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December 12, 1971 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Sunday, December 12, 1971
A starry eyed Christmas
dreaming of the Neediest

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven'

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPage I~Ieven

By ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
This season of winter holidays
--two weeks away from life-has
many artificial contrivances.
At this time each year, the New
York Times prints a heart-rend-
ing roster of New York City's
Neediest Cases, operating on the
assumption tha this is the season
during which to remember pover-
ty and despair, illness and deso-
lation.
Amidst the tinsel, the glamour,
the plushness of a well-decorated
department store, lurks a spec-
tre, brought into the open by the
Times appeal, by the Salvation
Army bell ringers, by UNICEF and
charity balls.
These appeals for remember-
ing unfortunates at Christmastide

are lavish and festive in their own
right. UNICEF cards are haunt-
ingly beautiful and very much
"in"; going to a charity event is
much more defensible than go-
ing to a party without purpose.
And they Times appeal gives Amal-
gamated Plastics a chance to
prove its unflagging social re-
sponsiveness by sending in a
hefty check once a year.
But what of those unfortunates
not covered by traditional societal
Christmas concern?
Why not defend those who have
no elaborate defense systems to
protect themselves from our own
government-the victims of At-
tica, Indochina, HISC?
As we take time off to stroll for
two weeks through a wasteland,!

let us vow to be cognizant of the
world beyond.
It is all too easy to view this
holiday as a time to visit your
grandmother, to collect your al-
lowance from home, to hassle
about decidedly less than global
issues. All this comes to a head
on New Year's eve when in a des-
perate attempt to leave the world
millions of Americans go out and
get drunk.
So, as you walk to your grand-
mother's house, do take the short
cut through the empty field, look
to the sky, remember the birds,
and the flowers and the trees, the
summertime adornments that
have left for now. As you trudge
through the snow, be kind to the
universe.
But don't drift into the clouds.

FORSYTHE GALLERY
CHRISTMAS
GROUP -SHOW
PRINTS, PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS
SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS BY GALLERY ARTISTS
FORSYTH E
GALLERY
201 NICKELS ARCADE
ANN ARBOR, MICH. 48108
10 TO 5 TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
CLOSED BETWEEN CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S

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jKeep America Beautiful.
Advertising contributed
for the public good.

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Hi-performance and
Accessory Shop

201 E. HOOVER, ANN ARBOR-FREE PARKING

MOTHERS RISING
Some last goodies for you

Sour Cream
Bobka

THIS QUICK and easy cake re-
cipe comes from Gloria
Sprung in Lincroft, New Jersey,
Night Editor Geri's mother is a
staunch advocate of the woman's
movement.
"Women should be judged only
by their individual abilities and
capabilities," Ms. Sprung said.
"Working women,"' she added,
"have proved for many years that
they not only can perform the
duties of their job or profession,
but can run a household and raise
children concurrently, whereas
most men need worry only about
their chosen field. Prejudice about
the role of women may and will be

difficult to overcome, but the per-
formance of women in their cho-
sen field is their best offense," she
concluded.
1/2 lb. butter; 1 c. sugar; 2 eggs;
1/ pint sour cream; 2 c. sifted
cake flour; 1 tsp. baking pow-
der; 1 tsp. baking soda; 1 tsp.
vanilla; for topping; 2 c. sugar,
1 tsp. cinnamon; % c. chopped
nuts.
Cream butter and sugar; add
eggs and sour cream. Blend to-
gether dry ingredients, add to
creamed mixture. Add vanilla. I
Stir together topping.'
Pour half batter into buttered
pan, sprinkle with half the top-
ping. Repeat. Bake 35 minutes at
350 degrees.

Never Fail
German Molasses
Cookies
PAT MAHONEY'S mother sent
us this recipe from East Lan-
sing. "They never fail," editorial-
ist Mahoney assured us, and he
should know since he lives through
countless dozens of them each
year-this recipe makes seven doz-
en cookies!
1 c. margarine; 11/2 c. molasses;
3 c. brown sugar; 4 c. sifted
flour; 1 tsp. baking soda; 1 tsp.
salt; 2 tsp. ground ginger; 1
tsp. ground cinammon; 12 tsp.
ground cloves.
Melt margarine in a pan. Add
molasses and sugar. Heat until su-
gar is dissolved. Stir occasionally
and set aside to cool. Sift dry in-
gredients together. Blend. Add in
fourths to cooled mixture, mixing
well after each addition.
Wrap dough in wax paper and
refrigerate one or two days. Roll
1/ of dough at a time about 1/
inch thick on a lightly floured
curface. Cut with three inch round
or fancy cutters. Transfer to cook-
ie sheets. Bake for 6-7 minutes at
375 degrees. Cool on a wire rack.

V
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HAPPY HOC USE SHOP
RUSSELL STOVER CANDIES
A Variety of Gifts
HALLMARK, GIBSON,
NORCROSS
GREETING CARDS
CANDLES FOR ALL
OCCASIONS
662-9635
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER

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Let's hear it for the drunks.
It's not the drink that kills, it's the drunk, the problem drinker, the abusive
drinker, the drunk driver. This year he'll b e involved in the killing
of at least 25,000 people. He'll be involved in at least 800,000 highway
crashes. After all the drunk driver has done for us, what can we do for
him? If he's sick, let's help him. But first we've got to get him off the road.

PEOPLE KNITS FOR JUNIOR SWINGERS

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