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December 04, 1971 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Doge Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, December 4, 1971

Page Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, December 4, 1971

BUDGET SQUEEZE

Courses
By JOHN MITCHELL
Counselors in the economics de-
partment begin signing b 1 a n k
course selection forms for juniors
and seniors in that department
over a week before advance clas-
sification began Oct. 25.
"How else can they assure, es-
pecially in the light of the budget
cut, that we will get the courses
we want," said one economics ma-
jor.
The action of this department re-
flects the apprehension of a grow-
ing number of University students

close

due

to

lack

of

_
I
1

resources

and faculty that advance classifi-( to reserve course selections one I sity budget would increase the al- area of advanced classification,"j

rj

.,. ... ..,..., ..,, ...... _ .,..,..... _ .. _ _....... - _.. , _ ... _ ... - __ - ., .,,, .,..._.o .... .....,.... _ _ ... _ .. _ ...,

cation is a first come, first served
proposition. This conclusion was
supported again this fall as 148
courses closed before the winter
term advance classification ses-
sion ended Wednesday.
"Although we have set keeping
courses open at a high priority
level this year," LSA Dean Frank
Rhodes said, "there are just not
enough resources available to keep
all courses open."
When begun, the advance classi-
fication period enabled a student

term before the courses were to
be taught. A student could be re-
asonably assured of a place in the
courses he selected.
For the past several semesters,
however, the number bf courses
closing before all students have
registered has mushroomed, with
200 course closings before the be-
ginning of last winter's term, 116
during the preclassification period
for the fall term of 1971 and 148
for this winter's term.
The fear that a reduced Univer-

ready large number of early course
closings witnessed during the pre-
classification sessions brought over
half of the 22,000 students to pre-
classify in the first week of the six
week program, according to John
Stewart, director of registration.
But Rhodes feels that the fear
of fiscal squeeze causing a further
rash of course closings is, for at
this year at least, premature.
"The low budget has created
some very serious problems in the

Departments threatened by budget cutbacks

(Continued from page 1)
complaints one year ago that LSA
was not receiving allocations com-
mensurate with its growth, seems
to have changed his mind.
"Among the University's col-
leges," he now says, "I think the
literary college is the hardest
pressed. I don't think its funding
ever caught up with its growth
between 1964 and 1969."
Smith also cites a decline in re-
search funds at the literary college
-which he attributes to the gen-
erally sluggish economy. This has
resulted in the assumption by
some departments of faculty sal-
aries that had previously been paid
by research grants.
Faculty members and deans are
hesitant to speculate which units
were hit -the hardest by the fi-
nancial belt-tightening,band many
were not even aware that some,
units were excused from making
their total cutback.
LSA Dean Frank Rhodes, ap-
pointed only last summer, says
simply that "in LSA now, budgets
are so tight that there is no room
for imagination."
Associate LSA Dean Alfred Suss-
man, who served as acting dean
prior to Rhodes' appointment, says

he thinks several LSA departments
are particularly hard-pressed fi-
nancially. These include mathe-
matics, psychology, chemistry,
economics and anthropology de-
partments.
Since these fields are so di-
verse, theories that one or more
categories of departments have
been especially 'hard hit by the
austere budget tend to be dis-
pelled.
The natural sciences, however,
have faced some unique problems.
Chemistry, for example, is ex-
periencing serious problems in ac-
commodating increased enroll-
ments in its introductory courses,
notes Prof. Robert Taylor, asso-
ciate chemistry department chair-
man. Because of the strict limi-
tations on seating students in lab-
oratoryareas, he says, enrollment
must increase an entire section at
a time - as opposed to standard
lecture courses which have flexible
section sizes.
Botany and zoology have ex-
perienced similar problems with
botany-zoology 106 providing the
most evident example of a lack of
space and facilities. Its enroll-
ment has skyrocketed from 40 stu-

dents to over 500 in eight years
causing shortages of laboratory fa-
cilities each year.
And because equipment funds
across the University have been
"frozen" in anticipation of pos-
sible state budget cutbacks this
year, efforts to make physical im-
provements will be severely ham-
pered.
"Since budget funds are inade-
quate in equipment and building
improvement areas, and natural
sciences have most of the labora-
tories," Smith says, "it would be
very natural if they were hurting

ment chairman, says the "direct
effect" was much less noticeable.
In this department - the largest
in the literary college - the size
of the faculty has not been re-
duced, though some cuts were ab-
sorbed by filling vacated positions
with lower-paid, less experienced
instructors.
The major administrative bud-
get problem in the next five years
will be how to survive times of fi-
nancial austerity relatively un-
scathed. To this end, the Uni-
versity is working to set a system
of priorities in order to most ef-
fectively appropriate its funds.
But it is uncertain what roles
the faculty and students will have
in advising the administration on
the formulation of these priorities.
TOMORROW: The growing
trend toward faculty-input in
budgetary decision-making.

Rhodes said, "but we still have
enough money available to main-
tain our present status, at least'
for this semester."
"The departments have not been
forced to close any courses or sec-
tions except in the case of facul-
ty resignations," he continues, but
then again we have not been able
to add any new courses.
"The immediate problem,"
Rhodes adds, "is that the budget
leaves no room for imagination."
Rhodes notes that although the
money was available to expand
some sections in overloaded curses
this year, if the budget squeeze
continues, this may be the last year
before the limit is reached on "belt
tightening."
"If the sparce budget continues,"
Rhodes said, "the University will
follow the path of slow deteriora-
tion."
"Courses will have to be cut,
equipment will soon be dated, and,
the overall academic atmosphere
will decline."
"This, over a line period of time,
will result not in the complete
closing of the University," Rhodes
concluded, "but an erosion into
mediocrity."
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Please Follow Smokey's A&
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BE sure to
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CAREFUL to
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SM OKEY

MUKI TSUR
Co-Editor of THE SEVENTH DAY o work analyz-
ing the feelings of soldiers who fought in the Six-
Day War of 1967)
Educator and Youth worker and Secretary of Kibbutz
Ein Gev
SPEAKS AT H I LLEL
DECEMBER 8-8 p.m.
Does the Kibbutz Movement
Face a Crisis?
Politics of the second-generation kibbutzniks. Effects of the Six-
day War. Generation gap between Kibbutz founders and their
Children. Kibbutz society and Israeli society.
There will be time to ask questions about general kibbutz life
for those interested in spending time on a Kibbutz.

the most.
"But on the other hand," he
says, "they might be able to save
money by increasing faculty class-
room time. The natural sciences
may be among the lowest in terms
of faculty productivity."
An especially difficult problem
has emerged this year in the en-
gineering college, where some staff
positions were left unfilled in or-
der to conserve the funds in its
equipment budget. But because of
the University-wide freeze on
equipment expenditures, the col-
lege sustained a drastic reduction
in equipment spending as well as
faculty size.
Thus, oceanography and chem-
ical engineering - two of the col-
lege's financially shaky depart-
ments - have grown progressive-
ly worse.
In the English department, how-
ever, Prof. Russel Fraser, depart-

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

~s4

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4
Day Calendar
Basketball: Michigan vs. Western
Michigan, Crisler Arena, freshman,
11:45 am., varsity, 2 pm. ,
Music School: String Dept. Chamber
Music Recital, Sch, of Mus. Recital
Hall, 4:30 pm.
UM Ski Racers: Ski Equipment Ex-
change, Barbour Gym, Noon-4:30 pm.
Hockey: Michigan vs. Notre Dame,
Coliseum, 8 pm.
Maor Theater: Mundi's, "It Turns,"
1429 Hill St., 8 pm.
Music School: Collegium Musicum,
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 306 N.
Division, 8 pm.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB
ANNOUNCEMENT
Graduate couples needed to inter-
view teenagers throughout the nation
during May and June; information
available thru this office or ISR,
Room 4062.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Phillips Exeter Academy, New Hamp-
shire announce Summer School Teach-
ing Intern Program for '72; applica-
tions and details available.
INTERVIEW
Miss Liberty, London, England, will
interview students Tues., Dec. 7, 10
a.m. - 12 p.m.; must have typing skill;
register by phone or in person; further
details available.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B.
JOBS IN A.A. AREA: for more info
call 764-7460

SalesvRepresentative, Will merchan-
dise savings insurance prog. In A.A.;
college degreed women preferred.
Associate editor or Assistant editor,
for technical publication in Detroit;
ability and education more important
than exp.
secretary to V.P., in Detroit Market
Opinion Res. Co.; typing & shorthand.
ATTENTION: C a r e e r Opportunity
Conferences to be held during Xmas
vacation, sponsored by local Cham-
bers of Commerce in many cities. Come
and discuss career opportunities with
area businesses and industries. So far
cities in the following states have
sent details: Conn., Hawaii, Ind., Neb.,
N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Va., Wn, Wis. Come to
our office to check your home town.
General Notices
Grad Outing Club: Come Liking, re-
lease exam. tension! Sun., Dec. 5, 1:30
PM. Meet at Huron St. entrance to
Rackham.
BILLIARDS
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BOWLING
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