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December 03, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-12-03

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EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
YOU CAN'T TAKE
IT WITH YOU
QUIRK AUDITORIUM
TUES. thru Sun., Dec. 7-12
8:00 P.M. $2.00
For reservations dial
QUIRK BOX OFFICE~
487-1221 between
12:45 and 4:30 p.m.
ALL SEATS RESERVED

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:' 764-0554

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan Friday, December 3, 1971
TAX BILL CONCESSION

Campaign

financing

pla

_ -7
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
PRESENTS'
H~ J
'Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
DECEMBER 8-11
Wednesday, Dec. 8, 8:00 P.M.-$2.50 %
Thursday, Dec. 9, 8:00 P.M.-$2.50
Thursday, Dec. 9, 8:00 P.M.-$2.50
Friday, Dec. 10, 7:00 P.M.-$2.50
Friday, Dec. 10, 9:30 P.M.-$2.50
Saturday, Dec. 1 1, 2:00 P.M.-$2.00
Saturday, Dec. 11, 8:00 PM.-SOLD OUT
TICKET SALES: Bursley Lobby Dec. 2, 3-4-7 P.M.; Mendels-
sohn Box Office Dec. 5, 6, 7-10 A.M.-6 P.M.; Dec. 8-11-
11 A.M.-8 P.M.
BOX OFFICE PHONE 668-6300

news brie fs
By The Associated Press 1
ANTI-MARXIST YOUTHS defied a newly declared state of
emergency yesterday by pouring into Santiago's downtown
streets in a new outburst against the leftist government of Presi-
dent Salvador Allende.
The Marxist leader met with his National Security Council
after ordering the state of emergency in Santiago Province as a mea-
sure to head off disorders springing from a women's march Wednes-
day night to protest food shortages and the visit of Fidel Castro.
INTERIOR SECRETARY ROGER MORTON said yesterday
that -Interior Department approval of the controversial Trans-
Alaska oil pipeline should be given by the end of January.
The Interior Department permit to allow construction of the
800-mile oil pipeline would represent government approval of the
project.
Several conservation groups, however, have obtained an in-
Junction in U.S. District Court in Washington- against issuance of
a permit on grounds that Morton had not complied with the Na-
tional Environmental Policy Act.
CAMBODIA'S northeastern front was threatened with col-
lapse by North Vietnamese troops yesterday after the fall of
two key towns, including Baray, forward headquarters for a 20,000
man operation there.
Military sources called the loss of Baray, 60 miles north of
Phnom Penh, the worst Cambodian defeat in 20 months of war.

Spostponed
WASHINGTON (m - President Nixon won a major con-
cession from House-Senate conferees yesterday as they post-
poned a bitterly contested presidential campaign financing
plan beyond next year's election.
The White House hinted strongly that Nixon might now
sign the tax reduction bill, which authorizes income taxpayers
to set aside $1 of their taxes for presidential campaigns.
Presidential press secretary Ronald Ziegler said, however,
"The President will use whatever legislative procedures he
feels are effective to make
sure the check-off system is
not implemented."
Ziegler said Nixon would veto
any bill which left him with a
direct choice of whether or not European
he check-off goes to effect. But
he hinted that Nixon might now t a e l L
sign the current tax bill which ta e m r e
merely authorizes the check-off
while keeping the option of veto- LONDON (') - A rush to sell
ing bills to appropriate the funds dollars swept Europe yesterday
for some future election. following reports of an impending

t

Chairman Wilbur Mills (D-
Ark.), of the House Ways and
Means Committee told newsmen

dollar devaluation.
The dollar slumped sharply at
the opening of exchange markets

' :

Senate conifirmns Buitz

he ^introduced the postponement
compromise because he was un-
certain the original tax bill would
have passed and certain that if
it did, Nixon would veto it.
The plan by which a taxpayer
could check off $1 of his income
tax to go to the party of his choice,
or a nonpartisan campaign fund,
was originally devised by Demo-
cratic party leaders.

The senate confirmed the appointment of Earl Butz yesterday
to the office of secretary of agriculture in a 51 to 44 vote seen
by both parties as the opening shot in next year's farm-belt
political campaigns.

THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION said yesterday it will try
to cut America's United Nations contribution to 25 per cent,
stressing this is not retaliation for Nationalist China's expulsion. E I 'I
The decision drew support of U.N. backers in Congress, including
subcommittee chairman Donald Fraser, but U.N. opponents said

ROSE BOWL ALLOCATION
SGC treats itself to a trip

Congress should cut the contribution deeper than 25 per cent.
k k.
NEWARK'S BLACK MAYOR has given his support to a con-
troversial school board decision to put the black liberatioil flag
in most of the city's public school classrooms.I
The rule provides that the red, black and green flags be the
same size as the American flags now in the classrooms. They will
be put in all classrooms of school with predominantly black enroll-
ments.
Mayor Kenneth Gibson called the measure "an attempt to pro-
ject a positive identity for black children."
PRESIDENT NIXON promised yesterday to give "close per-
sonal consideration" to the recommendations of a White House
Conference on Aging. He also promised to seek legislation to ease
the burden of property taxes, to improve pension plans and to
promote job programs for older citizens.

By KAREN TINKLENBERG
Members of Student Govern-
ment Council at the University's
Flint campus have voted to al-
locate student fundsto send
themselves to the Rose Bowl.
The 19-1 council decision to
use $4,000 for the jaunt was met
with a storm of protest by stu-
dents. But when council again
voted on the issue at their meet-
ing Wednesday it passed once
more, 13-7.
The allocation was made,
Treasurer Larry Blount said,
onlyas a means of "shocking
students out of their apathy"
toward student government.
Blount said the motion was
passed the second time because

many "emotional" students were
tryng to "force" council mem-
bers to change their vote by
putting pressure on them.
Because seven of the 20 voted
against going to the Rose Bowl,
the funds needed at this time
amount to approximately$2,800,
Blount said. But he believes
council members will drop all
plans and defeat the motion at
the next meeting.
However, Rick Curtis, a Flint
student, said he believed coun-
cil members originally intended
to go to the game New Year's
Day. But because of public pres-
sure and possible legal action,
he does not think government

members will go through with
their plans now.
Curtis said students are plan-
ning to bring a case against
their government's action to the
student judiciary Saturday. Paul
Des Jardin, president of the stu-
'dent judiciary, has said he may
issue an injunction stopping the
plans until a ruling is made.
If council members do go
through with their plans, they
will be going on the official
University Rose Bowl tour,
which costs $221 per person.
Blount said that he and other
council members were already
planning to go on the tour us-
ing their own private funds.

,
;
( °'

NA

but thenV government banks
stepped in to buy large amounts
to head off a drastic plunge.
The dollar closed above the day's
low point in London, Paris and
Zurich but at a record low in
Frankfurt, despite support buying
by the West German Bundesbank.
The decline had been triggered
by reports from a Rome monetary
meeting of finance ministers that
Treasury Secretary John Connally
is ready to negotiate a dollar de-
valuation in relation to gold as
part of a general realignment of
world money values.
A boom was set off in European
stock markets by the prospect of
an early end of the crisis in inter-
national trading since President
Nixon set up import restrictions
and cut the dollar's ties with gold
on Aug. 15.
The hectic foreign exchange
conditions had little effect on dol-
lar-carrying tourists in Europe.
Most banks and exchange agencies
haye widened their buying and
selling range to encompass such
fluctuations.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 4804. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mal
ARM presents
-TONIGHT-
Godard's
Vladimir
and Rosa
"more t h a n anything
since WEEKEND, it re-
calls the work of pre-Mao
Godard . . . playing is
exuberant and energetic,
as childlike as the fan-
tasies."-N.Y. TIMES
NAT SCI AUD
7:30 & 9:30 $1.25
j Join The Doily Staff
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
MINISTRY
OF FEAR
Dir. FRITZ LANG, 1943
with RAY MILLAND,
MARJORIE REYNOLDS,
and DAN DURYEA
LANGIAN FEAR strikes
an ex-con who becomes
marked for death in a

Miss J gives
three cheers for chino
in an arniy-style
jacket and pant
complete with flapped
pockets. . .an at-ease
outfit in olive, navy or
khaki Fortrel/cotton.
Sizes 5 to 13.

Jacket, $11.

Pant. $10.

M4JA4f

ii! i3i'i

mw

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