100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 09, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SHOWCASE PRODUCTIONS NO.2!
VASCO
by George Schehade
TRUEBLOOD Theatre, Dec. 9, 10, 11
at 8 P.M.!
Box Office Open 2-5, M-W; 2-8, Th-S
Tickets: Thurs., $1X00; Fri., Sat., $1.50
3 PERFORMANCES ONLY!
ARM/Michigan Film Society presents
Orson Welles'
incomparable masterpiece
Citizen Kane
ORSON WELLES, JOSEPH COTTON,
AGNES MOOREHEAD, EVERETT SLOANE
photography by Gregg Toland
editing by Robert Wise, Mark Robson
Charles Foster Kane, a multi-millionaire foundling raised by a
bank, owned 37 newspapers, two news syndicates, radio network,
grocery stores, paper mills, factories, ocean liners. Ke married a
president's niece, lost a campaign for governor of New York,
married a salesgirl, built Xanado.
"He had some private form of greatness, but he kept it to
himself ."-Rosebud.
Dec 10 Friday-and-Saturday Dec. 11
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
8 and 10 p.m. $1 cont.

NEWS PH
BUSINESS P
Ann Arbor, Michigan

ONE: 764-0552
PHONE: 764-0554

'a 4 e

*Iictigan

Dat'lu

page three

Thursday, December 9, 1971

j

By rirefs
ne wsBy The Associated Press

i

I

I

Hose
$3, bill
foreign

approves

ion

for
bill

l -

',

FRIDAY and SATURDAY

CHILEAN PRESIDENT Salvador Allende announced yesterday
that his government is taking over the distribution of food in
Chile.
Allende announced the government take-over in response to a
severe food shortage that is plaguing his country at the present time.
The socialist president attributed the shortage to the increased
purchasing power of the working people, whom he claims have greatly
benefitted under his administration.
Allende's election last year marked the first time a Marxist had
ever been freely elected to the presidency of a South American!
nation.
REPUBLICAN LEADER Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania filed a
petition late yesterday to close out the debate on the Supreme
Court nomination of Assistant Atty. Gen. William Rehnquist.
The petition to invoke the Senate's anti-filibuster rule, requiring
a two-thirds majority of senators voting, will automatically come to'
a vote tomorrow.
Scott said that 27 senators, 11 more than the required .number, had
signed the petition to cut off the debate.
Objections to the Rehnquist nomination have come from labor,
and civil rights organizations who consider his statements on first'
amendment freedoms and his general judicial philosophy, dangerous
to their interests.
WEST BERLIN acceited terms for travel between the divided
halves of Berlin yesterday but then accused the East Germans
of reneging on the agreement.
Chancellor Willy Brandt said in Bonn that differences within the
East German Communist party leadership apparently prompted the
turnabout. Brandt said he still expects the accords to be initialed
"sooner. or later."
The two agreements, if signed, will set down detailed procedures
for access into and within Berlin as agreed generally in the four-
power accord signed on Sept. 3 by the United States, Britain, FranceI
and the Soviet Union.
* * *
THE UNITED NATIONS endorsed an international treaty yes-
terday that would ban biological weapons.
The General Assembly's main political committee voted by ac-
clamation to commend the treaty and urge that member nations sign
and ratify it as soon as possible.
The committee also approved a separate proposal recommending
that all countries observe a voluntary moratorium on the development,
production or storage of the most dangerous chemical weapns.
The vote was 96-0 in favor of the moratorium, with 11 countries
abstaining, including all nuclear powers except the Soviet Union and
China.
SEN. EDMUND MUSKIE (D-Maine) was endorsed for thej
Democratic presidential nomination yesterday, by Sen. John
Tunney, (D-Calif).
Tunney was joined in the endorsement by California Assembly
Speaker Bob Moretti. With his endorsement, Moretti became the sixth
of seven men interested in seeking the California governorship to back
the Muskie candidacy.
California's other Democratic senator, Alan Cranston, indicated
that he would stay neutral until after the June 6 presidential pri-
mary.,

-Associated Press
Brazil's leader visits
President Emilio Medici of Brazil (right) stands with his head
bowed yesterday after placing an honor wreath at the Tomb of
the Unknown Soldier. Medici is in Washington for talks with
President Nixon.
NEW OFFENSIVE:

Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont.), whose six-
month Indochina war deadline has
the House and Senate deadlocked
over renewing foreign aid, refused
i to' give up the deadline.
The $3 billion foreign aid money
bill was passed by the House after
worried leaders appealed to it not
to kill the bill and a bloc of for-
eign-aid supporters who had
threatened to vote against it be-*
cause of cuts announced they
would reluctantly accept it..
The proposed slash of $100 mil-
lion in U.S. contributions to Unit-
ed Nations programs was retained

Laird urges
new strength
for NATO
BRUSSELS, Belgium (IF') -,U.S.
Secretary of Defense Melvin R.
Laird called yesterday for a ma-
jor redeployment of allied navies
in Europe to counter what he de-
..tidn. n n. oi thiildiin in tIho

aid

Bombing intensifies
in Laos, Cambodia

WASHINGTON (M) - The House passed yesterday a $3-
billion foreign-aid money bill bearing $400 million for Israel
and none for India, Pakistan and Equador - with Senate
leaders still saying they will refuse to consider it. The, vote
on the measure was 214-179.
With present spending authority for foreign-aid and de-
fense expiring at midnight, House and Senate leaders con-
sulted on putting out a stopgap interim extension - possibly
into next year - but came to no early agreement.

at 7 and 9

.I

-

THEIREMEN
(Czechoslovakian 1968)
directed by MILOS FORMAN
A comedy about a firemen's ball held for the purpose
of awarding an honorary hatchet to an 86-year-old
fire chief. Its release caused the resignation of
40,000 Czech firemen.
Renata Adler-"A shaggy dog story, with the pes-
simism of the exquisite logic that leads nowhere."
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
75c

i.

SAIGON (3) - Hundreds of
U.S. and South Vietnamese war-
planes were out in force yester-
day over Laos and Cambodia in
a massive campaign to cut the
Communist command's supply
lines.
The increase in bombing is
being carried out in response to
reports that indicate a speed-
up of supply movement along
the Ho Chi Minh trail. Those re-
ports claims that in recent days,
the number of movements along
the trail has increased to 300 a
day, compared wit h 200 two
weeks ago.
Officials cite the coming of
the dry season, which will reach
its peak in January and Febru-
ary as the main reason for the
Communist buildup.
At the same time it was also
disclosed that the South Vietna-
mese air force was taking part
in the attacks, but only in a
limited capacity.
Meanwhile, in Cambodia.
fighting has broken out near a

large prison at Prey Sar, whic
is located only eight miles fro
the capitol of Phnom Pen]
Villagers were reported fleein
from the city and sources ind
cated that the Communist for
es might attempt a stril
against the capital.
The heavy fighting aroun
Phnom Penh, brought a pledg
of continued support for th
Cambodians from South Vietna
mese President Nguyen Va
Thieu, who spoke yesterday to;
group of withdrawing Austra
ian troops, at Vung Tau, a po
southeast of Saigon.
Thieu also met yesterday wit
U. S. Ambassador Ellswort
Bunker and Gen. Creighto
Abrams, commander of U.1
forces in Vietnam, to discuss th
possibility of sending South V
etnamese troops in to aid th
Cambodians. Up to now, th
Vietnamese have operated o
only the east side of the Mekon
River.

in the bill Wednesday despite ef- Atlantic and Mediterranean.
forts to cut the reduction to $50 Lar sumte athe-on
million. Laird submitted a three-point
Anti-U.N. sentiment has been proposal to the defense planning
strong in Congress ever since the committee of the North Atlantic
U.N. voted to seat The People's Treaty Organization, meeting in
Republic of China at the expense the Belgian capital, the thrust of
h of Nationalist Chinese. which was a call for the forma-
m "We Cannot just plunge out of tion of a permanent international
h. this business," Speaker Carl Al- fleet in the waters around Europe.
g bert appealed to the House. "All Presently those waters are the
i- of us hope to see a gradual de- responsibility of on-call forces in
e- crease of foreign aid but we must several European countries. Laird
ke support this bill." would like to see those forces re-
Republican Leader Gerald Ford placed by a permanent standing
ad told the House U.S. aid in the bill army, with men supplied by those
ge was vital to the security of the countries like West Germany who
he Middle East and to the safe with. do not currently contribute to the
a- drawal of U.S. forces from the naval effort.
an Indochina war. The development amounted to a
a The ban on $15.5 million slated rejection of Tuesday's call by
1- for Ecuador was voted Wednesday Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev
rt because of that country's seizure for early Western moves toward
of U.S. fishing boats. the long-projected security parley.
th Laird stated that the allies are
th The Michigan Daily, edited and man- interested in negotiating with the
on aged by students at the University of Communists, but he emphasized
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second the need for negotiations through
S. class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
~eigan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,stegha'nesnilprto
he Michigan 48104. Pubiished daily Tues- the allied program.
xl day through Sunday' morning Univer- ealracintthcof-
he .ty year. Subscription rates: $10 by In earlier action at the confer-
he carrier, $11 by mail. ence, the European nations pledg-
on Summer Session published Tuesday ed to take on greater responsi-
ngthrough Saturday morning. Subsertp- bility for financing their own de-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by m~ail. fnse
HOLIDAY
EMA /aSHOPPING HOURS
MON. - FRI.
DEC. 9 9 to 9
SATURDAY
9to5:30
HAT SUNDAY
12to5
FORLD
STANGER'S
1928 _:
)

I

fi.

SHOP TONIGHT AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.

THE ALLEY CI
330 Maynard
TONIGHT ONLY-THURSDAY,
TEN DAYS" T
SHOOK THE M
dir. SERGEI EI SENSTEIN,1
(WITH ADDED SOUNDTRACK

MissJ gathers

heathery knits by the
bunch to look her
sharpest at holiday
doings. They're great
mixers in smooth and
textured actylic/polyester
in salmon heather.
Tops, sizes S-M-L.
Pant and skirt, 5-13.
A. Elephant-embroidered
sweater, $13.
jPull-on skirt, $8.
B. Turtleneck sweater, $9.
Striped vest, $11.
Button-front pant, $16.

Eisenstein followed POTEMPKIN with another monumental epic of the masses. In
TEN DAYS . . . he evokes the almost mythical quality of the Russian Revolution.
The film depicts the superhuman historical forces set in motion,by the overthrow
of Czar Nicholas II in 1917.
"Possibly the most distinguished picture in the history of cinema."-The New Yorker
"Eisenstein's theories of montage are taken to their logical extremes. One of the most exciting of all
films from a visual standpoint."-Peter Cowie, Seventy Years of Cinema.
also SHORT: Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. in the COCAINE COMEDY ("Mystery of the Leaping Fish")
SHOWS AT 7 & 9:30 $1.00
COMING MON.-CHILDREN OF PARADISE; TUES.-THE COMMITTEE
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11
HILL AUDITORIUM
8:30 P.M.
Jesus Christ Supersta'r-
As Interpreted by
THE NEW YORK TOURING COMPANY
Preceding the Performance
THE BRANDYWINE-In Concert

HAVE YOU GIVEN
MUCH THOUGHT TO
WHAT YOU'LL
BE DOING
TOMORROW?
Finding a job
that gives you
satisfaction isn't
easy today. Not in
a world as con-
fusing and com-
plex as ours.
But the Paul-
ist finds a fre-
quent joy in his'
own way of life'
and values that are
lasting.
As a Paulist he
may counsel a run
away youth, listen to
the problems of a
senior citizen, or-
ganize a Home
Mass or conduct
a forum on nar-
cotics. Because Paulists have al
ways been pioneers in communi-
cations, he may communicate
through the printed word or
through mass media such as
radio, films or television.
Whatever tool he chooses, the
Paulist gets his "message"
through.
Can you think of any other
life that will provide more inner
satisfaction for you?
For more information about
the Paulist priesthood write to:
Rev. Donald C. Campbell,

446JAAo1

_

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan