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November 24, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-11-24

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-05054

-..&L Ld&- & 41P
mtr4togan

:43atil

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, November 24, 1971

11217 S University across from Campusiheateri

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

C .7 I

DIAL 8-6416
Shows TODAY
At 1-3-5-7-9

"it is a trip much worth taking. Not since '2001' has a movie
so cannily inverted consciousness and altered audience percep-
tion." -Time Magazine

IHELLSTROMCHRONICLEI
STARTING THURSDAY
FREE THE SPIRIT! FREE THE PEOPLE!
BEAUTIFUL FREAKS! STREET PEOPLE!
GREAT VIBES!
154 children drop in on the folks.

news briefs
By The Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday named a 14 member rent
Advisory Board to help formulate Phase 2 regulations to control
rents.
Headed by Thomas Curtis, a former Republican congressman'
from Missouri, the Board is expected to adopt the same guidelines for
rent increases, as the Pay board has on wage increases.
THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA'S admission into the
United Nations and the ouster of Nationalist China marks the
bankruptcy of U.S. policy of "being hostile, isolating and block-'
ading the Chinese people", Premier Chou En-lai said yesterday.
"It marks the defeat of U.S. imperialist hegemony in mani-
pulating the United Nations and monopolizing international affairs
since World War II," Chou En-lai said.
FOREIGN MINISTER ABBA EBAN yesterday called world
condemnation of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat as an "aggres-
sor and inciter of war."
Eban said the world had a responsibility to denounce Sadat for
the Egyptian leader's pledge to renew the battle with Israel.
ISRAELI DEFENSE MINISTER Moshe Dayan was accused
yesterday in Parliament of illegally digging for archeological
treasures.
Uri Avnery, a parliament representative, said it was not pos-
sible to impose stiff penalties on antiquity thieves while "Dayan digs
without hinderance" in Israel and occupied Arab territories.
COL. ORAN HENDERSON, defending himself against charg-
es of covering up the My Lai massacre, testified yesterday that
two days after the attack he "was satisfied there had been no
wrongdoing".
He said he accepted reports that 128 Viet Cong were killed and
20 to 28 civilians were killed inadvertently when caught in artillery
and helicopter gunship crossfire.
*
THE READING RAILROAD, claiming it cannot pay approxi-
mately $11 million in debts and taxes coming due shortly, yester-
day filed for reorganization under the federal bankruptcy laws.
The Reading was the second Philadelphia based- railroad to
take such action because of staggering financial problems, blaming
its financial difficulties on government forced commuter service.
MEMBERS OF THE CHILDREN OF GOD movement will be
urged to visit their families over the holiday period to counter
charges they are being held in the group's colonies against their
wills, a leader of the fundamentalist group said yesterday in
Houston.
Parents of teen'-agers and young adults who live in the colonies
of the so called "Jesus Freaks" have charged that leaders of the
organization hold some mysterious power over their children and
don't allow them to leave.
"To prove our faith in them, the members, we hereby are going
to have a massive worldwide demonstration throughout all our col-
onies . . . that these lies that some have been telling about us are
not true," the leader said.
_XExotic Gifts T1F

WASHINGTON (N) - The Senate Judiciary Committee
yesterday unanimously approved the Supreme Court nomi-
nation of Lewis Powell Jr. and endorsed the nomination of
William Rehnquist by a vote of 12 to 4.
President Nixon's nominees for the two court seats that
have been vacant since early September are now expected
to be brought up for confirmation in the Senate during the
later part of next week.
Republican leader Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania said he has
"no doubt in the world" that both nominations will be con-
firmed although Rehnquist will be opposed from the floor.
Powell, 64, is a wealthy Richmond, Va., lawyer and former
president of the American Bar Association. Rehnquist, 47,
formerly a lawyer in Phoenix, I

Senate
unit a
court

pproves

nominees.

j udiciary

-Associated Press
SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE members Edward Kennedy
(D-Mass), left, and Philip Hart (D-Mic.) were among four
senators on the committee who yesterday opposed the nomination
of William Rehnquist to the Supreme Court.
COSTLY AMENDMENTS:
Nion may veto tax
relief legislation,

Ariz., is a
Gen. John

top aide to Atty.
Mitchell.

WASHINGTON (,P) - Presi-
dent Nixon told Senate Repub-
lican leaders yesterday he would
scriously consider vetoing his
own tax relief bill unless it is
stripped of costly amendments
and a Democratic plan for pub-
lic financing of presidential
campaigns.
Senate Republican Leader
Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania
quoted Nixon as saying he
would give "very serious con-
sideration to vetoing the bill"
following a breakfast meeting he
had with Scott at the White
House.
Sen. Wallace Bennett. (R-
Utah) told the Senate the $27
billion tax cut bill it passed
yesterday "begs for a presiden-
tial veto." because of the cam-
paign finance provision, and
because it would cut taxes far
more than Nixon proposed as a
step to stimulate the economy.
Senate Democratic Leader of
Montant declined to say whether
Congress would pass a new tax
bill this year if Nixon vetoed the
current measure. "Let's wait and

see what he does," Mansfield
said.
Bennett, ranking Republican
on the Senate Finance Commit-
tee, said Senate amendments in-
creased the revenue reductions
built into the tax bill by some
$55 billion over the next decade.
"In addition to the tax loss
provisions, the amendment to
use federal income tax funds
to pay the costs of presidential
campaigns means that the bill
begs for a presidential veto,"
Bennett said.
The campaign finance plan
would enable taxpayers to check
a box on the returns to donate
$1 to the Democrats, the Repub-
licans, a third party or a non-
partisan fund.
Each major party could get up
to $20.4 million in public funds
for the 1972 campaign. That
would be a major boon to the
debt ridden Democrats. And the
high command of the Democra-
tic National Committee held a
strategy conference Tuesday to
discuss efforts to make sure the
amendment becomes law.

Nixon, in announcing their nom-
inations on Oct. 21, described them
as judicial conservatives.
The four committee members
who voted against Rehnquist's
nomination were Sens. Birch Bayh
(D-Ind); Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass), Philip Hart (D-Mich), and
John Tunney (D-Calif).
However, a fifth member of the
committee's liberal Democratic
bloc, Sen: Quentin Burdick of
North Dakota, voted with the ma-
jority.
Bayh said in a statement that
Rehnquist's record "reveals a
dangerous hostility to the great
principles of equal justice for all
people and individual freedom un-
der the Bill of Rights."
Sen. James Eastland (D-Miss),
the committee chairman, said "the
liberals have tried to build a case
against Mr. Rehnquist, but they
have failed utterly."
Clarence Mitchell, director of
the Washington office of the Na-
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People, call-
ed on "all senators who believe
in human rights" to vote against
Rehnquist.
At the committee's hearings,
Mitchell testified against Rehn-
quist's confirmation on behalf of
the Leadership Conference on Civil
Rights. A witness for the AFL-CIO
also opposed him.
The civil rights and 1 a b o r
spokesmen did not, however, tes-
tify against Powell.
Kennedy said Rehnquist has
been "a voice of resistance to
equal opportunity . . . a voice of
greater government power at the
expense of individual liberty."
Both Bayh and Kennedy said
that Powell, despite their disagree-
ment with some of his views, has
demonstrated a commitment to
constitutional liberties and human
rights.
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
^ Lee
Male
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

2

spending bill
WASHINGTON (A') - The Sen-
ate passed the massive $70.8 bil-
lion defense monies bill Tuesday
night after rejecting a proposed
60,000 troop cut in U.S. European
forces and approving an added
$500 million for military sales to
Israel.
By a vote of 80 to 5, the mea-
sure was sent to a Senate House
conference committee. The Sen-
ate had reduced the bill $2.7 bil-
lion below President Nixon's bud-
get and 200 million below the
House total.
For the second time in six
months, the Senate upheld Presi-
dent Nixon's European policies
by rejecting a proposal to with-
draw 60,000 U.S.ntroops from Eu-
rope by next June 15.1
The President won a second
victory in effect when anti-war
senators decided against offering
an amendment to cut off funds
for Indochina wardoperations ex-
cept for U.S. withdrawal.
In another action the Senate
moved to force the President to
provide additional help for Israel
by approving $500 million in cre-
dits for the sale of F4 Phantom
jets and other military weapons.
By an 82 to 14 roll call vote,
it approved an amendment offered
by Sen. Henry Jackson (D-
Wash.) and intended by him to
"balance the unrestrained flow of
sophisticated weapons to Egypt
from the Soviet Union."
A total of 78 senators have
signed letters to the President
urging funds to buy the planes be
made available to Israel at once.
The administration has been re-
luctant to make that move.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
1-800-522-3700
(TOLL FREE WATTS LINE)
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

Senate votes
huge defense

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music byTHE YOUNGBLOODS.DELANEYand BONNIE-and MOZART- Produced by
Francois Reichenbach and Tom Donahue - Directed by Francois Reichenbach - A French
Co-Production France Opera S.A.R.L. P.E.C.F. TECHNICOLOR*
RESTRICTED Under 17 requires

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330 MAYNARD
MONDAY, NOV. 29 ONLY (the day after Vacation)
LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
dir. ALAIN RESNAIS; screenplay by ROBBE-GRILLET
1961
* A man tries to convince a woman (Delphine Seyrig) that they have met before,
"perhaps at Marienbad," had an affair and planned to meet once again and run
away together.
* RESNAIS calls "MARIENBAD" ". . a film about the uncertinties of love .
addressed less to the intelligence than to the feelings."
* "Be prepared for an experience such os you've never had from watching a film
a unique and intense experience . . . brilliant photography . . . sumptuous set-
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0 GOLDEN BEAR AWARD-VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
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314Mfr4igan 4atg
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