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December 05, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-05

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Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies
presents:
HUYNH KIM KHANH
Asst. Prof. of Political Science, Univ. of Western Ontario
NIXON AND CHINA!
Is There Anything in the Wind on Vietnam?
TUESDAY, Dec. 7,8- P.M.
East Lec. Rom.-3rd Floor Rackham

1'

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

(17 4

Sfrtitan

a- at'lu

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, December 5, 1971

I

n briefs
n e -w-s-By The Associated Press

IRABR .
YThEWFRE December 15-19
Men d el s s o h n
presentsheetssohn
Seats available for Saturday Matinee, Dec. 18
and Sunday evening, December 19
Tickets available at Stanger's (on State Street)
Box Office at Lydia Mendelssohn opens Dec. 13
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE

I

THE SKIRMISHING between President Nixon and the Demo-
cratic Congress over legislation for his new economic policy is
about over, with Nixon apparently the winner.
The big Democratic retreat was on a tax-cut Nixon said he would
veto unless it were stripped of extra tax reductions and a plan for
financing presidential campaigns with public funds.
Senate-House conferees knocked out some $12 billion of tax
cuts the Senate had added and also whittled down the campaign
financing plan to such an extent that the White House strongly im-
plied Nixon would sign the bill.
A BILL AIMED at raising price supports on feed grain and
wheat by 25 per cent this year and next year was approved by
the House Agriculture Committee Thursday over opposition by
the Nixon administration.
The bill would raise rates on surplus corn and wheat by 20 and
30 cents per bushel respectively.
* * *

A ROMAN CATHOLIC law professor who opposed passage of
New York's liberalized abortion law has been appointed legal
guardian for an unborn child in an effort to prevent its abor-

I

(I
I

Joe Hill, the movie:
"A BEAUTIFUL WORK,
PART HISTORY, PART
SOCIOLOGY AND IN
LARGEST PART, A FILM
BALLAD ABOUT A FOLK
HERO! DIRECTOR
BO WIDERBERG HAS
TAKEN A PART OF
HISTORY AND GIVEN IT
THE GLOW OF LEGEND"
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine
"BO WIDERBERG'S 'JOE
HILL' IS SPLENDID
BEYOND REALITYI"
--PaulD.Zimmerman.Newsweek

Joe Hill, the man:
Joe Hill was a banjo-playing
drifter who became an organ-
izer of the radical "Wobblies.
In 1915, he was indicted for
murder and executed.
Many felt he was framed.
It has fallen to Bo Widerberg,
director of "Elvira Madigan",
to tell this uniquely American
story. In "Joe Hill" he chooses
not to concentrate on the
political being or musician but
concentrates on Joe Hill the MAN.

tion.1
Robett M. Bryn asked New York State Supreme Court Justice
Lester Heltzman Friday to extend his guardianship to all human
fetuses scheduled to be aborted in the city's 18 municipal hospitals.
Last week Holtzman appointed Byrn legal guardian for an un-
born baby and thus barred the unidentified expectant mother from
having the abortion she was awaiting in Queens Hospital.
* * *
TALKS ON LONG-TERM WALL PASSES for West Berliners
deadlocked yesterday. East Germany claimed new Western de-
mands interfered with a special Christmas pass arrangement it
was ready to announce.
West Berliners have not been permitted to visit East Berlin since
May, 1966. Christmas passes are a burning issue for many of the
divided city's people.
The stalled talks also postponed signing of agreements in the
other part of the all-German dialogue, those on Berlin transit access
already completed.
CIVIL RIGHTS LEADERS and three black congressmen are}
holding a public forum in Jackson, Miss, today to air charges
that blacks were intimidated and cheated in Mississippi's gen-
eral election last month.
A spokesman for the National Association for the Advancement:
of Colored People, the organizer of the forum, said the forum would
consider lawsuits Co contest various races if evidence could be found.
No statewide races are to be contested, the spokesperson added.!
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE POLICE say they plan to prosecute who-
ever .stole a list of 212 police undercover agents and circulated
the names around the Michigan State University campus under
the slogan "Know Your Local Police."
Lawrence Hoffman, head of the state police intelligence section,
said he will prosecute the distributors under felony charges.

-Associated Press
Two-plane collision
Inspectors prowl around the wreckage of a two-plane collision which occured near the Raleigh-Durham,
N.C. airport yesterday. Two men were killed as their light aircraft crashed into an Eastern Airlines
DC9 plane. None of the 23 passengers aboard the DC9 were injured. The two planes collided about
two miles from the airport as the airliner was making its approach.
1954 TACTICS?
Nortleast Cam-bodian front hit

By The Associated Press
North Vietnamese troops are
creeping closer to Cambodian
fortified positions on the north-
east front in covered trenches,
similar to the tactics they used
17 years ago to defeat the
French at Dien Bien Phu.
The Cambodian high command
reported battles at two points
northeast of Phnom Penh where
the Cambodian front along a 30-
mile stretch of Highway 6 col-
lapsed last week.
French photographer J e a n
Duquesnay said that N o r t h
Vietnamese troops were digging
covered trenches closer and clos-
er to Cambodian positions just
north of a town 47 m i1e s
from the capital. This conceal-
ed their movements from d i v e
bombers, which hit close to the
government defenses with high
explosives and napalm.
Trenches of this kind w e r e

used by the Viet Minh prede-
cessors tohthe present N o r t h
Vietnamese and Viet Cong fight-
ers in the battle for Dien Bien
Phu in 1954.
Meanwhile in North Vietnam,
American jetshescorting B 5 2
bombers on the Hi Chi Minh
trail yesterday attacked t h r e e
radar sites within the country,
the U.S. High Command report-
ed.
The raids raised to 85 the num-
ber of reported strikes by U.S.
aircraft in the heightened tech-
nological warfare inside North
Vietnam this year.
Massive supply buildups are re-
ported in the pass areas as the
North Vietnamese begin their
dry season effort to move sup-
plies down the trail.

B52s struck Friday in Cambodia
and South Vietnam, the com-
mand reported. Two missions in
South Vietnam were flow n
against North Vietnamese infil-
tration routes and supply dumps
in the central highlands, where
an enemy buildup is reported
under way.
Meanwhile, while the U.S. has
been increasing its bombing of
North Vietnam, the North Viet-
namese have cut down on non-
political broadcasts from Amer-
ican prisoners of war to relatives
in the United States. No non-
political message from POWs
have been broadcast for 10
months.
With Christmas drawing near,
there has been no indication
that theeflow of prisoners yule-
tide greetings held over Radio
Hanoi for the past three years
will be repeated this year.

'X 110
Chevrolets
face recall
DETROIT W) - General Mot-
ors Corp. announced yesterday it
is advising the owners of m o r e
than 6.6 million Chevrolets to take
them to dealers for installation at
company expense of restraints to
offset engine mount failure.
The recall-believed to be t h e
largest in auto industry history
- affects owners of approximate-
ly 6,682,000 1965 through 1969
regular-size Chevrolets and Novas
as well as 1967 through 1969 Ca-
maros, and certain light trucks.
Industry soutrces say that when
the mounts foul the accelerator
can be jammed open, sending the
car speeding out of control.
The company said only vehicles
with V8 engines are involved, add-
ing that this excludes all Chev-
elles, Corvettes and six-cylinder
models.
About two weeks ago, consumer
advocate Ralph Nader accused the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration of "callous disre-
gard for the safety of the own-
ers and paggengers" in its hand-
ling of the reports of defective en-
gine mounts. At the same time,
he accused General Motors of
"corporate irresponsibility" in not
moving to correct the defect.
In a letter to the National
Highway Traffic Administration
GM said it "does not agree that
these engine mounts constitute a
safety-related defect.
However, GM said its Chevrolet
Division plans to notify owners by
certified mail as soon as owner's
names can be obtained by state
vehicle registration records. The
company added that restraints
would probably be available in late
February.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily sTues-
day through Sunday morning Unive-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 1'y
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.
ITWITH
YOUYOU
CAN'TTAKE
ARM presents
-TON IGHT-
Godard's
Vladimir
and Rosa

"more t h a n anything
since WEEKEND, it re-
calls the work of pre-Mao
Godard . . playing is
exuberant and energetic,
as childlike as the fan-
tosies."-N.Y. TIMES
NAT SCI AUD
7:30 & 9:30 $1.25

Paramount Pictures Presents
' ~A Sagittarnus Production
A BO WIDERBERG FILM
wir wrote songs and was shot.
sta mg
THOMMY BERGGREN
0.1oaled.BOWIDERBERG
;=. a M 4bg.luhOANHBAEZ icotor
A Paramonwt PiCtue
ALSO-2nd BIG HIT

In addition to
against the Hi Chi

the raids
Minh trail,

I.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
YOU CAN'T TAKE
IT WITH YOU
QUIRK AUDITORIUM
TUES. thru Sun., Dec. 7-12
8:00 p.m. $2.00

For HIM or For HER

oFIFTH ForuLm
OOWNTOWPW ANN ARMOR
~c. IFRMATION 761-3700

"Joe Hill" 5 & 9
"Stranger" 3 and 7

For reservations dial
QUIRK BOX OFFICE
487-1221 between
12:45 and 4:30 p.m.
ALL SEATS RESERVED
/I

The ideal gift-
our classic key
ring with personalized
tag. Available
in sterling silver,
gold-filled, and
14 Karat gold.
from $5.50
(engraved at no
extra charge)

III

GOOD SATURDAY MAT. SEATS!

r

The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
Presents IN THE NEW Power Center

arcade jewelry shop
16 Nickels Arcade
for fine jewelry-We Will Help You Find the Right Gift

1

ARM

Michigan Film Society
presents
Orson Welles
Film
Festival

TUESDAY
Dec. 7
Franz Kafka's
THE TRIAL

t
t
1
I
1
t
t
t
/
t
t
1
I
I
t
irec-
I
Vel- f
,th-
elli,
t

1962
Welles' screenplay,
tion, production; with
les, Jeanne Moreau,
ony Perkins, Elsa Mar
Qnr . r-a i:s..

dir
Ar
tin

WEDNESDAY
Dec.. 8
Isak Dinesen's
IMMORTAL
STORY
1968
Welles, Jeanne Moreau,,
music by Erik Satie

F R IDAY. - SAT.
Dec. 10-11
1941 classic
CITIZEN
KANE
Welles, Joseph Cotton,
Agnes Moorehead,
Everett Sloane,

t '' V'YffiM V UVw vI I

I

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