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December 08, 1971 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-08

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 8, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday._...December.. . 1971

_ __
I

Panelists offer diverse views
on President's economic plans

By JOHN CLEMENTS
Economics Professors Saul Hy-
mans and Warren Smith and repre-'
sentatives of three campus social-
ist organizations were panel mem-
bers last night in a wide-ranging
debate on President Nixon's New
Economic Policy (NEP).
The debate was held in the
Union Ballroom and was sponsored
by the National Caucus of Labor

Committees. About 90 people at-
tended.
The panelists' views of the ef-
fectiveness and motivation of the
President's NEP were widely di-
vergent, but all the panelists
agreed that international and do-
mestic economic policies are badly
in need of basic reforms.
One basic point of contention
was the relation of rates of un-

House approves day-care
plan; veto threatened
(Continued from Page 1) said the bill presented the House
and voted with 179 Democrats in with "the paramount moral vote
favor of the bill. Voting against it of the session."
were 134 Republicans and 52 Demo- Albert recalled that in a message
crats. to Congress two years ago Nixon
Speaker Carl Albert (D-Okla.), called for "national commitment
stepping down as presiding officer to providing all American children
to make a strong plea for passage, an opportunity for helpful and
stimulating development during the
first five years of life."
OSS returns "Although President Nixon has
changed his mind more than any
other President in my memory,,,
day eare plan Albert added, "I don't think he
would change his mind on the need
for helping children."
(Continued from Page 1) Although most Republicans at-
the estblishment of a parent- tacked the program on the basis
controlled child day care center- of the administrative difficulties it
The revised proposal asks for an poses and its estimated cost of $2
immediate loan of $15,000 instead, billion in the first full year of
It also asks for a coordinator of operation starting July 1, some
child day care and a day care voiced fear that it would lead to
"advocate" within OSS. federal control of children.
The original proposal, prepared "With this legislation the govern-
by Laura Taub, a s s is t a n t for ment enters into every home, play-
program development recommend- room and nursery in America,"
ed the formation of a nonprofit said Rep. David Dennis (R-Ind.).
corporation of a number of small Bsdeexndgfrtw mre
day care centers for use by stu- Besides extending for two more
dents, faculty, staff, and com- years such programs as the Job
munity parents. It also suggested Corps, Neighborhood Youth Corps
that the initial staff, facilities, and special health and food pro-
and office space be funded by the grams for the poor, all with their
University. built-in constituencies, the bill cre-
The present Child Care Action ates an independent corporation
Center which does exist was forc- to run the controversial legal serv-
Cd to relocate four times within ices program now operated by the
one year,o complained Samoff. Office of Economic Opportunity.
"Since the University pays for
the moving, it would be cheaper
for them to give a permanent Naked Lunch
place," she added.
Citing a lack of facilities and natural food restaurant
funds, the Regents last year re- inexpensive, carefully
jected a child care proposal which prepared lunch
called for a joint University-city
funded children's center. The Re- Weekdays 11-2:30
gents' veto followed a year of ef- 331 THOMPSON
forts by women's groups to start
a center at the University._________________
& APPEARING NOW-Return Engagement
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employment and inflation to eco-
nomic health and the capitalist
system as a whole. In his opening
statement, Hymans, with the as-
sent of Smith, stated the opinion
that, ". . . a four per cent rate of
inflation is n'ot too high a price
to pay for a three and one-half per
cent unemployment rate."
His statement touched off a
series of analyses by the other
panelists of the causes of current
national and international eco-
nomic ills. Mitch Stengal, of the
Union for Radical Political Eco-
nomics, laid the blame for current
troubles on massive expenditures
for the Vietnam conflict, and the
flow of dollars to other nations.
He further contended that Ame-
rican economic policies are short-
sighted in nature, requiring con-
stant, and fruitless revision.
Smith, crediting the Vietnam
conflict with lowering unemploy-
ment, contrasted with Stengal's
analysis, was equally critical of
the President's program, referring
to Phase 2 as "a horror story."
He also expressed concern that
the rates of unemployment and
inflation would reaccelerate when
the Phase 2 controls are lifted.
In his analysis of the monetary
crisis, Bill Bachman, representing
the Washtenaw Organizing Com-
mittee-Up Against the Wall Street
Journal, stated that a crisis was
at hand, even without the impetus
of the Vietnam conflict.
A much stronger statement to
the same effect was made by Peter
Rush, of the National Caucus of
Labor Committees. He viewed the
current controls as a last ditch
attempt by the President to stave
off a second Great Depression,
which he maintained is imminent,
pointing to stagnating rates of pro-
duction and services.

PROBE CO
'U' bias plan
(Continued from Page 1)
offices, is swamped; with hun-
dreds of alleged discrimination
complaints.
PROBE, however, remains un-
convinced of his argument. Ac-
cording to Crouch, "The National
Organization of Women is getting
information of HEW footdragging
across the country."
She maintains no resources are
needed for action. "The executive
Pot bill passes,
State House
(Continued from Page 1)
violations or on charges involving
what the bill called more danger-
ous substances.
Drugs such as heroin or cocaine,
for example, would bring four .
years imprisonment and $2,000
fines for possession.
Conviction of "delivery or - pos-
session with intent to deliver"
would bring an even harsher, 20-
year term and possible $25,000
fine.
In many cases, second offenses
would bring double penalties.
Police, instrumental in opposing
the bill and delaying compromise
agreement, would be empowered,
to arrest "upon reasonable cause"
to suspectbaemisdemeanor viola-
tion had been or was being com-
mitted.
In a related move, the House
also passed and returned to the
Senate its revision of a bill pro-
posing a new, two-year drug abuse
and alcoholism problems commis-
sion.
The agency is proposed to ex-
amine existing laws and treatment
programs, with a report due on
Jan. 1, 1973.
The House provided for $163,000
to operate the agency.

)MPLAINT
Autonomy ru
Vstatus ha (.Continued from Page 1)
-Limit the percentage of out-
orders are clear and specific that of-state students to no more
once discrimination has been than 22.5 per cent-the 1970-71,
found, government funds may be total;
withheld." -Set out-of-state tuition at
Both Harvard and the Univer- a level approximately equal to 75
sity were among institutions per cent of the student's costs;
which have been subject to such _Require faculty members
w i t h d r a w a l. The University's paid by the state to teach an
funds were reinstated when the average of ten credit hours;
fU' proposed an affirmative ac- -Require faculty members
ion program last Marchv supported by state funds and
to proamlasnt March. sendother sources to devote to teach-
The complaint is the second ing an amount of time propor-
PROBE has filed. The first and tionate to their support by the
the subsequent HEW investiga- state;
tion resulted in the affirmative ac- -Expel students or fire fac-
tion program. The second charges ulty members convicted of in-
the University "with acting in bad " -
faith" regarding to the program.
The Labor Dept. announced on Exquisite
Dec. 2 regulation, changes for
federal contractors and subcon- PIERCED
tractors regarding employment of
women. Failure to correct defici-
encies in the status of women "at
all levels and in all segments" of -14 t Gold
the work force can lead to the n 4
withdrawal of funds. The regula-
tions call for each contractor to
rewrite its own affirmative action
plan by a stipulated date next ~
year.
The Women's Commissions is -
meeting with President Robben
Fleming this morning concerning
his appointment to the American
Council on Education's advisory
unit to HEW on sex discrimina-
tion. The appointment has met
with criticism by many national
women's groups.
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Such stipulations had been
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student disruptions, the econ-
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some professors. The Legisla-
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further provisions, had these
not been overturned.
In defining the Board of Edu-

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tution.

role as an advisory one,
again cited the consti-

Ann Arbor N.O.W.
Meeting
Gaye Crouch-spe- ker
Nat'l N.O.W. Board Member
Wed., Dec. 8, 8 P.M.
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