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November 30, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-30

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Tuesday, N6vembor 30, 1571

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, November 30, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page 5everi

CAN THE SUPREME COURT
CONTROL ILLEGAL POLICE
CONDUCT?
(illegal searches, confessions, etc.)
Professor Michael Bann
Department of Political Science, Purdue University
Dec. 1-Wednesday-3:15 P.M.
Law Club Lounge
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

LIVE A
LIT TLE
Meet the Midget, the lowest-
priced true sports car. The
action's in our showroom
now. Am
Overseas
Imported Cars, Inc.
936 N. Main
Ann Arbor

M' runs for the roses

RETIREMENT NEAR
Research VP reminisces

Continued from Page 4)

Taylor, who that day, along with

But Michigan took the ball on its | guard Reggie McKenzie and, line-
o"" gandmarched hfon thefidteosthe FoTball Nws' AllAmedcaContinued from Page 4) from the University of London. He edures. These sometimes come in
in 11 plays in its first "must". squad. time over the past few years. The first came to the States at 25, conflict."
drive of the season. things I do are determined by on a grant from the Rockefeller The man who saw University re-
Coin's teammates watched coolly intercepted a pass, halting a would-:my job and by my secretary. Each Foundation. He went back home. search nearly double during h i s
be Buckeye comeback effort, and day she gives me a little c a r d , but returned for good in 1937 as term as vice president says he's
and confidently as he booted thebeBcyeomakefrtan telling me who I'm seeing and! a professor at Iowa State Univer- niderd«an aooitfrcas
winning field goal - but Dana OSU coach Woody Hayes blew his what I'm doing. My life has been sity. sconsidered"rc apoloaddsIfor dass
wasn't so calm. top on the sideline. Contending!
set by others - now I'm going During and after the war he really think I am."
"I was shaking like a leaf out Darden interfered with receiver to have to do that for myself." served in the Army Chemical Ths issue, he says, is so com-
there," he said, adding, "The ball Dick Wakefield, Hayes stormed the The one-time director of the Corps, winding up as a division plicated that "people who say
ent straight down the middle. iel terbeig draged University's Botanical Gardens chief at the Fort Detrick, Md. they're, against it really don't know
The following week, the Wolver- by players and assistants, tore seems a bit wistful for his early biological laboratories - home of what they're against."
ines gave the home fans a chance apart the sideline down marker days as a researcher and teacher. biological warfare developments. "Classified research is the type
to witness a similar tension filled and kicked the third-down card The demands of his job have left When he came to the Univrsity of battle nobody wins," he ton-
game. onto the field. him with little time to keep 20 years ago it was primarily as tinues. "If it is banned, the na-
A national record of 104,016 At month's end the Wolverines abreast of developments in hisayresearcher, not a teacher.Norm-timnthe University, and people's
gathered in Michigan Stadium to were looking forward to meeting field of plant biochemistry and, an supervised a plaint nutrition nr th e st nd peoe's
see the Wolverines attempt to Stanford on New Year's Day, while as he puts it, "one just sort of an uer pln M trin careers won't be strengthened."
project under the Michigan Me-1 And if the ban on research, or
avenge last year's 20-9 defeat by some critics were faulting them for rusts away." nrial Phoenix Project. "embargo" as he calls it is ap-
the Buckeyes, but for a while it the close calls in the hst two Born in England, Norman re- With classified research likely proved, "some will choose to leave,
looked as though Michigan would games. ceived a BS and PhD from the to remain the subject of stormy some will have to leave. But whe-
have to wait another year. But, as Schembechler said, "11-0' University of Birmingham and debate, Norman's successor =- as ther the University is a better
The Wolverines moved the ball, ain't bad." later a Doctor of Science degree yet unnamed - will undoubtedly place is questionable."
but couldn't score a touchdown. face a rocky few months when he "Some might say it is morally
nthoe OSUhe attack, a Tom N o 1assumes office. But the out-going better," he says, "but I wonder
Crpn punt returnkgave O N o p olitical trend seen vice president will be sure to give about that kind of rgument."
State a 7-3 lead in the third quar- him some advice. The research to
ter'. A 11dy"I'll say don't believe anything have overwhelmed the last months
To make matters worse, Slade 1o llo J SG C election you're told Vice President Norman of Norman's job. And he takes
had to leave the game with a hip said." In high University admin- time to relate an anecdote about
pointer and was replaced by Larry istrative jobs, he says, most agree- it - drawn appropriately from the
Cipa. Once again, however, the (Continued from Page 4) ing that SGC has never done any- ments are made verbally, not writ- history of his native land.
Wolverines moved the ball when SGC now has four graduate stu- thing for them, but when SGC tries ten down, and .thus can be easily "England once controlled part
they had to-which was with seven dents, more than any recent to innovate and create new pro- misconstrued. of France, but gradually lost more
a h l t Council. grams for students, it is blocked "I'll also warn him of his diffi- and more until only Callis remain-
minutes to goanthbalotei!
own 28.d SGC has been attacked by grad- by that same lack of student in- cult task in serving dual inter- ed in its possession. When it lost
The drv uate student organizations over the volvement and support." ests. He should very much be a that too, Mary, Queen of Scots,
on two third down plays.uinclud- past few years for its. failure to When the three Student Caucus spokesman for the faculty, and commented that when she died
ing a 28-yard pass recptionsrepresent graduate students. This conservative members of SGC re- yet, as an executive officer, he and her heart was cut out, they'd
Rg a 28-yard pass reception by o criticism has been at the heart of signed last month they cited SGC's must relate to University goals and find 'Calais' written on it."
Rather, and a clutch fourth down the controversy surrounding the inability to function as a viable programs and do things in a way "I guess 'classified research' will
y Fivertheelith. for a first down formation of Graduate Federation. body. consistent with University pro- be written on mine."
The TD came on the next pla Tioft

.1

WHAT THE HELL
ARE REPUBLICANS
DOING FOR YOUTH?

i
a
i
I
i
t
i
i
's

Teach-in on
THE ISSUES
Abortion Reform
Ecology
Prison Reform
Age of Majority

today's problems
THE STARS
Rep. Mike Dively
Rep. Ray Smit
Sen. Gil Bursley
Rep. Dennis Cawthorne

with two minutes left, and was Iincumbents have also outlined a and had the voting patterns re-
aided by perfect timing on the long range goal for improving stu- mained static, the Student Caucus
pitchout by Cipa and a stupendous dent government, including even- candidates could have aligned
block by Seyferth. "I couldn't have tual reorganization of SGC into a themselves with Taylor and the
made it without that block," said radical student union. They admit Responsible Alternative candidates
! their plans are unclear at this to form a majority on Council.
point, but hope to involve many Instead, the three RAP Council
students in the newly formed Tem- members may find themselves
For the student body porary Employes Association. in much the same position that the
"hd b"Council has traditionally faced plains. "Students are reluctant to
a serious problem," former Coun- Student C a u c u s representatives
F1 F cil member Jeff Lewin, '73, ex- were in-voting "no" on proposals
involve themselves in SGC, claim by the liberal-radical majority.

November news briefs

i
,j
;t

(Continued from Page 4)

DATE: Tuesday, Nov. 30
TIME: 7:00 P.M.
PLACE: UGLI Multi-Purpose Room

by
Levi
Farah
SWright
Lee
&' Male
State Street at Liberty

OPEN.,
EVERY NIGHT UNTIL
8:30
Through December 23rd
Saturdays 'til 5:30 p.m.

. . . . . . . . . . . . .1

not have to walk alone at night and a "block house" system-
designated homes in every neighborhood where women could seek
aid in emergencies.
" The campus Student Credit Union-the only Credit Union
run by and for students in the nation-petitioned this month for
receivership because of financial problems.
The Michigan Credit Union League was appointed receiver of
the Credit Union, which opened in fall, 1969, taking charge of
reimbursing student depositors and continuing loan payment
schedules.
A spokesman for the Credit Union League attributed the
folding to a decline in student participation. Many students were
disenchanted by the credit union's reduced services-the office
was moved from its location in the Michigan Union, its hours
were curtailed, there were often long waits in line, and just one
dividend had been declared since SCU's inception.
* A mandatory student fee payable each term and closer
alliance with the medical center were two of the recommendations
included in the Report for Long-Range Planning of the Health
Service.
The committee, comprising the directors of the University
hospital, the medical center, the Dean of the medical school and
the Health Service as well as Robert Knauss, vice-president for
student services and David Heebink, assistant vice-president for
state relations and planning, was convened last Nov. because
state licensing authorities found the present Health Seryice facili-
ties unsatisfactory.
Since a new Health Service'building appeared necessary, It
was decided to study possible changes in its present general func-
tions and operations.
The Health Service is presently controlled' by the Office of
Student Services. About 1,000 students visit the facility each day,
and there is no fee for a normal visit with a staff physician.
k

-'I

Announcing two special programs!

44 o~, 4/-eW

N

SKI EQUIP EXCHANGE
BUY OR SELL
Barbour Gym-Dec. 4
BRING EQUIP TO SELL
9:00-12:00
SALE: 12:00-4:30
150% COMMISSION TO
U-M SKI RACERS

B32 South State
Ann Arbor

,::Ir:{ '+"r : "Sfii ti n
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30
Day Calendar
Music School: Trumpet Student Re-
cital, Sch. of Mus. Recital Hari 12:30
pm.
Ctr. for Coord. of Ancient & Modern
Studies: Thomas S. Jerome Lectures-
"From Croesus to Constantine: The Cl-
ties of Western Asia Minor and Their
Arts in Greek and Roman Times,"
George Hanfmann, Archaeology, Har-
vard Univ., "Croesus, Cardis, and the
(Continued on Page 9)
MAY WE SUGGEST a
SPersonalized Gi fs
Circle Pins
Lighters
Tie Tacks
Pendants
Charms
Pinkey Rings
Earrings
Lockets
Grandmother
Charms and
Bracelets

ROSTROPOVICH
The Great Soviet Cellist
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1972
Mstislav Rostropovich, one of the great cello masters of all
time, comes to Ann Arbor for the second time in January.
His astonishing repertoire includes all the major works for
the instrument, including those for cello and orchestra. His
unparalleled virtuosity and profound musicianship promises
Ann Arbor audiences a deeply moving musical experience.
Performanze time, 8:30, in Hill Auditorium. Tickets from
$2.50 to $' are now on sale at Burton Tower.

OSIPOV Balalaika Orch.
& BOLSHOI Opera Stars
& Russian Dancers
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1972
The Osipov Balalaika Orchestra and Bolshoi Opera Stars
present a gilttering Russian Folk Festival program; includ-
ing the distinctive sound of' massed balalaikas, and the
Soviet Union's finest voices and most accomplished dancers.
Their February appearance, the second in Ann Arbor, offers
another opportunity to enjoy this Russian national music
and dance.

Performance time, 8:30, in Hill Auditorium.
$2.50 to $7 are now on sale at Burton Tower.

Tickets from

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