, we
would cooperate with any system
that is equitable and fair."
Before the meeting, Meany said
unions would insist that profits as
well as wages and prices be re-
strained during what the adminis-
tration calls the "Phase 2" period
to follow the freeze.
Nixon's meeting with the la-
bor chiefs was described by Ron-
ald L. Ziegler, White House Press
Secretary as "consultation at its
best."
Leonard Woodcock, president of
the United Auto Workers said it is
obvious that there will have to be
further sessions between govern-
ment and labor before post-freeze
plans are agreed upon.
Ziegler indicated future meet-
ings were planned,
Ziegler said an administration
blueprint for "Phase 2" will be an-
nounced well in advance of Nov.
13 "so the proper mechanism can
be put in place" and so the public
generally will "know what will
happen."
Both labor and government
sources reported that the union
leaders did most of the talking at
the meeting.
"We made our position clear,"
said Meany.
But he emphasized that the
President gave no clue as to his
own thinking on potential steps to
follow the freeze.
Woodcock was asked if he was
convinced the administration was
sincere in seeking the views of la-
bor leaders on economic policy.
"I think I am, yes," he replied.
He reported - and Ziegler
agreed - that all parties to the
discussion were convinced it would
be neither useful nor practical to
seek a no-strike pledge from la-
bor during Phase 2.
Nixon announced Thursday that
the current 90-day wage-price
freeze will not be extended but in-
stead will be replaced by an un-
specified "system of wage and
price stabilization."

U.S.-Japanese talks stalled

WASHINGTON (P) - Secretary'
of State William Rogers said yes-
terday that failure of Japan to co-
sponsor a move aimed at keep-
ing Nationalist China in the Unit-I
ed Nations would harm its chan-{
ces for success.
Japan has declined to say yes
or no so far to a U.S. plea for
cosponsorship of a resolution
aimed at keeping Nationalist
China in the United Nations while
also allowing a seat for the Peo-
ple's Republic of China.
At a joint news conference with
Rogers, following a two-nation an-
nual cabinet - level meeting, Ja-
pan's Foreign Minister Takeo Fu-I
kuda said Japan favors keeping#
Nationalist China in the United
Nations but, because of domestic
political opposition in Tokyo, hasa
yet to decide whether it will go so
far as to formally cosponsor the E

U. N. move with the United
States.
Rogers said lack of Japanese
cosponsorship "would have a de-
trimental effect on the prospects
for success" of the effort at the
U. N. because "it would appear
that Japan is not wholeheartedly
for the resolution."
He noted that Japan's policy on
China is given much weight by
other countries who are aware of
China's importance as a major
neighbor of Japan.
The U. S. strategy at the U. N.
General Assembly session starting
later this month is to gain approv-
al of a measure which would re-
quire a two-thirds vote for any
ouster of Nationalist China. The
China issue dominated questions
at the joint news conference but
most of the two-day meeting was
devoted to the deep economic is-

sues straining relations between
Japan and the United States.
Both Rogers and Fukudal
sounded a strong note of harmony
as far as general U.S. - Japanese
ties and desires for future rela-
tionships are concerned. They also
made clear that differences re-
main.
Japan's heavy surplus in itsj
trade with the United States was
a major factor leading to Nixon's
drastic Aug. 15 measures aimed at
curbing the U. S. deficit.
A joint communique reiterated
U. S. desires for an upvaluing of
the yen and Japan's request for
an early end to the special U.S.
10 per cent import surcharges.
Neither side yielded on these
questions. Future international ex-
change rates are slated for multi-
country negotiations under the In-
ternational Monetary Fund. The
10 per cent surcharge, U. S. of-
ficials said, will remain until the
U. S. balance of payments pic-
ture brightens.

Thirty to 32 hostages, most ofj
them guards, a few of them civil-
ian workshop foremen, were seized
Thursday at the peak of the up-
rising, when an estimated 1,200
convicts ran wild. State officials
said the number dwindled to about:
500 "hard core" rebels by yester-
day. The hostages reportedly were
in good condition.
The rioters were armed with
pipes, baseball bats, homemade
knives and stored tear gas guns.z
Except for the abortive attempt?
to capture another cellblock, the
prisoners seemed more inclined
yesterday to negotiate than to re-
sume the rampaging and arson
that marked the riot's early hours.
Attica has 2,254 inmates, 85 per
cent of them black or Puerto Ri-
can, and racial pressures were1
cited as a chief underlying factor
in the riot.t
"We work under slave condi-f
tions here," a black inmate told
a newsman.r
Another black man said white
unmates were favored for the,
better jobs in prison shops.
In presenting demands to Os-t
Wald, a black convict read a state-r
merit terming the riot the result of
"the most unmitigated oppressionI
wrought by the racist administra-
tion network of this prison."

Robert Miles

School Board attorney Robert
Manley said he did not agree that
the local police have been unwill-
ing to enforce the order, but said
federal action was needed to stop
disruptions or desegregation by
"unlawful hooliganism" and "ir-
rational raving mobs of fools."
Keith said that after he hears the
report of the U.S. Marshal on
Tuesday, he will consider sending
a large force of marshals in to
maintain order.
The judge said that since Tues-
day, he has received a number of
telephone calls from parents who
said they were trying to obey the
court desegregation order but "the
local police stand by and allow
people to prohibit us."
i FREEF

WORSHIP

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1.600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation col 668-6427.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School--9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-688 1
Dr Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:30 a.m.-Services.
Sunday at 9:15 a.m.--Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Supper-Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Vespers.
HURON-H-L-S-BAPTIST-CHURCH
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
15CnG cp Wov

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
1432 Washtenaw Ave.

CHURCH

,I

Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Preaching Sept. 12-Mr. Sanders.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
at 330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion--Feast and
foolishness! (Bring food, music by Love's
Alchemy.)
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus--
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C, Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m.-Sunday School,
10:00 a.m.---Service.
There is infant and toddler care in the nursery.

WE ARE GETTING TOGETHER
A FREE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY
THIS FALL!
a place where we as women can teach and learn about ourselves,
our bodies, our history and culture as well as discover what
talents and skills we. all possess.
All of us are qualified to teach something. If you are interested
n convening a class, return this coupon before October 1 to your
WOMAN'S ADVOCATE OFFICE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNION
ROOM 332
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
I Name - I
IAddress - __
Phone,
I Course Interest
.__ _ - - - - _

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